SMC students ring in Chinese New Year

first_imgSaint Mary’s College rang in the Chinese New Year Thursday with a tea party, complete with paper lanterns, music and sweets. Held in the Warner Conference Room in the Student Center, the celebration featured two different types of Chinese tea, as well as snacks ranging from candies to biscuits. Alice Siqin Yang, assistant director of Global Education, said the tea party was held to raise awareness about the country, as well as to share information about study abroad programs. “I think that it’s important for students nowadays to know more about Chinese history and Chinese culture and Chinese language,” she said. During the event, students shared experiences studying abroad in China. Senior Julie Hagopian said students should consider the benefits of studying in China. “Just jump,” she said. “Just go. It’s one of the best. Financially it’s one of the best-priced trips. You still get three credits for it.” Hagopian said she had fears before her trip, but she did not regret her decision. “It’s scary going to a place that you don’t know the language,” Hagopian said. “You’re not exactly familiar with the culture or the food, but that’s the beauty of it. You just have to jump. Leave inhibitions at the door, and just go.” Hagopian said it is important to share the Chinese culture with the Saint Mary’s community. “General multicultural-ness is always important … to bring to the forefront that there are different cultures around the world,” she said. “Sometimes it’s not always represented as well in a beautiful, Midwestern, primarily white campus like our own, but reaching out makes it more clear that there are other cultures and they are just as vibrant as our own.” Yang said other events pertaining to Chinese culture would be held. On Feb. 19, the College will host the event “Chinese New Year Celebration.” The event will be held in O’Laughlin Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. It is free and open to the public. Yang said the event will have a variety of different cultural aspects to it including song, dance and kung fu.last_img read more

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Columnist gives Red Smith lecture

first_imgOne tweet says it all: “Journalism today all about speed, buzz, page views, instanaiety, not substance, leads to uninformed citizens, end of democracy, and probably civilization.” Kathleen Parker, author of the above tweet, Washington Post syndicated columnist and winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary, delivered the 29th annual Red Smith Lecture in Journalism on Thursday, titled “Journalism in the Age of Twitteracy.” Despite her success, Parker said she did not originally plan on becoming a journalist. Born in Winter Haven, Fla., she said reading was protection from unpleasant household chores for her. She said she read quite a bit in her youth. Parker left Florida in her early 20s, ventured north and began writing at the Charleston Evening Post. “I fell in love with journalism the old-fashioned way,” Parker said with a humorous bent. “We met at a party, we had a few drinks and one thing led to another. It really was love at first sight. “We made no money – I was taking home 90 bucks a week – but we were happy because we were doing something important,” she said. “There is nothing like going home at the end of the day with something in your hand that shows what you did.” Although she is always proud of her work, Parker said she often becomes frustrated while writing. “I do procrastinate and I do love-hate writing, because it’s so hard,” she said. “Writing is extremely difficult. I have to sift through masses of information to determine what is meaningful, and then find the meaning in that.” Her early experiences in journalism differ greatly from that of young journalists in the current age, Parker said. “I’m afraid that the spirit that I grew up with seems to be dead. Technology may have liberated us from newsprint,” she said. Technology may enable individuals to accomplish tasks faster and more efficiently, Parker said, but such efficiency is often overrated. “Twitter is fast, furious, spontaneous and immediate. But haste is the enemy of accuracy,” she said. “We know a lot of stuff. But are we really smarter?” Parker said technology changes human behavior, even if it does not change essential human nature. “The consensus seems to be that we’re better off with more people, more non-journalists, more people who are non-media talking,” she said. Parker said she disagreed with the consensus. “All voices are not created equal,” she said. She added that writers today feel more entitled, without paying their “journalistic dues.” Parker referenced her tweet when she presented the real problem of today’s generation. “A 2008 study showed that 34 percent of young people age 18-24 get no news from any source on a typical day,” Parker said. “If no one is reading the news, how will we manage a democratic government that relies on an informed citizen?” Parker’s experience with journalism will soon become simply a generation of journalism history, she said. “We have to convince them [young people] of the importance of news to self-governance. I think this will be a real challenge in the age of Twitteracy,” Parker said.last_img read more

