DONT LIKE CHÂTEAU ADDITION TOM GREEN IS HOSTING PICNIC FOR YOU

first_img.@tomgreenlive arrives at Ottawa city hall ahead of the #ChateauLaurier debate. He’s calling on councillors to “reject this architectural abomination and demand that it be redesigned” #ottnews @ctvottawa @CFRAOttawa pic.twitter.com/dhAdyeiodw— Katie Griffin (@KatieGriffinCTV) July 11, 2019 Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement TOM GREEN IS HERE TO SAVE THE CHATEAU LAURIERIn the office pool of Things That’ll Make Ottawa Melt Down This Summer, anyone bet on a proposed expansion of the Chateau Laurier? The fate of the landmark hotel, which might soon have a radiator-shaped goiter jutting out its back end, plunged Ottawa city council into disarray and attracted the likes of Ottawa hometown hero Tom Green to team preservation. Stephen Maher, writing in Maclean’s, blamed the whole fracas on Mike Harris and his pro-suburb bent. READ MOREComedian Tom Green at the Ottawa city council meeting where the decision to allow renovations to the Château Laurier was granted. ERROL MCGIHON / POSTMEDIATOM GREEN HOSTING PICNIC SATURDAY TO #SAVETHECHATEAULAURIERWhen comedian Tom Green was a teen in Ottawa, he’d skateboard back from nights in Hull and take in the capital view of the Château Laurier and Parliament Hill against the Ottawa River.“Even growing up when you’re living here and you’re used to it you’d still say to yourself: ‘Wow, how lucky are we to live in this beautiful place?’ READ MORE Advertisement Login/Register With: DON’T LIKE CHÂTEAU ADDITION? TOM GREEN HOSTING PICNIC FOR YOUOttawa comedian Tom Green is hosting a picnic Saturday evening in Major’s Hill Park to bring attention to the controversial proposed addition to the Château Laurier. He is also asking people to post pictures of the downtown hotel on social media to show officials the addition is “a bad idea” for a capital city.“You wouldn’t go build a glass addition on the edge of the Lincoln memorial. They wouldn’t go put a modern addition on the edge of an iconic American building in Washington, D.C.,” Green told CBC Radio’s Ottawa Morning on Tuesday. “So why do we feel like that’s acceptable here in the city of Ottawa?” READ MORE Actor, comedian and Ottawa native, Tom Green, went to Ottawa city hall on July 11, 2019 to oppose the addition to the Chateau Laurier hotel. (Kate Porter/CBC) Facebooklast_img read more

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Water Ministry to Construct 4 Hill Dams in Moroccos Southern Provinces

Rabat – The Minister Delegate in Charge of Water is looking to develop projects in Morocco’s southern provinces. On Tuesday, Charafat Afilal said that the water administration is firmly committed to pursuing the realization of diverse projects intended to mobilize water resources in the Sakia-El Hamra-Oued Eddahab area.The official voiced her announcement during her visit to Laayoun on Tuesday, January 16. The Minster Delegate checked on development projects launched by King Mohammed VI on the sidelines of the 40 anniversary of the Green March.The structural projects seek to accompany the flow of the rapid development in the southern provinces. “In light of the growth that the region will experience over the next few years, due to the high level of interest King Mohammed VI has in the Saharan provinces, the State Secretariat for Water, as part of its commitment to support the colossal development efforts of the region, will continue the realization of various development projects related to increasing the supply of typical water sources, as well as the use of seawater and the treatment and reuse of wastewater, said Afilal.The official chairs the board meeting of the Sakia-El Hamra-Oued Eddahab Watershed Agency, according to Maghreb Arab Press (MAP).Charafat said that the State Secretariat will soon launch the construction of four hill dams in the provinces of Laayoune, Smara, and Tarfaya with a total capacity of 1.7 million cubic meters.The official said that these dams are the Lamhajib, Sidi Ahmed Rguibi, Kssat and Labouira dams, in addition to the Foum El Oued artificial water supply project. Charafat added that these important hydro projects will mobilize additional resources to ensure that drinking water and livestock watering requirements, as well as groundwater replenishment are all kept to high standards.The Minister Delegate is also launching precautionary measures to protect the southern provinces from flooding. The water department, in collaboration with the Water Basin Agency and all the relative departments, are pursuing the implementation of these protection projects against flooding. Charafat also said that construction will begin soon to rebuild the Sakia El Hama dam, which was affected by flooding caused by heavy rainfall experienced by the region in late 2016.These projects, according to Charafat, are in addition to other projects dedicated to the region, including seawater desalination plants to supply the cities of Laayoune and Tarfaya with drinking water. read more

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Bruno Mars to Perform at 2018 Mawazine Festival in Rabat

Rabat – American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, and dancer Bruno Mars will perform at the 17th edition of Mawazine Music Festival, to be held in Rabat (June 22-30), the event’s organizer Maroc Cultures Association announced on Friday.He is a Grammy Award winner who rose to prominence with his super-hit singles like “Just the Way You Are”, “Grenade”, and “Locked Out of Heaven”.With worldwide sales of over 11 million albums and 68 million singles, he is undoubtedly, one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time. Mawazine “World Rhythms” is a music festival that takes place annually in Rabat, featuring many international and local music artists read more

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2500 Moroccan Seasonal Workers in Spain Do Not Want to Return

