Johnson seeks improvement ahead of St. Cloud series

first_imgAfter last year’s Wisconsin women’s hockey team finished the season with an impressive 33-5-2 record and earned the 2012 WCHA regular season title, this year’s squad has some big skates to fill as they began this season with an 8-4-2 start.Dealing with a handful of injuries and several lineup changes, head coach Mark Johnson has a positive outlook on the rest of the season. Johnson explained you cannot control injuries and never know when they are going to come.He also said the teams that reach the final games of the season have usually been healthy throughout the season.“As we approach this season, obviously a couple things are thrown at you, and you try to work around them,” Johnson said at his weekly press conference Monday. “So you get ready for games, you put lineups together, you put in different positions and you try to move forward.”The Badgers are coming off a competitive weekend split with Ohio State, a series that began with a 4-2 win Friday night. Wisconsin netted its first goal on a penalty shot and strong special teams play allowed them to escape with the win.On Saturday afternoon, the second game was a different story as they fell to the Buckeyes on the road, 3-1.“We weren’t able to capitalize on our opportunities,” Johnson said. “We had quite a few of them, and it seems when we have a setback it usually is we’re not able to get the puck in on a regular basis.”Heading into this week’s practices ahead of St. Cloud State, the team is still making adjustments and looking for areas to improve.Johnson said he is proud of the way the team has competed and his team has been practicing hard, factors he said will give his players a chance to win any game they compete in the rest of the year.“The games that we haven’t been successful in are the games we haven’t been able to score goals in,” he said. “We went three games without scoring a goal [earlier this month].”The competition in the WCHA has continued to improve this season, as Johnson said even four or five years ago some of the conference’s squads were not as deep as they are now and present new problems for every opponent.As their opponents have improved, the UW women’s hockey head coach said his team has done its best to follow suit.“Certainly when you graduate people that have the magnitude of some of the players that we have, those are tough kids to replace,” Johnson said. “As I mentioned the efforts are there, we have good character kids, we’re younger then we’ve been in the past. With that you have some growing pains, but you give me three more goals we probably have three more wins.”Johnson was also asked if LaBahn Arena – the new home arena for the Wisconsin women’s hockey team – feels like home yet for the coach and his players.“Everybody is getting more comfortable. It’s Thanksgiving, and we are certainly thankful for what we have over there. I’m sure [UW men’s hockey coach] Mike [Eaves] can say the same thing. As we continue to practice, as we continue to go there on a daily basis and play more games, it really becomes a place that you are very fortunate to have.”With few injuries and an impressive start to a new season, Johnson said his young team, loaded with eight freshmen, will continue to look at how it can continue to develop chemistry and improve as a unit.Two of the most important ways for the Badgers to do so are taking greater advantage of their power plays and creating more opportunities on the offensive side of the ice to score.“If we are able to do that, whether it’s against St. Cloud State or the following weekend against Minnesota and then North Dakota, that’s when we are going to be successful,” Johnson said. “So look forward to the competition both Friday and Saturday afternoon against St. Cloud.”last_img read more

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Q&A with track and field star Amalie Iuel

