Columnist gives Red Smith lecture

first_imgOne tweet says it all: “Journalism today all about speed, buzz, page views, instanaiety, not substance, leads to uninformed citizens, end of democracy, and probably civilization.” Kathleen Parker, author of the above tweet, Washington Post syndicated columnist and winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary, delivered the 29th annual Red Smith Lecture in Journalism on Thursday, titled “Journalism in the Age of Twitteracy.” Despite her success, Parker said she did not originally plan on becoming a journalist. Born in Winter Haven, Fla., she said reading was protection from unpleasant household chores for her. She said she read quite a bit in her youth. Parker left Florida in her early 20s, ventured north and began writing at the Charleston Evening Post. “I fell in love with journalism the old-fashioned way,” Parker said with a humorous bent. “We met at a party, we had a few drinks and one thing led to another. It really was love at first sight. “We made no money – I was taking home 90 bucks a week – but we were happy because we were doing something important,” she said. “There is nothing like going home at the end of the day with something in your hand that shows what you did.” Although she is always proud of her work, Parker said she often becomes frustrated while writing. “I do procrastinate and I do love-hate writing, because it’s so hard,” she said. “Writing is extremely difficult. I have to sift through masses of information to determine what is meaningful, and then find the meaning in that.” Her early experiences in journalism differ greatly from that of young journalists in the current age, Parker said. “I’m afraid that the spirit that I grew up with seems to be dead. Technology may have liberated us from newsprint,” she said. Technology may enable individuals to accomplish tasks faster and more efficiently, Parker said, but such efficiency is often overrated. “Twitter is fast, furious, spontaneous and immediate. But haste is the enemy of accuracy,” she said. “We know a lot of stuff. But are we really smarter?” Parker said technology changes human behavior, even if it does not change essential human nature. “The consensus seems to be that we’re better off with more people, more non-journalists, more people who are non-media talking,” she said. Parker said she disagreed with the consensus. “All voices are not created equal,” she said. She added that writers today feel more entitled, without paying their “journalistic dues.” Parker referenced her tweet when she presented the real problem of today’s generation. “A 2008 study showed that 34 percent of young people age 18-24 get no news from any source on a typical day,” Parker said. “If no one is reading the news, how will we manage a democratic government that relies on an informed citizen?” Parker’s experience with journalism will soon become simply a generation of journalism history, she said. “We have to convince them [young people] of the importance of news to self-governance. I think this will be a real challenge in the age of Twitteracy,” Parker said.last_img read more

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U.S. Army South and Belize Defence Force Work Together to Provide Projects and Services to Communities in Belize

first_imgBy Sgt. 1st Class John Etheridge/U.S. Army South April 03, 2017 U.S. Army South, in partnership with the Belize Defence Force (BDF), and the Belizean ministries of Defence, Health, and Education are proud to announce “Beyond the Horizon 2017” (BTH), a collaborative training exercise involving numerous U.S., Belizean, and international participants. BTH will provide free medical and dental services, as well as build medical and educational facilities, valued at $10 million, to communities across Belize. The exercise will start on March 25th, and is scheduled to end the second week of June. BTH furthers the U.S. government’s continued commitment to the government and people of Belize in the field of humanitarian assistance. During the exercise, the BDF and many Belizean organizations will work side by side with U.S. military forces, learning from each other and serving the Belizean people. BTH will strengthen the partnership between the United States and Belize through collaboration on a variety of projects throughout Belize. The exercise will consist of five construction projects and three medical service events. The construction projects are as follows – Expansion of the emergency room at the Western Regional Hospital in Belmopan – Construction of a new medical waste incinerator housing at the Western Regional Hospital in Belmopan. – Construction of a new medical clinic building at the Ladyville Health Clinic. – Construction of a new medical clinic building at the Double Head Cabbage Clinic. – Construction of three new classrooms at St. Matthew’s Government School. Beginning on April 8th, members of the BDF and the Ministry of Health, as well as medical professionals from the United States and other partner nations, will provide free general medical and dental services to the Belizean people. The dates and locations of the medical and dental services are as follows: – April 8-13 and April 15-20: Ladyville Community Center/Hurricane Shelter, Ladyville, Belize District. – May 6-20: Macal River Park, San Ignacio, Cayo District. – May 20-June 3: D Company Barracks, Dangriga, Stann Creek District. BTH began in 2008 and continues the proud legacy of civic assistance programs in Central America. Past BTH exercises in Belize have included construction of schools in Double Head Cabbage and Dangriga, as well as free medical and dental services in Hattieville. For more information on the BTH exercise, please contact local government offices in locations hosting BTH projects and visit the BTH’s and the U.S. Embassy’s Facebook pages.last_img read more