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Dance Marathon announces theme

first_imgBelles will don ten-gallon hats and snakeskin boots at this year’s country western themed 2013-2014 Dance Marathon. The theme for the annual Saint Mary’s event was announced Tuesday at the group’s “First Year Call Out” event. Junior co-president Kristen Millar said the Dance Marathon raises funds and awareness for the young patients of Riley Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis. “It was started nine years ago by a girl who was really passionate about doing dance marathons and really wanted to do something to help her community and kids who are less fortunate,” Millar said. Throughout the year Dance Marathon sponsors several events including flash mobs, EMX and Dance Marathon merchandise sales and an annual 5k walk/run, Millar said. The main event will take place April 5, she said. “What you try to do is stay on your feet for a full 12 hours in order to raise money for these kids,” Millar said. Last year, the Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon raised a grand total of $104,374.83 for Riley’s Children Hospital, but Millar said the work is not about reaching a goal but rather having a lasting impact on Riley families. “It’s just something fun, even if we don’t hit our goal, because it’s more about awareness than anything else,” she said. Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon has had such an exceptional relationship with the Riley organization for the past nine years that Saint Mary’s has a room in the hospital, Millar said. “Saint Mary’s actually has their own room and it’s really cool because if you ever go there, they can take you to see it,” she said. Millar said she has been involved with Dance Marathon since she was in high school, and her favorite part is meeting Riley families that benefited from raised funds. “I think something that really stuck with me was one man said ‘you are beautifully and fearfully made,’” she said. “His one child was having procedure after procedure and nothing seemed to be working, but they just prayed, and against all odds the child made it.” Millar said the goal of Tuesday’s event was to introduce first year students to Dance Marathon. “I hope that freshmen learn about what Dance Marathon is and that they are excited about this event, but mostly I want people to come to our marathon and really experience it for themselves,” she said. At the event, Millar and co-president, senior Ellen Smith, explained the two different ways first year students could get involved. “First Year Committee is just made of freshmen and their main objective is to really reach out to the freshmen who haven’t necessarily been in this environment before and haven’t seen all the Dance Marathon propaganda around campus,” Millar said. “Miracle workers mostly focus on the day of the marathon by helping with the event getting started and helping with set up and clean up.” Millar said she is excited not only for freshmen to get involved but is looking forward to beginning the year. “Realizing how much you can actually do to help these kids by hearing the stories, seeing all the smiles on their faces and knowing you’re making a difference is what really hits home,” she said.last_img read more

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Professor contests O’ Reilly’s portrayal