first_imgLast week, Amalie Iuel, a junior on the track and field team, spoke to the Daily Trojan in a one-on-one interview, where she gave insight into her life as an international student athlete, what her future goals are and more.The junior heptathlete is having an amazing season so far. She set a Norwegian record for the women’s indoor 400m race at the New Mexico Classic, scored the most points by any college athlete in the heptathlon this season at the Sam Adams Combined Events Invitational and has consistently achieved personal records throughout the season.Daily Trojan: Rumor is that you are trying to qualify for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Is this true? Would it be as a heptathlete?Amalie Iuel: This is true. I would be competing for Norway. I haven’t quite decided whether I want to compete for the hurdles or for the heptathlon. Obviously, I have to hit the standards first and then make the choice. But, as of now, I think I have a better shot at the hurdles.DT: Was being a heptathlete always the goal?AI: Yeah I think it was always a big dream of mine. Carolina Klüft, she’s a Swedish heptathlete who was always my idol. I loved her. And, I always liked doing multiple events. I could never stick with one; it was way too boring.DT: As a heptathlete, how do you have time to practice all of the events?AI: I come in for the main sprint practices on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and then Saturday, if we don’t have a meet. Then, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I’ll do the jumping events and the throws. Sometimes I’ll have to split up my practices, come in the morning, then come back later on and do some throws and some jumpsDT: Do you feel like some of your events suffer because of how much you have to practice?AI: Yes. I feel like I lack points in the throwing events … Especially since I don’t look like a thrower as you can see [flexes]. I feel like I don’t get to throw as much as I’d like to.DT: Do you have a favorite event?AI: It has to be the long jump. There’s no rush with anything. You don’t have to go off of a gun. You don’t have to worry about knocking a bar over. You go at your own pace and you just jump.DT: You are Norwegian, you were born in Denmark, you went to high school in Bangkok, and now you’re in L.A. for college. Is there somewhere you’d like to live permanently later on in life?AI: I love L.A. I could definitely see myself staying here or going back home [Norway]. It’s a good place to start a family. I think I want to do what I did; I moved around a lot. It allowed me to experience a lot, so if I get a job that allows me to travel, I’d be OK with that.DT: Are you trying to become a professional athlete? Or will you be looking for a “normal” job once you’re out of college?AI: I’m looking to go pro. That’d be awesome! If I can’t do it here, I’ll go home and do it. That’s the overall goal. I want to keep running for as long as I can. Then I’ll start looking for a normal job; I’ll have my degree [at USC] as a backup.DT: You graduated from a high school in Bangkok. What were the biggest differences in training there compared to here?AI: Ugh … The heat! Bangkok has two seasons: hot and hotter. But you also have a rain season; in the fall it rains a lot, so it gets really, really humid. And with the rain comes the thunder and lightning, so practice gets interrupted a lot. And it’s not the kind of rain you see here. It’s intense! And in the summer time it just gets really, really, really hot.DT: How are you dealing with living so far away from your parents and siblings?AI: They live in Norway right now, but they’re moving to Dubai, where I also used to live a couple years ago. It sucks. I miss my family so much. I come from a big family: I have four siblings, so there’s seven of us in total. There’s always something going on. So I miss them a whole bunch. DT: What motivates you to train and compete?AI: I’m very competitive. I don’t like getting beat. Even like the smallest things, I take way too seriously. I always feel the need to be the best, even though it takes a long, long while to get there. But that’s my main goal, to hopefully win a medal someday.DT: When did you know that competing in track and field is what you wanted to do?AI: My parents threw me into it. I treated everything like a competition. They must have thought I was really annoying because of all of my energy.I remember one time, I think I was 7, [my younger cousin] was 4, and I was like “Let’s race!” and I would beat her by a whole lot. I didn’t go easy on her like you typically would. No, I would go all out and I would stand there be like “Ha-ha! You lost!” So it was terrible. My parents were like, “You can’t keep doing this!” So, they put me in track and field. And I loved it, because I got to do what I love doing: competing and racing.DT: What’s the most important thing your coaches have taught you — about life or about track and field?AI: That you can achieve whatever you put your mind to.DT: How did you celebrate breaking a Norwegian record?AI: We went out to a barbecue place right after. I was choosing between one pound of ribs and two pounds, and everyone was saying, “No, no, no! You’re not gonna be able to finish!” So, me and couple of the guys [each] got the two pounds. And I slayed them. I mean, they had nothing on me.DT: You play guitar and sing; what is your favorite song to cover?AI: I like “Riptide” [by Vance Joy]. I like playing that; it’s a fun song to cover. I don’t get to do it as much anymore because I really don’t have much time on my hands.DT: What is your favorite song to listen to (or band, or genre)?AI: Favorite artist: Kygo. I need him to calm me down before a race.DT: Favorite movie?AI: Inception.DT: Favorite meal?AI: Sushi! Or like a medium-rare rib-eye steak! Very different but both so delicious! I’m not very picky with my food, but I’m a food lover.DT: How do you relax?AI: Netflix. Hulu. HBO GO.DT: What is your dream vacation?AI: I need to go to Australia. I always wanted to go. Or New Zealand, Peru. I don’t have one. I want to go everywhere. I want to explore.DT: Describe Coach Caryl [Smith Gilbert] in a word?AI: Intense.last_img read more