Rabat- Some 2,500 Moroccan seasonal workers in Spain have declared that they will not return to Morocco.In January, Spain agreed to hire 10,400 Moroccan agricultural workers to pick strawberries and other berries for the April to June harvest season. The agreement was made in a meeting between 18 representatives of agricultural firms and officials from Spain’s General Directorate for Migration.According to the Moroccan-Spanish commission, which had organized the workers’ travel, 2,500 (17 percent) of the workers have declared their wish to stay in Spain, reported news outlet Lakome. The workers were scheduled to return to their home country once the agricultural season ends. During the application process, the Moroccan government had said that it would prioritize seasonal workers who were married, have experience in the field, and were committed to returning to Morocco after the harvest.Many previous Moroccan seasonal farmers in Spain have not returned after the expiration of their contracts and are either living illegally in Spain or have become regularized.The Spanish countryside is home to workers from a number of European and South American countries. Most workers have migrated to Spain from Bulgaria, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Ukraine and Pakistan, along with others from African countries.Read Also: Moroccan Workers Denounce Abusive Spanish Farms in FranceMoroccan female workers report sexual assaultSeveral women working seasonally in Huelva province in Spain filed complaints against their employers for sexual assault in May. The US-based online media company Buzzfeed was the first to recount their stories. Later, several news outlets, including Spain’s El Mundo and El Pais, reported on the conditions of the Moroccan farmers in Huelva.Morocco’s Ministry of Employment also carried out an investigation on the Spanish farms.After a Moroccan-Spanish delegation visited the farms, the ministry maintained that “no specific case of abuse or violation against Moroccan workers was found.”In June, Moroccan and Spanish women rallied in Huelva in a march of solidarity with the seasonal workers, denouncing the alleged sexual assaults.The minister of employment, Mohamed Yatim, said on October 2 that Moroccan-Spanish cooperation on seasonal employment has “positive results.”According to Yatim, Morocco and Spain should revise the employment agreement to allow for “candidate selection procedures to be adapted to new situations and to open up new social rights for seasonal workers, including retirement.” read more

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Russia and Sri Lanka discuss militarytechnical cooperation

Russian Deputy Minister of Defence Colonel General Alexander Fomin had talks with Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Sri Lanka to the Russian Federation Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka.The Sri Lankan Embassy in Russia said that both sides discussed pressing matters of bilateral military and military-technical cooperation, and prospects for its further development. (Colombo Gazette)

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Another student wins an iPod through graduate student survey

Amanda Kirkwood is the newest winner of an iPod after participating in the Canadian Graduate and Professional Student Survey (CGPSS).Kirkwood, a master’s student in Applied Health Sciences, won the second of three iPods in the contest, which is open only to graduate students who participate in the survey.The student survey is part of the accountability framework of Ontario universities. It also helps Brock identify what it is doing well in the area of graduate education, and what needs attention in the future.The survey was distributed in January. The contest closes March 5. read more

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CSX net income revenue both slip 2 pct in 3Q as railroad

CSX net income, revenue both slip 2 pct. in 3Q as railroad hauls fewer carloads of coal, crops OMAHA, Neb. – CSX Corp. reported a 2 per cent dip in its third-quarter profit and revenue Tuesday because the railroad delivered fewer carloads of coal and crops, and fuel surcharge revenue declined.CSX said the railroad’s earnings per share actually increased 2 per cent because it had fewer shares outstanding.The Jacksonville, Fla.-based railroad made $455 million, or 44 cents per share. That’s down from $464 million, or 43 cents per share in the same period a year ago.Revenue fell 2 per cent to $2.89 billion as the mix of goods it carried changed. Total volume was down about 1 per cent.Analysts surveyed by FactSet expected CSX to report earnings of 43 cents per share on $2.94 billion revenue.Freight railroads’ results are watched closely because the number of carloads of goods they carry offer clues about the health of the nation’s economy. CSX is the first major railroad to report.CSX said strong increases in shipments of export coal, automotive shipments and intermodal containers helped offset weak demand for coal from domestic utilities.CSX hauled 29 per cent less coal domestically in the quarter, but saw a 25 per cent jump in its export coal tonnage. Overall, CSX hauled 36.3 million tons of coal in this year’s quarter, down from 43.3 million tons in 2011.“CSX continues to respond well to moderating economic conditions and challenges in our domestic coal business,” said Michael Ward, CSX’s chairman, president and CEO.Throughout 2012, coal demand has generally been weak because of last year’s mild winter and some utilities’ shift from burning coal to cheaper natural gas.CSX officials said they still expect 2012 earnings to improve over last year. Through the first nine months of 2012, CSX reported $1.41 billion net income, or $1.36 per share. That’s four per cent higher than last year’s $1.37 billion net income, or $1.24 per share.CSX, based in Jacksonville, Fla., operates over 21,000 miles of track in 23 eastern states and two Canadian provinces.Union Pacific Corp., the biggest railroad in the U.S., will release its third-quarter results on Thursday.CSX shares rose nearly 2 per cent to $22.01 in after-hours trading.___Follow Josh Funk online at www.twitter.com/funkwrite___Online:CSX Corp.: www.csx.com by News Staff Posted Oct 16, 2012 5:28 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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Last Years Warriors Werent The Best Ever But This Years Might Be