first_imgOn the Oct. 2 show of “The O’Reilly Factor” on Fox News, host Bill O’Reilly butted heads with Notre Dame theology professor Candida Moss over her critical review of his bestselling book, “Killing Jesus,” in The Daily Beast. The segment introduced Moss as a theology professor who argued that Jesus was a socialist. “But here’s the thing: I’ve never argued that Jesus was a socialist,” Moss told The Observer earlier this week. “Then they pulled this tweet that I had re-tweeted from someone else, and they wanted me to defend it.” Moss said she regularly writes for The Daily Beast, using humor to “inject humility into the conversation.” She said her review of “Killing Jesus” mostly criticized O’Reilly’s historical methodology. “He does a really fantastic job of incorporating details from Roman history and contemporaneous events into his account, but it’s really a novel,” Moss said. “He doesn’t know what Herod is thinking when Herod is looking through a window. And he doesn’t really take a critical view of the gospels.” Moss said she also criticized some smaller factual errors, such as misinformation about the ancient Palestinian tax structure and Jesus’ position towards caring for the poor. The content of the pre-interview in preparation for the segment didn’t relate to the content of the actual interview, Moss said. “They asked me what I thought about Bill [O’Reilly] and the Holy Spirit, they asked me some of the details of the review about the book, they asked me about ObamaCare,” she said. “Then they did mention that they would ask me about the sentence [in my review] about Jesus providing free healthcare. that did make it into the televised interview.” This was the sentence: “There’s no mention of the free health care offered by Jesus and his followers or the insistence that the wealthy give away their possessions.” This wasn’t Moss’ first foray into television, having worked on segments for CBS News and National Geographic, but it was the first time she met O’Reilly. “It was an intimidating situation, and it didn’t help that I had written a critical review. I would say I have seen him be more antagonistic,” she said. “For Bill O’Reilly audiences, once you put the word ‘socialist’ on the screen, I probably didn’t have much of a shot.” Moss said she has received mixed reviews of her performance on the show. “I’ve gotten a lot of strongly-worded emails, and I think that’s evidence that a lot of people care about this subject,” she said. “I’ve gotten some supportive emails, though, and seeing what people are saying tol[O’Reilly], I can’t really complain about the things they are saying about it. “It’s not just me; it’s insight into what’s it like if you have a public voice on something as controversial as religion” I try not to Google myself.” Moss, who studied at the University of Oxford for her undergraduate years and did her graduate studies at Yale University, will fly back to New York today to continue coverage with Fox News. “[O’Reilly] did give me the last word. And he doesn’t always do that,” she said. “I think that if someone had written a negative review of my book, I would have been more antagonistic toward them.” Moss said a lot of her criticism would not have been necessary if O’Reilly had categorized his book as a historical fiction novel. “It’s really well-written, it’s really an engaging read,” she said. “If you wanted someone who has a right-wing political figure to write you a historical imagination of Jesus, this would be the book to read. If you wanted to read about the historical Jesus, I would recommend John Meier’s ‘A Marginal Jew.’” Contact Meghan Thomassen at mthomass@nd.edulast_img read more

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Lecturer rejects stigma of online dating

first_imgIn the 21st century, technology revolutionized nearly every aspect of learning and educating, but it also changed the face of a much more personal aspect of our lives: dating.  Dr. Elizbeth Ribarsky, assistant professor of communications at the University of Illinois, Springfield hosted a talk on “Dating in the Digital Age,” in the Hospitality Room of South Dining Hall on Thursday.  The lecture functioned as a how-to guide introducing audience members to online dating and warned about common mistakes they can make in setting up a profile and interacting with individuals online. Ribarsky said her goal in the lecture was to remove the stigma from online dating. “The stigma is that only creepy people go online,” Ribarsky said. “Or that they’re desperate. Or that they may not be anybody of who they say they actually are. Even though we see a huge influx in the number of individuals engaging in online dating and the number of individuals getting married from online relationships, there is still a level of stigmatization.”  Online dating is very functional because it allows an individual to cast a wide net and sort through people who they may or may not be interested much more quickly than face-to-face interaction, Ribarsky said. She said a drawback comes when people misrepresent themselves online. “Men, on average, exaggerate their height by one inch,” Ribarsky said. “Women, on average, tend to underreport their weight by about 15 pounds.” Ribarsky said the typical pool of online daters could be broken up into four categories: romantics, junkies, disappearing acts and realists. She said romantics often, “think falling in love online is awesome and wonderful and begin to feel these notions of love before they even meet somebody.”  A realist, Ribarsky said, “recognizes that online dating, or any form of technology, and how it influences our relationships is simply another tool that allows us to meet people. They realize they are not going to immediately fall in love with the people they meet online.” She said she would encourage all of the audience members to take this approach to dating in the digital age.  Ribarsky said there are a plethora of different dating sites from which an individual can choose to sign up, ranging from interest based sites to matching sites to sites that charge a fee to sign up. “Pay for self-selecting sites require that you pay to sign up,” Ribarsky said. “Typically, when individuals are willing to pay for a site they are, perhaps, a little bit more serious about wanting to find somebody.” When it comes to choosing a site, Ribarsky said it could be helpful to put a filter on one’s contacts in order to pinpoint responses from a specific age group or geographical area.  “Interestingly, each site develops their own reputation,” Ribarsky said. “Match [of Match.com] is one of the largest companies. They have famously started having ‘stir events,’ which are like mixers. … These stir events give people the comfort that everyone showing up is there with the same purpose.” E Harmony, Match, Christian Mingle and Ourtime are among the most widely used sites, Ribarsky said. She said it is important to create a username that lets a viewer see your interests and to spend time thinking of a headline that is inviting and interesting. Ribarsky said a common mistake made by online daters is to be boring or basic when it is best to be positive and interesting, that way a viewer will be intrigued to learn more information. Lastly, Ribarsky said the profile picture that a person selects could make a major difference in his or her online dating persona.  “Think about anything that you’re showing in your picture is also creating an impression for you,” Ribarsky said. “If your photo is taken outside in the mountains it can give off the impression that I’m outdoorsy. Think about those activities but be conscious of the impression you are putting out there.” She said finding similarities through chatting is key.  “Be specific, tell them about your average Saturday or average Sunday so they know what you’re like.” Ribarsky closed by saying that dating can attract people who misrepresent themselves and deception does happen. She said there is also, at time, a heightened sense of comfort when interacting with people online that encourages people to share more than they might in a face-to-face interaction.  “The one thing that I always stress to people is to just remember that online dating is just another tool to try to find people, the same as going out to a bar or to a church group to meet people,” she said. Ribarsky said maintaining a balanced, honest portrayal online is an individuals’ best bet for success.  “Remember, this is essentially an advertisement for you,” she said. “In any advertisement you will sell the best features of it. But at the same time, don’t boast. This is a time to pick out your best characteristics and highlight those. However, people often undersell themselves too.”  Contact Meg Handelman at mhandelm@nd.edulast_img read more