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African-born Player Undecided About International Future

first_imgRelated Everton youngster Beni Baningime has revealed that he has not reached a decision on his international future.The 19-year old star is eligible for both the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo) and England.When asked about his international future, he told reporters that:“I haven’t thought about that yet really.”“My dad and I will have to speak about it. We’re focusing on the club first.” he added.Speaking further, the midfielder said:“Hopefully when we start winning – I need to get that bit done – then I will have to think about where I am going to go.”Baningime was born in the Congolese capital of Kinshasa before moving to the United Kingdom. He has been at Everton’s academy since age nine.He made his Everton debut in the 2-1 defeat to Chelsea in their Carabao Cup last 16 clash as a late replacement into the starting XI for the ill Morgan Schneiderlin and went on to feature in the league for the first time as an halftime substitute during Sunday’s 2-0 loss to hosts Leicester City.Baningime also praised Everton’s caretaker coach David Unsworth for giving him the opportunity to play for the senior team. He said:“It’s just great that David Unsworth has given me the opportunity to play.”“He said ‘just do what you normally do with the ball’ and that gave me confidence. It was great. I would have wanted to win the game but that didn’t happen.” he concluded.last_img read more

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Rohr Submits His World Cup Plan To NFF

first_imgRelatedNFF Decide Gernot Rohr’s Future Following AFCON 2019 Bronze FinishJuly 31, 2019In “NFF”Only “God Of Soccer” Can Save Rohr If Eagles Fail To Win 2021 AFCON – PinnickJune 1, 2020In “2021 AFCON”Rohr Resignation Rumours Untrue – NFF SourcesJuly 13, 2017In “National Team” Super Eagles head coach Gernot Rohr has submitted his World Cup programme to the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) as the tournament scheduled for Russia next year summer edges closer.This was confirmed on Thursday by the Chairman of NFF Technical Committee, Alhaji Ahmed Yusuf Fresh before revealing that the committee will consider Rohr’s World Cup proposal and thereafter make recommendations to the NFF board.In his words via ThisDay, Fresh said: “I can confirm that Rohr has submitted his programmes. The Technical Committee will look at it and table our findings to the board. NFF will make the details of the programme public as soon as it is approved.”last_img read more

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Tinjić in Finals of Qualification for ITF Tournament in France

first_imgThe B&H tennis player Jasmina Tinjić has reached the finals of the qualifications for the ITF Tournament in Croissy-Beaubourg in France, which is being played for the award of 50.000 dollars.In the second round of the qualifications, Tinjić beat Amra Sadiković from Switzerland with 6:4, 6:2.For placement in the main drawing, Tinjić will play against Margarita Gasparian from Russia.(Source: Fena)last_img

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Oskaloosa restaurant is named for having Iowa’s Best Burger

first_imgIowans who love a juicy bacon cheeseburger will need to head for southeast Iowa and the Wood Iron Grille in Oskaloosa. The eatery is being named the winner of the 2019 Iowa’s Best Burger Contest. Kylie Peterson, at the Iowa Beef Producers Association, says there were some 500 restaurants nominated statewide, a long list that was narrowed down to ten finalists.“Ultimately, it’s the burger patty itself that’s being judged and they had the juiciest, the tastiest and the best-seasoned burger out of the top ten,” Peterson says. Iowans submitted more than six-thousand votes in the contest and a panel of judges visited each of the ten finalists, with the Oskaloosa grill coming out in first place. She says the owners were thrilled.“They’ve only been in business for about six months now so this is something they had their eyes set on from the beginning,” Peterson says. “They are just very honored and business is going to be booming for them.” The Wood Iron Original Burger features applewood smoked bacon, a sweet and tangy onion jalapeno jam and smoked cheddar cheese with a six-ounce, hand-pattied burger. Last year’s winner was Café Beaudelaire in Ames.last_img read more

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Miami Beaches and hotels to reopen June 1st

first_imgAfter much debate, commissioners in Miami Beach have agreed that they will reopen beaches to the public on June 1st.The decision was made on Friday during a meeting where city leaders expressed that they wanted nothing more than to reopen the city but that there is also a need to exercise an abundance of caution due to the ongoing pandemic:“We have to exercise some measure of caution because there is a natural tension between crowds and physical distancing,” Mayor Gelber said. “How do you manage that in a pandemic? The answer is carefully.”The mayor went on to explain why the decided to open the beaches a week after Memorial Day:“We know that Memorial Day is a traditional time for everybody to go to the beach and if we saw hundreds of thousands of people on our beaches, it would be a disaster.”While there is a delay on when beaches will reopen, retail stores, hair salons and barbershops were allowed to reopen under the phase one reopening plan for Florida.last_img read more

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ARROGATE WORKS STRONG SIX FURLONGS IN 1:12.29 IN PREPARATION FOR REMATCH WITH CALIFORNIA CHROME IN $12 MILLION PEGASUS WORLD CUP INVITATIONAL JAN. 28 AT GULFSTREAM PARK