There was plenty of “greatest of all time” speculation swirling around the Golden State Warriors at this time last year, as they tore through the Western Conference after breaking the 1995-96 Chicago Bulls’ record for regular-season victories. As it turns out, though, the Warriors weren’t even the greatest team of the 2015-16 season, since they lost to the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals. I suppose we all learned our collective lesson, because there hasn’t been anywhere near as much GOAT chatter this time around.The irony, of course, is that this version of the Warriors might actually be the best NBA team ever. Although they “only” won 67 games during the regular season, the 2016-17 Warriors had a better schedule-adjusted point differential than they did in their 73-win season, and then they rattled off what is so far the most dominant postseason of any team in recent memory (including the fabled 2001 L.A. Lakers).And if they can take care of Cleveland without much trouble in Game 1 of the NBA Finals, they’ll officially become the GOAT — at least, according to the Elo ratings, our pet system for judging an NBA team’s strength at any given moment.As my boss wrote on Saturday, the LeBron James Cavaliers have had a tendency to make Elo look silly. But by now, Elo has learned from its mistakes and is (mostly) giving Cleveland its due. The main reason our prediction system is still giving the Cavs a minuscule 10 percent chance of defending their championship, then, is that the Warriors are just so ridiculously dominant.Golden State’s Elo rating is currently 1850.5, which ranks second in NBA history to the peak rating of the ’96 Bulls (1853.1) — which was set after Chicago took a 3-0 lead over the Seattle SuperSonics in the NBA Finals. (The Bulls’ Elo would dip to a final rating of 1823 after they lost two of the next three games to the Sonics.) 6Bulls1996-972/4/97471811.3 TEAMSEASONDATEGAME NO.DURING PLAYOFFS?ELO To surpass those Bulls and set a new peak-Elo record of 1853.2, the Warriors would need to prevail by eight or more on Thursday night. That’s far from an unreasonable goal; Golden State has the superior rating and is at home, so Elo actually considers them nine-point favorites for Game 1. (The Las Vegas betting line for Game 1 has the Warriors winning by seven.) According to research by Wayne Winston and Jeff Sagarin, the probability of a nine-point NBA favorite winning by at least eight is about 54 percent.But even if Cleveland plays the Warriors close in Game 1, a new Elo record is inevitable as long as Golden State keeps winning. A string of one-point victories in Games 1 through 3 would be enough to push the Warriors past the Bulls’ mark with at least a game to spare in the series. But any loss could be a major setback for the record-breaking bid. Even a three-point loss in Game 1 would need to be followed by four straight four-point wins to pull Golden State ahead of Chicago; a stray double-digit loss would require four 10-point wins in a row. And two losses in the series might prove too much for the Warriors to overcome unless they also rack up offsetting blowout wins, particularly if the Cavs’ wins are spaced apart in the series (Elo gives more weight to more recent games).Then again, it’s also possible that the Warriors could set an all-time peak Elo record after Game 1 and then the Cavs could rally back to win the series. In that scenario, Golden State’s season would parallel that of the 2007 New England Patriots, who set the NFL’s peak Elo record when they rattled off 18 straight wins before losing the Super Bowl. We’re guessing the Warriors would probably rather have the title. 7Spurs2015-163/19/16691800.1 1Bulls1995-966/9/9697✓1853.1 3Warriors2015-1612/11/15241838.6 9Bulls1997-986/10/98101✓1788.3 8Lakers2008-096/14/09105✓1790.0 Source: ESPN, Basketball-Reference.com The best peak Elo ratings in NBA history 10Pistons1988-896/13/8999✓1788.1 5Celtics1985-865/29/8696✓1815.7 4Warriors2014-156/16/15103✓1822.3 2Warriors2016-175/22/1794✓1850.5 read more

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Softball Ohio State starting Big Ten climb on the road at Michigan

OSU sophomore Emily Clark (20) tags Rutgers freshman Nicole Bowman (88) for an out during the game against Rutgers on April 1 at Buckeye field. Credit: Emily Hetterscheidt | For The LanternAfter getting a 3-2 win at Pittsburgh on Tuesday, the No. 25 Ohio State women’s softball team is on the road again. This weekend, the team is traveling to East Lansing for a three-game series against the Spartans.The Buckeyes are currently 27-11 overall and 10-4 in the Big Ten, with a 9-3 mark in road conference contests. Michigan State is 21-17 overall and 5-8 in the conference play. “Michigan State always shows up to play,” OSU junior Becca Gavin said. “It’s one of those games where you can never underestimate an opponent based on their rank or how they’re playing.”OSU leads the all-time record between the conference opponents, 66-43, and is 9-2 against Michigan State since 2013.  The last time the Buckeyes made the trip to East Lansing, they swept the Spartans in a three-game series. Home or away, playing any Big Ten team is hard, junior outfielder Bailee Sturgeon said. In order to come out of Secchia Stadium with some Big Ten wins, the Buckeyes need to focus on defense and pitching.The Spartans have some powerful forces at bat, with junior outfielder Lea Foerster leading the way. Foerster has a .395 batting average and is first in the Big Ten in doubles (15) and runs scored (47). Michigan State sophomore Ebonee Echols ranks No. 1 in the NCAA with 11 triples, the most of any Big Ten player since 1999. For OSU, sophomore infielder Lilli Piper leads the team with a .405 batting average, 42 RBI and 51 hits.  Senior outfielder Alex Bayne has notched the most Buckeye home runs with 13 and has a .336 batting average. Six players from the Scarlet and Gray batting lineup have an average of .300 or better. “We don’t fall off when we get to the bottom of our order,” said OSU coach Kelly Kovach Schoenly. “The bottom of our order is very strong so it could be them stepping up, it could be the middle, it could be the top.”Even if Michigan State gets some big hits, it’s vital for the OSU to keep its composure on the mound, Kovach Schoenly said. In the Buckeyes’ win over Pittsburgh, senior pitcher Shelby Hursh registered her 11th win and had eight strikeouts, six of which were the final out of the inning. “If she could do that every inning, that would make me happy,” Kovach Schoenly said. “I think she’s starting to pitch some of the best she’s pitched in her career right now and I’m really proud of the way she’s handled the pressure.”Hursh is 11-4 with a 2.24 ERA (2.81 in conference). She has pitched in 97 innings and has five shutout victories.Michigan State junior pitcher Bridgette Rainey is 12-7 with a 4.32 ERA. Rainey has recorded 105 strikeouts in her 95.2 innings pitched so far this season.Last season, the Spartans made the trek to Columbus and took the series, 2-1. Now, the Buckeyes are looking to take back the series. “Our focus going into these games is definitely getting back to finding our competitive edge, finding that aggressiveness that we came out the beginning of the season with and getting back to our fundamentals defensively and offensively,” Gavin said. read more

