Burrell not keen on top CONCACAF job

first_img Give others a chance Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) president, Captain Horace Burrell, revealed that given the recent corruption investigations which rocked world football and threw the regional body into chaos following the arrest two former presidents, he is not keen to be head of CONCACAF. Caymanians Jeffrey Webb and Alfredo Hawit have been arrested in football’s ongoing scandal and another former CONCACAF president, Trinidad and Tobago’s Austin ‘Jack’ Warner, has been implicated in the corruption probe, with a US extradition request sent to his Government. The JFF boss, in the past, had declared his ambitions to assume the CONCACAF top job. He was recently appointed to an interim CONCACAF body to govern the affairs of the region’s football until a new president is elected at the confederation’s next congress in Mexico City in May. However, Burrell now insists that to be president of two demanding associations would be time-consuming and challenging. “Look at what people have been saying? So I won’t hang around until I am thrown out,” Burrell noted. “Many people now want the post, so at times you have to step back and give others who have asked for the opportunity the chance to serve,” he told The Gleaner. “I have a business which I have built for many years, and it’s time to start paying attention to that. After a while, you realise that you need time for family, business and other things,” he added. “I am not going to step back fully (from football administration), I will always be around. Right now, I am the JFF president and I am going back for another four years, as I have been nominated unopposed. “That, in itself, is a lot of commitment and to give that commitment to the regional body is going to take up more of the time. So to hold both posts is a huge task. “Right now, I am a vice-president of the organisation (CONCACAF), but to vie for the head would mean complete devotion, and with my federation, business and family, it would be very difficult,” he explained. CONCACAF’S interim committee comprises Justino Compean (Mexico), Sunil Gulati (USA), Pedro Chaluja (Panama), Luis Hernandez (Cuba), Victor Montagliani (Canada) and Sonia Bien-AimÈ (Turks & Caicos) and Burrell. The Jamaican said the focus is to rebuild the organisation’s reputation and get reforms. “We have collectively decided to remain as one strong body, to operate as a unit until next May when the election is due. This was a unanimous decision and we have been pursuing a number of reforms to make the confederation emerge stronger. “We feel it is the right thing to do and we are certain that in the months ahead, things will return to normal and the confederation will be much stronger and transparent,” he commented. “This is a voluntary position and times may come when others want an opportunity and they should be given the opportunity. But at this time, I am just concentrating on working with the group, getting the reforms in place and passed by congress, so that when we go forward, the problems that we have experienced recently, the reform process will prevent a lot of these from happening again,” he stated.last_img read more

Read More →

Excelsior rally against Mona

first_imgExcelsior came from two goals down to earn a 2-2 draw with Mona High in their ISSA/Jamaica Hockey Federation (JHF) under-19 Group A game at the Mona hockey field yesterday, ahead of a top-of-the-table clash with group leaders, Jamaica College. In the other Group A game, Kingston College and Papine High battled to a 1-1 draw. In the feature match, Mona jumped in front after 11 minutes thanks to Knocazchi Smith, who fired home from close-range. They extended their lead to 2-0 after 22 minutes through Robert Ivei to sit comfortably at the break. However, Excelsior shrugged off their sluggish first half and went at their opponents in the second period and they eventually reaped their reward after 35 minutes when Kevon Reid converted from close-range. Nemaar Meredith then pulled Excelsior level when he broke through and fired under the Mona goaltender. They also had a couple chances to steal the win, but could not capitalise. Excelsior coach Carla Hewitt admitted they started slowly, but was proud of the way her team rallied to get the draw. She looks forward to having a number of key players, who were not registered at the start of the league, to come in and make a big difference for the remainder of their season. “We were slow in the first half, but we made a change midway the half and we got the goals … I have some players to come in (for JC game) who unfortunately were not register with ISSA. I expect a close game, but with the talent we have, I expect the win, so we expect to come out on top,” she added. JC lead the group with six points, followed by Excelsior and Papine on four and Mona and Kingston College at the bottom on one point each. The competition continues on Friday with three games.last_img read more