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 15, 2017)–With Bob Baffert in contact throughout via two-way radio, Martin Garcia guided reigning Breeders’ Cup Classic Champion Arrogate through a powerful six furlong work of 1:12.29 late Sunday morning at Santa Anita.  The 4-year-old grey colt by Unbridled’s Song will have one more local work before he’s scheduled to depart for Florida in what shapes up as an epic rematch with 2014 Horse of the Year California Chrome on Saturday, Jan. 28 in the inaugural $12 million Pegasus World Cup Invitational, to be run at 1 1/8 miles, at Gulfstream Park.With jockey Martin Garcia up, Arrogate followed stablemate Uninvited onto Santa Anita’s main track via the quarter mile chute at 11:45 a.m.  The pair proceeded to gallop down the stretch and with Uninvited roughly 10 lengths in front of Arrogate, they each rounded the Club House turn and broke off from the three quarter pole.From there, Arrogate settled into a steady rhythm under Garcia and overtook Uninvited a sixteenth of a mile from the wire, and with a national audience tuned in via Santa Anita’s simulcast network, displayed the long, effortless stride that enabled him to defeat California Chrome by a half-length in the Grade I, $6 million Breeders’ Cup Classic here on Nov. 5.“It went well today, I could tell,” said Baffert, who watched the work from a private suite atop Santa Anita’s box seat area with his wife Jill, son, Bode and jockey Mike Smith.  “With every work, he’s progressing.  He’s getting closer.  We’re starting to lean on him…Martin said he was picking it up late.“It didn’t seem like he was going that fast but he was clicking right along.  I couldn’t be happier with the way we’re coming into this.  He’s right on schedule.  We just need to keep him healthy.  When you work on a muddy track (it was actually labeled “fast”), you’re always worried about their feet or something like that but…he travels really well over it.  He really likes anything.  Today, what I saw…I was really impressed…“I want to put a little breeze into him next Sunday.  Probably not as strong as this.  I’m still watching the Weather Channel and all is see is rain, rain, rain, but I’m lucky enough that we’re getting these works in here.”Santa Anita Timer Dane Nelson had Arrogate through complete splits of 23.86, 48.11, 1:00.40, 1:12.29, 1:24.82 and galloping out a flat mile in 1:37.97.With rain in the local forecast on Thursday and Friday, Arrogate is tentatively scheduled to have his final Pegasus work here next Sunday and is scheduled to be flown to Florida early Tuesday, Jan. 24.A record setting winner of the Grade I Travers Stakes in only his fifth career start on Aug. 27, Arrogate was then trained up to his Breeders’ Cup Classic win by Baffert, who is taking the same approach leading into the world’s richest race.  Owned by Juddmonte Farms, he has five wins from six starts and has earnings of $4,084,600.He’ be ridden at Gulfstream by Mike Smith, who has been aboard for his last two victories. WITH GARCIA UP, HE GOES OUT SEVEN FURLONGS IN 1:24.82 AND IS TIMED IN 1:37.97 FOR ONE MILElast_img read more

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Abelardo pulls veterania: the average age rises to 28.7 years

first_imgIt is curious, at the same time as paradoxical, that the most inexperienced player in First is the most decisive. Raúl de Tomás has barely participated in 37 games at his 25 years, although their numbers are terrifying: 18 goals. Cabrera, who only accumulates 66 matches in First, is also the safest defender So far, with the guarantee of helping to maintain the zero goal for the first time in the RCDE Stadium The last Sunday. Roca, Embarba and Jonathan Calleri do not reach those 100 matches either.The previous courser, without going any further, the average age It was close to the current one, with 28.1 years Players like Diego López, Sergio García (35) and Esteban Granero (31) were in charge of compensate the prominence of young people. Mario Hermoso, Óscar Melendo, Borja Iglesias or Roca himself were well below those figures. With more youth, Espanyol also managed to get out of its loop of negative results and manage to finish seventh. Whether younger or more adult, the whole of Abelardo sails at a good pace towards the port of salvation. EI football is topical manido, and one of the most widespread is to pull veterania to get out of complex situations, like the one that Espanyol has lived since the season began and entered swampy terrain. Abelardo Fernández is also clear about that premise, and the average age of the alignments has grown ostensibly. Players under 25 years like Adrià Pedrosa, Lluís López, Matías Vargas, Víctor Gómez, Pol Lozano, Fernando Calero or Víctor Campuzano have hardly counted for the Asturian coach so far, a statement of intentions. Bet for Javi Lopez in the right is another one of the cotton tests.The average age from the usual lineups Abelardo has grown up to 28.7 years old, with Diego Lopez such as older (38) Y Marc Roca becoming the Benjamin (23). Among them, they accumulate more than 1,500 matches in First: the starting player prototype already has 139 matches in the top category, which is equivalent to at least four seasons participating regularly. He has no novels this Espanyol. The consolidation of players like the captain (33) and Dídac Vilà (30) on the sides or the signings of Leandro Cabrera (28) and Adrián Embarba (27) also respond to this policy.last_img read more