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Radical plans to ease NHS 999 targets amid mounting pressures

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The number of calls received by ambulance services in England has risen by 20 per cent since 2011/12Credit:Dinendra Haria/REX/Shutterstock Prof Willett said the current system was “outdated” and in need of a major overhaul. Ambulances In the winter of 2014/15, up to 20,000 patients were subject to deliberate delays under a secret policy authorised by the head of South East Coast Ambulance trust, which forced high risk cases to wait up to twice as long if their call was referred from the 111 helpline. In 2016/17, ambulance services in England received 9.8m calls – a 20 per cent rise from the 8.2m received in 2011/12.Just 69 per cent of Red 1 calls (the most urgent category) received a response within eight minutes in 2016/17, compared with 74 per cent performance in 2011/12.In recent years, ambulance services have been beset by a number of scandals, with some accused of fiddling their response times, in an attempt to claim targets have been hit. Jeremy Hunt  Prof Keith Willett, NHS England director of acute care, said six NHS pilot schemes, evaluated by the University of Sheffield, provided “very compelling” evidence that changing the system would improve patient safety.Ministers are expected to discuss the findings shortly, with reforms of the 999 system likely by next year. The most urgent cases – those involving patients who are unconscious or not breathing – would still be sent an immediate response.The study by NHS trusts is the largest research into urgent and emergency care in the world, and assessed 10 million calls.“Once every two decades, we get a real opportunity to modernise the ambulance service. We have an evidence base now,” Prof Willett told a meeting of NHS managers.“We have something we know is safe and evidence of improved efficiency. From my point of view, it is very compelling”.While current targets say 75 per cent of calls classed as “life threatening” should receive a response in eight minutes, just three per cent of patients turned out to need such an urgent response, Prof Willett said.On average, on in four “blue light” ambulances sent out are stood down before they arrive, often because multiple vehicles have been sent out, or because the case turned out not to be so serious. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary. Decisions on reforms of ambulance targets will be discussed by health ministers Credit:PA Ambulances are set to be given far longer to reach 999 calls in a controversial bid to ease increasing pressures on emergency services.Handlers could be given four times as long to assess calls after a study of 10 million calls found too many cases being counted as hitting official targets, without patients getting the help they need.Current rules state that 75 per cent of calls classed as life-threatening are supposed to receive a response within eight minutes. Before the clock starts, handlers have just 60 seconds to gather information – meaning they often send a response before crucial details have been established.The targets, introduced by Labour, can be hit if a “first responder” on a bike gets to the scene quickly – even if the patient is a stroke victim in need of an ambulance to convey them to hospital.And trusts are routinely sending multiple responses out, in the hope one will beat the clock.Under new plans, handlers are likely to be given up to four minutes to assess calls – four times as long as the existing rules.Government sources said there was a growing clinical consensus that giving call handlers longer to assess calls meant the most urgent cases actually got the right help quicker. A Government source said the evidence appeared persuasive, though the final draft of the review has yet to be sent to ministers.“There seems to be a clear clinical consensus on this,” he said. “At the moment we have a system where the clock stops when a responder on a bike reaches the patient – even it if turns out to be a stroke victim who will obviously need an ambulance.”The review follows major strain across ambulance and Accident & Emergency services, with a 6000 per cent rise in the numbers stuck on trolleys for more than 12 hours in the last seven years.Record occupancy levels in hospitals mean increasing numbers are being forced to wait longer in A&E, leaving ambulances queueing outside, and teams of paramedics spending hours waiting with patients.last_img read more

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75yearold man becomes fifth person to die after Westminster attack

first_img Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 39 Comments Image: Yui Mok/AP Image: Yui Mok/AP http://jrnl.ie/3303887 Thursday 23 Mar 2017, 9:33 PM 75-year-old man becomes fifth person to die after Westminster attack He was pronounced dead tonight after his life support was withdrawn. 26,231 Views Earlier today it was confirmed that Englishman Masood was the alleged attacker. Met Police said in a statement that Masood was known by “a number of aliases” and had been living in the West Midlands, which includes the city of Birmingham, where there was an armed police raid overnight.The IS group said it was responsible, according to the Amaq propaganda agency, its first claim of an attack on British soil., however, no links have been found between Masood and the group.One of the victims was named as British citizen Aysha Frade. Media reports said she was on her way to pick up her two daughters, aged seven and nine, from school.Kurt Cochran, from the United States, was named as the third victim by President Donald Trump, who called him a “great American”.Read: Westminster attacker was 52-year-old Khalid Masoodcenter_img Short URL THE METROPOLITAN POLICE has confirmed that a 75-year-old man has become the fourth fatal victim of yesterday’s Westminster attack.The man had been critically injured on Westminster Bridge after Khalid Masood drove a 4×4 into pedestrians. Masood was also killed after stabbing police officer Keith Palmer to death.He was pronounced dead tonight after his life support was withdrawn. Mar 23rd 2017, 9:33 PM Share237 Tweet Email1 By Paul Hosford Detectives investigating the terrorist attack in #Westminster can confirm that a 75yo man died tonight after his life support was withdrawn.— Metropolitan Police (@metpoliceuk) March 23, 2017 Source: Metropolitan Police/Twitterlast_img read more