Read More →

Drugs and sports

first_imgA drug is any substance that may affect a person’s emotional state, body function, or behaviour. Most drugs are developed for medical purposes, but they can be dangerous when misused.The misuse of drugs in sports has been around as early as the 1904 Olympics in St Louis, USA, where a marathon runner of the USA was suspected of taking drugs. At the 1960 Rome Olympics, a Danish cyclist, who had been using drugs, died of heatstroke. Issues concerning drug abuse continued throughout the years.Whatever the reasons are for taking drugs, the risks are high. Governing bodies try to prevent the misuse of drugs through coach and performer education and testing. Many drugs that are legally available contain substances that are prohibited by sports governing bodies.SOCIAL DRUGSThe drugs that are available within social situations are known as social drugs. Some are legal and widely used; others are illegal and still used by a number of persons. Social drugs are usually taken to help persons relax or to give an enjoyable experience. The most commonly used social drugs and their effects on performance are as follows: alcohol (depressant); amphetamines (stimulant); caffeine (stimulant); cannabis (depressant); cocaine (stimulant); nicotine e.g. tobacco (stimulant).Stimulants increase the heart rate and speed up the nervous system, while depressants slow down how the body works.PERFORMANCE-ENHANCING DRUGSThese are drugs that athletes specifically take to gain an unfair advantage over other competitors. Performance-enhancing drugs take many forms. They are all banned in sports and are grouped into the doping class as follows:• Anabolic agents (nandrolone, testosterone, etc) – Hormones that help repair muscle and bones. Occurs naturally in the body but also made artificially. They increase size and strength of muscles.• Narcotic analgesic (codeine, heroin, methadone) – Helps athletes compete or train even if they are injured.• Diuretics (frusumid, profenecid) – Produce rapid weight loss by reducing fluids in the body.• Peptides, hormones, analogues – Natural or artificial hormones that increase strength and size of muscles, repair damaged body tissue, and increase red blood count.• Stimulants (amphetamines, cocaine, ephedrine) – Speed up nervous system, quickening reaction; mask fatigue; and reduce pain.Some drugs are restricted in some sports but are not completely banned. These include:• Beta blockers – Keep heart rate and blood pressure low. Reduce tremor in hands.• Corticosteroids – Reduce inflammation and pain. Allow performance.• Local anaesthetics – Reduce pain, mask injury to allow performance.BLOOD DOPINGBlood doping is not an actual drug. This involves the practice of injecting blood that has been earlier removed from the athlete and stored in a refrigerator. This makes the blood cells many more than normal, thereby carrying more oxygen to the muscles. Blood doping cannot be detected but carries a high health risk.ANTI-DOPINGThe International Olympic Committee does not allow doping for three main reasons:1. To ensure that competition in sports is as fair as possible.2. To protect the health of sports people.3. To protect the image of sports.The World Anti-Doping Agency WADA) was established in 1999 to combat drugs in sports through education, strong leadership, and scientific research. The world anti-doping code has been written and ensures a common approach towards a vision where all sports are drug free. Regional Anti-Doping Agencies (RADO) have been set up.TESTINGDrug testing discourages those who might cheat, identifies performers who do cheat, and protects those who do not. Testing can take place during training and after competitions. It is carried out randomly. If a performer is selected for drug testing, there is a set procedure that is followed:1. Competitors are chosen for testing.2. Competitors go to doping-control room.3. Competitors produce urine samples.4. Samples are split and put into separate sealed containers.5. The containers are sent to the lab.6. Sample A tested.7. If negative, sample B is destroyed; if positive, the governing body of the sport investigates.8. A governing-body hearing is arranged.Athletes must let their location be known throughout the year and comply with the test by providing a blood or urine sample.It is important that performers know what is banned and the consequences if drug taking is not resisted.last_img read more

Read More →