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Drugs and sports

first_imgA drug is any substance that may affect a person’s emotional state, body function, or behaviour. Most drugs are developed for medical purposes, but they can be dangerous when misused.The misuse of drugs in sports has been around as early as the 1904 Olympics in St Louis, USA, where a marathon runner of the USA was suspected of taking drugs. At the 1960 Rome Olympics, a Danish cyclist, who had been using drugs, died of heatstroke. Issues concerning drug abuse continued throughout the years.Whatever the reasons are for taking drugs, the risks are high. Governing bodies try to prevent the misuse of drugs through coach and performer education and testing. Many drugs that are legally available contain substances that are prohibited by sports governing bodies.SOCIAL DRUGSThe drugs that are available within social situations are known as social drugs. Some are legal and widely used; others are illegal and still used by a number of persons. Social drugs are usually taken to help persons relax or to give an enjoyable experience. The most commonly used social drugs and their effects on performance are as follows: alcohol (depressant); amphetamines (stimulant); caffeine (stimulant); cannabis (depressant); cocaine (stimulant); nicotine e.g. tobacco (stimulant).Stimulants increase the heart rate and speed up the nervous system, while depressants slow down how the body works.PERFORMANCE-ENHANCING DRUGSThese are drugs that athletes specifically take to gain an unfair advantage over other competitors. Performance-enhancing drugs take many forms. They are all banned in sports and are grouped into the doping class as follows:• Anabolic agents (nandrolone, testosterone, etc) – Hormones that help repair muscle and bones. Occurs naturally in the body but also made artificially. They increase size and strength of muscles.• Narcotic analgesic (codeine, heroin, methadone) – Helps athletes compete or train even if they are injured.• Diuretics (frusumid, profenecid) – Produce rapid weight loss by reducing fluids in the body.• Peptides, hormones, analogues – Natural or artificial hormones that increase strength and size of muscles, repair damaged body tissue, and increase red blood count.• Stimulants (amphetamines, cocaine, ephedrine) – Speed up nervous system, quickening reaction; mask fatigue; and reduce pain.Some drugs are restricted in some sports but are not completely banned. These include:• Beta blockers – Keep heart rate and blood pressure low. Reduce tremor in hands.• Corticosteroids – Reduce inflammation and pain. Allow performance.• Local anaesthetics – Reduce pain, mask injury to allow performance.BLOOD DOPINGBlood doping is not an actual drug. This involves the practice of injecting blood that has been earlier removed from the athlete and stored in a refrigerator. This makes the blood cells many more than normal, thereby carrying more oxygen to the muscles. Blood doping cannot be detected but carries a high health risk.ANTI-DOPINGThe International Olympic Committee does not allow doping for three main reasons:1. To ensure that competition in sports is as fair as possible.2. To protect the health of sports people.3. To protect the image of sports.The World Anti-Doping Agency WADA) was established in 1999 to combat drugs in sports through education, strong leadership, and scientific research. The world anti-doping code has been written and ensures a common approach towards a vision where all sports are drug free. Regional Anti-Doping Agencies (RADO) have been set up.TESTINGDrug testing discourages those who might cheat, identifies performers who do cheat, and protects those who do not. Testing can take place during training and after competitions. It is carried out randomly. If a performer is selected for drug testing, there is a set procedure that is followed:1. Competitors are chosen for testing.2. Competitors go to doping-control room.3. Competitors produce urine samples.4. Samples are split and put into separate sealed containers.5. The containers are sent to the lab.6. Sample A tested.7. If negative, sample B is destroyed; if positive, the governing body of the sport investigates.8. A governing-body hearing is arranged.Athletes must let their location be known throughout the year and comply with the test by providing a blood or urine sample.It is important that performers know what is banned and the consequences if drug taking is not resisted.last_img read more

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