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Thierry Henry linked to Monaco job

first_imgFormer French champions Monaco are considering to bring in Thierry Henry as a manager after making contact with his representatives.Monaco are keen to name the former Barcelona player as the new first-team boss, after their poor start to the campaign under Leonardo Jardim, winning only one game in their first nine.The Monegasque side who won the Ligue 1 back in 2016-17 are currently in 18th place, having lost their last three consecutive league fixtures.Neymar, BrazilTop 5 Ligue 1 players to watch throughout next weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Top 5 players to watch in Ligue 1 next…Another man linked to the Job is former Foxes boss Claudio Ranieri, who defied to the odds to win the Premier League with Leicester according to Sky Sports.Ranieri is understood to be happy to consider a return to the club he once managed, though it also looking for a potential return to the Premier League.Reports in France had widely linked Henry with a return to his former club but Sky Sports News understands he is not the only candidate Monaco are looking at.last_img read more

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Report Ibrahimovic close to AC Milan sixmonth loan deal

first_imgZlatan Ibrahimovic is reportedly closing in on an AC Milan comeback with a six-month loan deal at the start of the January transfer windowThe Swedish superstar confessed this week that Milan are interested in bringing him back to the San Siro.The move has been endorsed by the likes of former midfielder Demetrio Albertini, who believes signing Ibrahimovic is a no-brainer.Now La Gazzetta dello Sport claim that Ibrahimovic’s reunion at Milan is set to go ahead with the option of it becoming a permanent stay in July.Earlier this week, the LA Galaxy striker spoke of Milan’s interest but refused to give away any details on the transfer.“There’s interest, but I’d be fine spending another year in LA. It’s no secret that Milan like me,” Ibrahimovic told Vanity Fair.“I had two wonderful years there and didn’t want to leave, but they “forced” me to go to Paris.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.‘We won things, I ran out top scorer at a great club with a great atmosphere, plus the old guard was still there.“They were an incredible group of players, with whom I was lucky to play and win. And I know what it means to win in Italy. Winning is everything.“I’ve played for the three biggest clubs in Italy: Juventus, Milan and Inter. Milan treated me well: I came from Barcelona, where I’d experienced sadness, but Milan put a smile back on my face. I wanted to repay them.“I won’t say “no” and I won’t say “yes”. We’ll see… [Gennaro] Gattuso was a great player and is a great coach.”Ibrahimovic managed 56 goals and 24 assists in 85 appearances across all competitions for Milan.In his two-year stay, Ibrahimovic won the Serie A and Italian Super Cup titles.last_img read more

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77 of employers view workplace pension as an important benefit

first_imgMore than three-quarters (77%) of employer respondents believe a workplace pension is an important employee benefit, according to research by Royal London.Its survey of 325 organisations, which typically employ between 10 and 250 employees, also found that 66% of respondents would be prepared to facilitate employees increasing their pension contribution rates when they receive pay increases.The research also found:78% of respondents care about workplace pensions.62% of respondents would be likely to match increases in employees’ pension contribution rates that are linked to pay rises.35% of respondents believe the main responsibility for boosting workplace saving lies with the employee, compared to 30% who cite that pension providers should take the main responsibility for increasing workplace savings.18% of respondents feel that the government should own the main responsibility for boosting workplace savings, compared to employers themselves (6%) or advisers (5%).Steve Webb (pictured), director of policy at Royal London, said: “Although employers have many other things to concentrate on, they have a crucial part to play in nudging their workforce to save more.“Most experts agree that the 8% total contribution rate which will be reached in 2019 will not be enough to provide a comfortable retirement for most [employees] on middle and higher incomes. The willingness of employers to consider automatic escalation of contributions to coincide with pay increases is very encouraging. This approach has worked well in the US and in some leading UK [organisations] and offers the best prospect of getting contribution rates up to realistic levels.“To continue the success of automatic enrolment, schemes must be reviewed so that employer’s needs and long-term goals are met. But it’s not just about the scheme that’s in place; it’s about how its benefits are communicated to employees. Employers, under the guidance of financial advice, must look to send out regular and engaging communications to their staff to actively encourage them to save more.”last_img read more

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Homer Woman Arrested For Using Fake Currency In Anchor Point

first_imgThe cashier provided a description of the driver and vehicle. Troopers located the vehicle in Anchor Point. On February 2, a suspect was identified however she was not located at that time. On the following day Troopers received a report that a female had used fake currency to pay for a drink at Black Water Bend Espresso. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Alaska State Troopers received a report of a female who had tried to use fake currency to buy items at the Anchor River Store on two separate occasions. She was arrested and remanded into the Homer Jail. According to the Trooper dispatch, an investigation revealed Rheanna Tussey, 24, of Homer used fake currency to purchase a drink and she was in possession of large quantity of other fake bills.last_img read more