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International Education Week promotes awareness of global affairs

first_imgThis week, Saint Mary’s students don’t have to take a 12-hour flight to gain a better understanding of life in other parts of the world and grow as people while immersing themselves in the traditions of other cultures. A five-minute walk to the student center will take students to International Education Week, an annual event that promotes increased knowledge of global events and cultures.Sara Shoemake | The Observer The Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) designed this year’s events, and assistant director for global education Alice Siqin Yang said the week will encourage students both to grow personally and develop leadership skills.“The international education offered here will enable students to be more successful in a globally competitive society while they make contributions to world peace,” Yang said.  “It provides students with the perspectives they need to meet challenges.”Monday’s “Henna on My Hands” activity from 12-1 p.m. will demonstrate the Arabic tradition of Henna art, a practice typically performed at weddings. Later Monday night, several students will discuss the benefits of studying abroad in countries such as Austria, China, Ecuador, England, Ireland, Italy and Uganda during the “Intercultural Learning Showcase” from 5:30-7:30 p.m.“Recent returnees will share their experiences and interactions with local people in different cultural contexts,” Yang said. “They will talk about their re-entry adjustment and skills they have learned.”The purpose of International Education Week is not necessarily to convince people to travel across the world, though the speeches and events may impact students in such a way that they choose to. Rather, the week’s main intention is to inform the Saint Mary’s community and to maintain a welcoming environment that embraces other cultures.Tuesday’s “Writing Across the World – ELS Program” showcase from 12-1 p.m. involves Japanese, Indian, Korean, Kuwaiti and Saudi Arabian students writing different sayings in different languages on keepsake cards.“This is a good opportunity to know more about different languages throughout the world, including Japanese, Korean, Arabic, Hindi and Chinese,” Yang said.A panel discussion on Wednesday from 6-7 p.m. will examine the consequences of the unprecedented result of the 2014 Indian election, which resulted in a surprising victory for the Bharatiya Janata Party and its Prime Minister candidate Narendra Modi.Thursday night’s International Cultural Festival from 5-7 p.m. will include music, dancing and performances from international students and will end the week on a positive note, Yang said.“It showcases a variety of ethnic presentations by international students and cultural clubs,” Yang said. “It is a chance for our international students to share with everyone where they are from.”CWIL members have gone to great lengths to organize this instructive and fun-filled week, which Yang calls a celebration of cultures.“It is an opportunity to learn from international students, study abroad experiences, guest speakers on international politics, movies and arts,” Yang said. “It recognizes the contributions that international students and scholars make in internationalizing the campus.”Tags: Alice Siqin Yang, International Education Week, Saint Mary’s student center, study abroadlast_img read more