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Myanmar tells UN Rakhine situation improving

first_imgVice President of Myanmar Henry Van Thio addresses the UN General Assembly at the United Nations on Wednesday. Photo: AFPMyanmar insisted Wednesday to the United Nations that the crisis in violence-torn Rakhine state was easing after heavy international criticism.Myanmar’s second vice president Henry Van Thio addressed the annual UN General Assembly in the place of leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who a day earlier delivered a speech calling for patience.Van Thio’s remarks are even less likely than Suu Kyi’s to mollify global concerns as he questioned the reasons for the flight of members of the Rohingya Muslim minority.“I am happy to inform you that the situation has improved,” Van Thio said in his address, saying there have been no clashes since 5 September.“Accordingly, we are concerned by reports that the numbers of Muslims crossing into Bangladesh remain unabated. We would need to find out the reason for this exodus,” he said.The United Nations says more than 420,000 Rohingya have fled for safety to Bangladesh in the face of an army campaign that includes the burning of villages and rape.French President Emmanuel Macron earlier Wednesday described the campaign as genocide.Van Thio did not use the term Rohingya, referring to them simply as Muslims. The Rohingya are widely reviled in the Buddhist-majority country.Van Thio noted that the army campaign came in response to a rebel attack and said that non-Muslims have also suffered.But Myanmar’s third-in-command thanked foreign countries for support, not referring directly to their criticism.“Humanitarian assistance is our first priority. We are committed to ensuring that aid is received by all those in need, without discrimination,” Van Thio said.Suu Kyi’s stance has disheartened human rights groups who had campaigned for her freedom during the Nobel Peace Prize winner’s 15 years under house arrest by a military junta.But analysts say that Suu Kyi, while now the country’s leader, may not be able to curb the army even if she took the political risk of speaking out.last_img read more

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Gas cylinder blast fire kills woman

first_imgChandpur mapA woman was killed in a fire that originated from a gas cylinder explosion at Lakshmipur village in Matlab Dakkhin upazila on Sunday evening.The deceased was Milon Begum, 50 wife of Mostafa Mia of the village.Locals said the fire originated around 7:00pm after the gas cylinder exploded at the kitchen.Milon Begum was burned alive as she tried to bring out valuables defying warning, said officer-in-charge of Matlab Dakkhin police station Iqbal Hossain.On information, firefighters rushed in and brought the fire under control after one hour, he said, adding that they recovered the charred body of the woman.last_img read more

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An Equal Opportunity Storm Harvey Didnt Spare Anyone

first_imgCharlie Riedel, APLois Rose looks over belongings while salvaging items from her flood-damaged house Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, in Houston. The city continues to recover from record flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey.Harvey did not discriminate in its destruction.It raged through neighborhoods rich and poor, black and white, upscale and working class. Across Houston and surrounding communities, no group sidestepped its paralyzing deluges and apocalyptic floods.“Harvey didn’t spare anyone: The whole city is traumatized,” said Lynnette Borrel, whose backyard pool filled with murky water and schools of minnows from Brays Bayou on the city’s southwest side not far from downtown.Far to the northeast edge of the sprawling city, a flotilla of boats rescued affluent residents of the pine forest villages of charming Kingwood — psychologists, doctors, business owners. And on the far west side, the release of storm water from the Addicks and Barker reservoirs pushed a devastating tide into some of Houston’s more wealthy neighborhoods. Clear across town to the southeast, low-slung brick and clapboard homes in the heavily African-American and Hispanic Lockwood area were swamped. Missouri City, home to Houston’s largest Asian population, endured more than 40 inches of rain.Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, fearing that a full-fledged evacuation of the nation’s fourth-largest city in the face of the oncoming storm would be dangerous, advised residents to remain in place. So when Harvey submerged roughly 70 percent of the land mass in Harris County, all demographics were inundated.The poor tend to suffer most in disasters. After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the world was left with nightmarish images of residents of New Orleans’ impoverished Lower Ninth Ward, screaming for help from their rooftops. That storm, which claimed 1,800 lives, stands as a prime example of urban inequality and environmental injustice.And there is every expectation that Houston’s poor and working class, lacking the resources of the affluent, will struggle most to rebuild.But in this moment, as the waters begin to recede, Houston residents of all colors and socio-economic statuses find themselves united in their loss, their despair — and their resilience.Lois Rose, a 55-year-old school teacher in northwest Houston, knew she had to leave her home in the east when the rising floodwater in her living room began lapping at her calves. Outside, it nearly reached her neck. She and her panicked neighbors formed a human chain, battling against the push of brown water and powerful currents to make their way to a gas station on higher ground. Frightened and shivering, they waited in the dark and in 3 feet of water for seven hours before they were rescued.Rose’s home of 25 years, in a predominantly African American and Hispanic area, had been flooded by a storm twice before. But when she was taken to the city’s primary disaster shelter, all she had to do was look around to realize that Harvey was something else entirely.“Every nationality you could see was in the George R. Brown Convention Center,” she said. “Harvey hit everywhere. It’s not just one section of Houston where people were displaced. It’s everywhere, from southwest to northwest, southeast to northeast. It hit the lowest-income areas to the richest. It just didn’t stop. This was just different. It’s going to take years to recover from this.”Rose returned home on Thursday. Her parlor, where she puzzled out problems she had with her students, was ravaged; her beloved antique lamps with fringed shades and ceramic statues of women in flowing robes were ruined, as were her chairs, couches, clothes, a brand new big-screen television.Her eyes were glassy when she spotted the topper to her wedding cake in the corner, soaked through.“Part of me wants to cry,” she said. “The other part of me knows I need to pull myself up.”Down the block, welder Ivy Anderson also came home to find his house and belongings destroyed. As the storm raged, he’d carried his mother on his back through the treacherous flood, and watched his home fill up with water he knew would cause horrible damage. The house had flooded during Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, but he had flood insurance back then. Not this time.“I’m counting on FEMA,” he said. “If FEMA can’t help, I don’t know if I’ll be able to rebuild. It hurts. This has been my home for 18 years. It hurts.”Twenty-two miles away, in the Meyerland neighborhood of quiet, leafy streets, Barron Lazano picked through her own wreckage. Flood insurance is required to get a mortgage in Meyerland, she said, and it’s been an invaluable safety net.Lazano and her husband, an architect, left before the storm hit — she didn’t want to take the chance of getting stuck. Last year, her home flooded on Tax Day — 10 inches. The year before, it flooded on Memorial Day — 20 inches. They’d been back in the house after their most recent remodel for just six weeks before Harvey.“We thought if we got 3 feet, we’d be OK,” she said. They weren’t OK. They got more than 4.Outside her home, its insides were piled high: new chairs, a new couch, a top-of-the-line refrigerator, just purchased.“We just don’t know what we’re going to do,” she said, pausing to take stock. “The scale of this is absolutely unbelievable: It’s hard for us, but it’s harder to look around and see that everybody else has flooded, too. Insurance is huge — we wouldn’t be able to rebuild it if we didn’t —but we don’t know if we want to go through this again.”In Edgebrook, near South Houston, Spanish tunes leaked out of a sound system on Lakewood Drive, as families slowly made their way home. The sun baked the sidewalk; bit by bit, it evaporated water still pooling in the gutter.Patricia Hahn, an administrator for a dialysis company, sat in the back of a pickup truck in her driveway. Beside her were plastic bins and boxes, filled with whatever she could salvage from inside — books and DVDs, photographs, odds and ends in plastic bags.The pile was modest, compared to her refuse. Her wardrobe. A pair of brand new Laz-E Boy recliners she’d ordered back in 2016, delivered just two months before the storm; she’d even kept them wrapped in plastic. A green couch that had belonged to her husband, Curtiss. He died three years ago on Nov. 8, the couple’s shared birthday. She hung her head and quietly cried.A native of Houston, Hahn said she’s only ever received a few inches of water in the garage, even in the fiercest storms: “Never in my life, never ever in my life, has this house had this much water.”Hahn rode out the storm on the second floor, while water rushed into the first. As neighbor after neighbor waded through chest-deep water, Hahn kept a watchful eye over her neighborhood. But when the floodwaters receded, she realized that she had almost nothing left. Even the boxes of her late husband’s belongings that she’d tucked away as mementoes were destroyed.“This has been a hard reset for me,” she said through tears. “It’s always been hard for me to go through his stuff. Now it’s gone.”“I, more or less, have lost everything,” she said. “But I have to face up to my challenges.”She doesn’t have flood insurance, but is determined to recover. Houston will too, she said.“This storm affected the poor, the rich, and those in the middle,” she said, “but our Texans, our community, we’re going to do whatever it takes.”___AP data journalist Angeliki Kastanis contributed to this report. Sharelast_img read more