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Students explore the pressures of ‘being a Saint Mary’s poster girl’

first_imgIn the latest installment of the Saint Mary’s Justice Friday series, freshman Alex Shambery and junior Angge Roncal presented “Being an SMC Poster Girl,” a discussion on the pressure to “have it all.”The presentation was an open discussion between Saint Mary’s women about the pressures that come with being a Saint Mary’s poster girl and how that affects the students as leaders, Shambery said.The question of who or what an SMC poster girl is was opened to the audience. “I think it’s trying to tackle everything,” first year Morgan Matthews, an audience member, said. “It’s being very well-rounded but not in the best sense. You have to be religious, you have to be studious, you have to be inviting, you have to be personable, you have to have a lot of friends and be really incorporated into the community.“But that’s not everyone. You have people who want to stay in their own shell, who like to be alone. I think that puts pressure on those who don’t meet those expectations.” Shambery then asked the audience about the various pressures they have felt while on campus.“We go to a single-sex college, all women, and you think that we shouldn’t be led by these pressures,” Roncal said. “We’re still held to these social standards. A woman is expected to do certain things, but she’s not allowed to complain. She’s expected to act a certain way, and not let her ‘silly’ emotions come into play.”The pressures at an all-women’s college are different than at a school with men, because the all-female environment gives women an empowered atmosphere that may add to the pressures, Matthew said. “I would say that sometimes they portray [Saint Mary’s] as the place where you go to become a social butterfly and they portray [Notre Dame] as the place where you go to become a CEO,” Shambery said. “I think that itself puts pressure on us because we want to let them know ‘I can be a CEO and I can be a social butterfly’ or ‘No, I don’t want to be a social butterfly. I want to do my own thing.’ I think that that adds pressure to the pressure we already put on ourselves.” Another audience member, first year Courtney Weston, said she feels the school itself puts pressure on students.“They advocate that you’re going to come here and you’re going to become this great woman,” Weston said. “You’re going to have good leadership [skills]. That’s what they promise. So you’re here and now have to be a leader and learn these qualities. What if you don’t want to be a leader?”Students also named the pressure to pick the “right” major as very prevalent on the Saint Mary’s campus. The pressure among majors stems from society and the need to find a job right after college, Roncal said.“It’s no longer based on really enjoying the subject,” she said. “It’s more if it will make you money or if you’ll be better off.”Matthews identified diversity as an issue that acts as a source of pressure for some students.“You see the stereotypical white, Vineyard Vine-loving girl. It’s very preppy … I wouldn’t say it’s a pressure, but it’s the fact that if you look like an outcast, you have to fall in with the norms and you have to start dressing preppy and acting preppy.”“It’s why everyone has to have the Hunter rain boots or the [L.L.] Bean snow boots, the LuLu Lemon workout clothes,” Weston said. “It’s something that everyone has, but if you come here not having any of that, you think, ‘Maybe I should start having that.’”Tags: Being a SMC Poster Girl, Justice Fridays, saint mary’slast_img read more