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New insights into ancient life Chromosome segregation in Archaea

first_img Copyright 2012 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Initially termed Archaebacteria (due to their typical but not universal morphological similarity to bacteria), the Archaea – found in a wider range of extreme as well as surprisingly mundane environments (such as bovine intestines) than first thought – are biochemically and genetically distinct from bacteria and eukaryotes, resulting in the current three-kingdom system of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. (Note that viruses are not organisms as defined by these three groups, and so constitute a fourth biological group.) Being hard to culture, little has been known about the genetic process by which they undergo chromosome segregation – a crucial step in species survival in which chromosomes pair off with their similar chromosomes, thereby ensuring that genetic material is accurately distributed to the next generation. Recently, however, scientists at the University of York and the Max Planck Institute in Marburg found that the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus uses a hybrid segrosome consisting of two proteins known as SegA and SegB.The research team, led by Daniela Barillà in the Department of Biology at the University of York, and including lead author Anne K. Kalliomaa-Sanford and other researchers, faced several challenges in studying Archaea. “When we started this project,” Barillà tells PhysOrg, “all we knew was that the chromosome of Sulfolobus solfataricus harbored a gene, sso0034, related to bacterial genes involved in genome segregation. By inspecting the nearby DNA region, we noticed that the gene was followed by a short gene of unknown function, named sso0035. The intriguing thing was that the two genes were partially overlapping and, specifically, the end of sso0034 overlapped with the start of sso0035.” To the scientists, this architecture suggested that the two genes encoded proteins involved in the same biological process – meaning that one of their major challenges was to discover the function of the two proteins starting from scratch. “It’s like being at a crime scene,” says Barillà. “You have a few clues and you build on them to construct a jigsaw that reveals the final picture.” “We made an educated guess based on what is known for bacterial DNA segregation proteins and found out that SegB binds to specific sites on the chromosome,” she continues. “We employed microscopy to visualize cells in which we induced, if you will, an overdose of SegA and SegB, which resulted in numerous cells without chromosomes. When we induced a corresponding overdose of the DNA-binding protein SegB only, we observed fragmented, split chromosomes.” These findings indicated that the SegAB complex is involved in chromosome segregation in the thermophilic, or heat-loving, archaeon S. solfataricus. One of the team’s key insights was the discovery that SegA polymerizes into filamentous structures upon binding ATP together with the finding that SegB promotes SegA assembly into polymers. “To investigate this aspect,” Barillà recounts, “we used dynamic light scattering. This method allowed us to determine the size of particles in solution on the basis of the amount of light that the particles scatter.” In fact, when a beam of laser light hits molecules in solution, each molecule will scatter back a certain amount of light that is proportional to its size: the larger the molecule, the higher the intensity of scattered light. “This technique is great, as it allowed us to detect SegA polymerization in real time. As soon as the protein binds the small ligand ATP, it instantaneously grows into polymers – that is, long particles scattering a large amount of light. It’s quite exciting to see this process in real time, while it’s actually happening.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The team used genetics and biochemistry to shed light on the role of the two proteins that they named SegA and SegB for chromosome segregation. “It was relatively straightforward to characterize SegA, as the protein contains a distinctive signature, known as Walker motif,” Barillà explains. “This consists of a short stretch of building blocks or amino acids that bind a small ligand called ATP. We’ve shown that SegA is able to bind ATP and to convert it into a smaller molecule, ADP.” While the binding of ATP and the conversion into ADP are crucial activities for the function of SegA, understanding the role of SegB was trickier: they suspected that this protein might be a DNA-binding protein. However, the problem was to find the site that the protein potentially bound to on the chromosome. Recognizing blood poisoning quickly (PhysOrg.com) — The effort to classify life into various groups has been a bumpy ride. Prior to the 1900s, living things were usually pegged as either plants or animals – period. By the middle of the 20th century, however, it was asserted that this scheme did not adequately represent fungi, bacteria and protists, leading to a five-group classification – Monera (bacteria), Protista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia. At roughly the same time, however, a fundamental distinction between prokaryotic bacteria and the four eukaryotic kingdoms (plants, animals, fungi, and protists) based on nuclei, cytoskeleton, internal membranes, and other shared eukaryote characteristics – for example, unlike eukaryotes, their genetic material is not wrapped by a membrane into a separate compartment – was acknowledged, resulting in a different system – and considerable confusion. Then, things changed anew when an entirely new prokaryotic group – the so-called third domain of life, living in high temperatures and producing methane – was discovered in the late 1970s. Increased gene dosage of segA and segB results in a high rate of anucleate cells and anomalousnucleoid morphology in S. solfataricus. Phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy of stained cells expressing higher levels of segAB and segA (A) or segA-K14Q (C). The arrows point to anucleate cells. Bar Ľ 2 μm. (B) Examples of aberrant chromosome segregation phenotypes observed for the strain with increased levels of SegAB. Bar Ľ 1 μm. Image Copyright © PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1113384109center_img Explore further More information: Chromosome segregation in Archaea mediated by a hybrid DNA partition machine, Published online before print February 21, 2012, PNAS March 6, 2012 vol. 109 no. 10 3754-3759, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1113384109 Going forward, Barillà points out, there’s a lot that can be done to investigate the nature and dynamics of the SegA polymers with dynamic light scattering. “In parallel, we’d like to visualize the filaments using electron microscopy, which is able to provide high-resolution images of individual particles. Moreover, we’d like to further investigate the interplay between SegA and the partner SegB to understand how the latter protein affects SegA behavior. The fact that SegA assembles into filaments in vitro suggests that in vivo it may form cytoskeletal structures involved in moving and delivering newly duplicated chromosomes to specific subcellular locations – so that, when the cell divides, each daughter cell inherits one chromosome. Therefore, we also intend to examine the localization of the proteins in S. solfataricus cells to shed light on what happens in vivo.”Barillà also points out that in silico modeling is a possible avenue of investigation. “However,” she adds, “I think that this step would be a bit premature at this stage, as we need to learn more about this system. If we discover that SegA functions as a cytoskeletal motor protein in the cell, then a bioinformatic model would help to rationalize the potential dynamics of this factor within the cell.”In addition, Barillà notes that the team’s discoveries are basic science findings that will not lead directly to new therapies for combating pathological conditions, because S. solfataricus and all the other members of the archaea phylum are non-pathogenic microorganisms that cause no infectious diseases. However, she adds, from an evolutionary and biotechnological standpoint, archaea are a terrific and exciting group of organisms. “They’ve generated considerable interest because of their ability to adapt to life under extreme conditions like very high or low temperatures, very acidic and alkaline pH and high salinity. Their unusual properties make these organisms a valuable and, so far, under-exploited resource in the development of novel biotechnological processes.” Potential industrial applications span from thermostable proteolytic enzymes to food-processing enzymes, from biomining to cellulose degrading enzymes, from bioremediation to the use of archaeal liposomes as carrier vehicles in vaccine formulation, or as delivery systems for drugs or genes.“Going back to our findings,” Barillà concludes, “I think that SegA is an interesting object from a biotechnology viewpoint, as it is extremely thermostable – it remains a nicely folded and functional protein at high temperatures – and is able to polymerize. These two properties make SegA an interesting biocompatible material for a new generation of scaffolds for tissue engineering.” Phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy of stained S. solfataricus showing cells without chromosome. Bar = 2 μm. Image courtesy D. Barilla. Citation: New insights into ancient life: Chromosome segregation in Archaea (2012, March 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-insights-ancient-life-chromosome-segregation.html Phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy of stained cells expressing higher levels of either segAB or segA. Examples of aberrant chromosome segregation phenotypes observed for the strain carrying the segAB (A), the segA (B), or segA-K14Q (C) expressing construct. Bar Ľ 1 μm. Image Copyright © PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1113384109last_img read more

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