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Notre Dame explores process for sexual assault

first_imgSusan Zhu Editor’s Note: This is the first installment of a five-part series on sexual assault at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories focus on the process for students reporting sexual assaults.Over the past year, the University’s administration, Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and the Special Victims Unit (SVU) of St. Joseph County have implemented policies to revise and raise awareness about the process of reporting, investigating and prosecuting sexual assaults.Heather Ryan, Deputy Title IX Coordinator, said Notre Dame students reporting a sexual assault have the option to pursue a complaint through the University Conduct Process or law enforcement. A victim can choose to pursue both options, concurrently or one after the other.“The University takes every single one of these reports extremely seriously, and we must and do investigate every single one that comes to our attention, where we have enough information to pursue an investigation,” Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president of Student Affairs, said.Hoffmann Harding also said the University has a number of confidential resources on and off campus for students who have been sexually assaulted, including the University Counseling Center (UCC), University Health Services (UHS), the vowed religious in the Campus Ministry office and the Family Justice Center.The Deputy Title IX Coordinator is informed of all sexual assaults reported by students to non-confidential University resources, Ryan said.“I try to give students as many opportunities to make choices as I can,” she said. “As we receive information and I have someone come to my office, it involves sitting down, talking through what the possible next steps are, as we look at the information we have at hand.”Ryan said her first priority is to provide a student with the resources he or she needs. Students, both those filing complaints and those responding to complaints, are assigned to resource coordinators — trained Notre Dame faculty or administrators who will help explain the reporting options and the available support services.If a student identifies a suspect, the University will open an administrative investigation, Ryan said. However, an investigation will not always be referred to the University Conduct Process, she said.“At the end of the process, the person [who filed the complaint] … has the opportunity to make a decision about whether or not we pursue the University Conduct Process,” Ryan said. “Then, if they choose not to pursue that, we do have another board that will look at the information and make a final decision.”“We assess risk and look at impact on community, potential impacts on other people to determine if we ultimately want it to go to the University Conduct Process,” she said.Keri Kei Shibata, deputy chief of NDSP, said the criminal investigation process starts with similar discussions. NDSP has an obligation to tell the Deputy Title IX Coordinator if a student reports a sexual assault to them, she said.“We’re going to have the same conversation about using us as an option and how this process would go,” Shibata said. “We’re going to investigate. We are impartial. We are trying to find the facts.”NDSP’s trained law enforcement investigators are experienced, Shibata said, allowing them to conduct investigations in the most efficient and effective way possible.“The captain of our investigative unit came from the FBI,” she said. “One of our other investigators, a sergeant, was formerly in charge of a Special Victims Unit in Elkhart. … The team has a lot of experience, both on and off campus.”Shibata said investigations for sexual assault cases include interviews with the suspect, victims and any witnesses. The investigators also look for physical evidence or electronic evidence, such as text messages or photos.“We’re looking for the most clear picture we can have of what happened during the incident and the time surrounding it. That’s our goal,” she said.A criminal investigation would be conducted by whatever agency the sexual assault is reported to, Aimee Herring, lead deputy prosecutor at the SVU of Saint Joseph County, said.“That’s actually something that a lot of students are not aware of — that they have the option of reporting an incident to the Notre Dame Police Department or they have the opportunity of reporting it to the Saint Joseph County Police Department,” Herring said.An incident that occurs on Notre Dame’s campus is also under the jurisdiction of Saint Joseph County, Herring said.“If a student reports to the Saint Joseph County Police Department, it becomes a Special Victim Units case, where one of the [Saint Joseph County SVU] investigators would be assigned,” Herring said. “It’s the opposite if it went the other way — if a student chooses to report to Notre Dame directly, Notre Dame police would lead the investigation.”Herring said if an incident is reported to the Saint Joseph SVU, they notify Notre Dame about the crime because of the University’s obligation to comply with the Clery Act. However, Herring said, the victim will be informed of this procedure and aware of the extent of information being shared.“There are specific instances in which Notre Dame has to notify all students regarding an ongoing threat on campus,” Herring said. “If that were the situation, obviously Notre Dame doesn’t know about it until they’re told.”Herring said an SVU prosecutor works with the investigative team — from any of the police agencies — throughout the entire process from the instance a sexual assault is reported.“If it’s an emergency situation and a suspect has been identified, then the police agency is supposed to be contacting the deputy prosecutor that’s on call from the Special Victims Unit,” she said. “It reduces the amount of time that we then spend going over information that we already could have been privy to and allows us to be part of the investigation from the outset, providing advice or guidance when needed.”This policy was implemented when Ken Cotter, Saint Joseph County Prosecutor, took office last year, Herring said.“It’s been a long-standing policy that the lead attorneys at each department are pretty much on call anyways all the time,” she said. “It just became an official policy that we would rotate who would be on call and identify the specific people who have the appropriate knowledge and experience to be on call during specific time frames and to mandate the departments to make that contact.”After the investigation stage, NDSP or Saint Joseph SVU investigators present the case to a prosecutor, Herring said.“Once the case gets to our desk for review, we … aren’t just looking to see if the case is chargeable,” she said. “We have to look at the elements of the effects … to determine if the legislation has revealed, first, that a criminal act has occurred and second, that we can prove that case beyond a reasonable doubt in court to a jury.”Herring said she thinks the media’s reports of an increase in incidents reflects the increase in the number of victims reporting sexual assaults, rather than the number of incidents occurring.“I think it tells us victims know they have been violated, know what to do when they’ve been violated and what options they have,” she said. “They are seeking help if they need it. They are reporting if they want to.”Tags: deputy title IX coordinator, Notre Dame, sexual assault series 2015, Title IX, title ix processlast_img read more

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Community remembers Annrose Jerry at Basilica Mass

first_imgObserver File Photo A mass was held in memory of Notre Dame senior Annrose Jerry in the Basilica Monday night. The Basilica was standing room only as members of the community gathered to honor and remember Jerry.McCormick framed this point by noting that the only variable with respect to time is how much of it we receive.“We have our expectations that we all live to a happy old age, and there’s nothing wrong with that desire,” he said. “The reality that we face is that our mortality has a way of operating under a different set of guiding principles.”Turning to a discussion of Jerry, McCormick noted the anguish facing the community in the wake of her loss.“Tonight, we gather to remember a beloved member of our community, Annrose Jerry,” McCormick said. “From the outside looking in, we see all of the markings of a long tenure in life: a loving family, a deep faith, a second semester senior with an acceptance already into graduate school, communities within Notre Dame where she is loved and admired … however, Annrose does not fit our expected narrative. Just 21 years old, Annrose’s life came to an end. Death met her before anyone could have anticipated.”McCormick acknowledged that making sense of such a loss is hard. People immediately think with sadness about a life that was cut too short in these situations, he said.“One interpretation of these past several days is to greet the news with sadness. The sadness rooted in the fact that Annrose’s life was just too short,” he said. “She had much more to offer. We begin to think what could have been, what life had been possible. This type of sadness typically leads us to ask one question: what can be done so that such a tragedy will not happen again?”McCormick said fear largely motivates this reaction, and fear is not the best way to deal with these emotions. He said scripture offers humans a better approach: surrendering themselves to God, because God wants to help humans through their journey.“The mystery of the Incarnation — Jesus taking on human flesh — reveals to us that God desires to walk amongst us, to share and experience our anxieties, our challenges, our hopes, our joys,” he said.In order to capture this full range of human emotion, it is important to live in the present, McCormick said.“The challenge, if we are not attentive to the past and the future, is that we can simply spend all of our time there,” McCormick said. ”… Instead of taking in a beautiful sunset in its radiance, we worry instead about what the sky will look like when it’s gone. Or worry about a mistake we made an hour ago, and we fail to fully capture the excitement of a friend who desires to share with us something great that’s just happened. This happens all the time.”Exploring the purpose of the service, McCormick said congregants should apply this principle and not focus on the fact that Jerry’s life ended too soon, but rather celebrate and express gratitude for the life she lived.“The invitation this night provides is to give thanks for Annrose’s life and to entrust her to the tender love and mercy of God,” he said. “This posture, I admit, requires a mindfulness that roots our decisions in the virtues of faith, hope and love. While challenging, to remain steadfast to that, in the moment, they will serve — I promise you — as better guides than fear ever will.”Tags: Annrose Jerry, Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Fr. Pete McCormick, University President Fr. John Jenkins Community members gathered Monday night in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart to remember and celebrate the life of Annrose Jerry, a Notre Dame senior. Jerry was reported missing last Thursday and her body was discovered Friday in St. Mary’s Lake.University President Fr. John Jenkins celebrated the mass and director of Campus Ministry Fr. Pete McCormick delivered the homily. Vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding delivered a reading, while senior and student body president Elizabeth Boyle read half of the Prayers of the Faithful.The crowd in Notre Dame’s Basilica was standing room only. Towards the end of his homily, McCormick announced Jerry had posthumously been awarded her diploma earlier in the evening.In welcoming the congregation to the service, Jenkins took note of the communal sadness of the occasion. However, he said the mass was also filled with a certain sense of hope.“We come here, of course, with very heavy hearts, as we mourn the passing of Annrose,” Jenkins said in his opening remarks. “But we also come with hope. The hope of Jesus, who overcame sin and death.”In his homily, McCormick reflected on the passage of time.“Lately, I’ve been thinking about the curious nature of time,” McCormick said. ”There are moments when time moves painfully slowly — think of a class that just would not end. Typically, the moment we start looking at the clock, it’s almost as if the second hand is dipped in molasses … Then there are other moments, when time seemingly just zips down the clock … yet whether slow or fast, time is methodical.”last_img read more

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Sailing Club begins practice after a delayed start to the season

first_imgMeghan Cappitelli | The Observer The Notre Dame Sailing club started their practices three weeks ago.As a RecSports-registered team, Sailing Club was not permitted to begin practicing until Sept. 14. In the spirit of safety, the club took an extra week to devise a practice plan that adheres to necessary health guidelines.This plan includes wearing masks while sailing, staggering entry to the boathouse area, spraying down the gear and boats post-practice and practicing in eight “pods.” Each pod has 10 members.Senior and vice commodore Peter Pillari said these measures and the nature of sailing itself allows the team to conduct practice in a safe manner that closely resembles the way in which the team used to practice.“Sailing is a distanced sport inherently because we are all on different boats,” Pillari said. “We are able to get out there and do many of the things we normally would, like teaching new members about sailing.”However, there is one major difference between practices pre-pandemic and practices now, senior and commodore Chloe Frentzel said.“Normally our practices are pretty free-flowing, and people just come when they are available,” Frentzel said. “This year, because of contact tracing, we have to assign groups and times, so people might not be able to come four times a week like they usually would.”While practices have resumed in a semi-normal way, the team will be unable to compete in regattas this semester. For Frentzel and many other team members, not attending regattas is disappointing, as the events are typically a team-favorite.“It’s nice to get to see the new sailors at their first regattas and also host teams here and show them around,” Frentzel said.The club hopes to compete at some point during the year, but at this time continues to adhere to University policies, as well as the policies of other teams in the conference. In the absence of regattas, the club has been making efforts to foster an atmosphere of team bonding in other ways, including team dinners after practices.Sophomore and vice captain Hope Gallagher described her favorite aspect of Sailing Club as the community, noting that the social part of the club looks a bit different this semester.“A big part of the sailing club is the social piece, and a lot of years we get a handful of social members,” Gallagher said. “We try to host team dinners after practice to kind of build up some of those relationships, especially with the freshmen.”For Gallagher, the lost opportunity of sailing in the warmer weather earlier this year was a significant disappointment.“A big bummer of COVID was that in the time it took to coordinate everything, we lost a lot of time and warm weather,” Gallagher said. “We didn’t get to start until about two weeks ago, which is unfortunate since we were here for a good part of August.”As the semester progresses, the Sailing Club hopes to continue practicing and get out on the water as a team.Tags: COVID-19, Here, Sailing Club The Notre Dame Sailing Club has adjusted to new COVID-19 rules and regulations, both on and off the boats, and is now setting sail into its third week of practice.last_img read more

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