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Peru Stands Out in Pacific Partnership Humanitarian Mission

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo May 29, 2019 Two elements of the Peruvian Armed Forces made their capabilities available to the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet for multinational exercise Pacific Partnership 2019. The annual humanitarian crisis response exercise was conducted between March 1 and June 1 in the Indo-Pacific region. Peruvian Navy Lieutenant Omar Vicente García, head of Risks and Disasters Rapid Intervention Company of the Engineering and Infantry Battalion, and Lieutenant John Gamarra Bravo, a physician specialized in urology, were the only military representatives from Latin America. More than 500 service members from Australia, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, Peru, the Philippines, South Korea, Thailand, The United Kingdom, and the United States joined efforts for the three-month mission. The objective of the exercise is to improve interoperability and disaster response capabilities in the Indo-Pacific region. The mission also seeks to provide humanitarian support to the countries visited — in this occasion, the Federated States of Micronesia, Malaysia, the Marshall Islands, the Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste, and Vietnam — and contribute to stability and security in the region. “During the stops, teams from various areas of expertise build on each other’s experience to shape capability, capacity, and understanding for disaster preparation and response,” U.S. Navy Captain Randy Van Rossum, Pacific Partnership 2019 mission commander, told Diálogo. “If we understand each other, then we can be more effective when disasters hit.” Providing support For the mission, the Pacific Fleet deployed the expeditionary transport vessels USNS Fall River (T-EPF 4) and USNS Brunswick (T-EPF 6) from Naval Base Guam, in the U.S. territory in the western Pacific. Upon arriving on the island, the Peruvian officers, who each boarded a ship, were trained in humanitarian assistance, attack prevention, and countering human trafficking. They also learned about operational rules and safety criteria. At each stop, the officers met with host nations’ counterparts and personnel from government security agencies and nongovernmental organizations. Mission members provided disaster response and health seminars, as well as disaster preparedness training. They also took part in various projects based on each country’s needs, such as renovating schools and installing drinking water and filter systems, among other activities. “[In Peru] I’ve taken part in civic actions, medical and dental health campaigns, and illness prevention [activities] in remote areas. Now we have the capability to resolve problems with the minimum required,” Lt. Gamarra told Diálogo while on board the USNS Brunswick. “Working with health professionals of the U.S. Navy is amazing, because of their response capability in case of problems such as tropical diseases.” Participants also conducted field exercises to review interoperability capabilities. For example, in Tacloban, in the Philippines, service members faced a simulated magnitude 8.5 earthquake, and conducted a medical evacuation exercise as part of a simulated mass casualty drill in Kuching, Malaysia. “This work is very helpful for Peru,” Lt. Vicente, on board the USNS Fall River, told Diálogo. “By seeing how the other countries carry out their work, I will be able to give the [Peruvian] Navy a report on how we could improve, because the country has similar problems.” Capt. Van Rossum stressed the importance of multinational missions, such as Pacific Partnership, to reinforce regional cooperation. The exercise also strengthened bonds of friendship between participating forces. “Each country has different experiences with natural disasters, which brings a variety of capabilities,” said Capt. Van Rossum. “It’s important for our partner nations, such as Peru, to be directly involved in the specific lines of effort during Pacific Partnership 2019. We are fortunate to have two Peruvian officers who are a part of two different lines of effort, medical and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.” Stronger together The December 2004 earthquake and tsunami that hit Indonesia and killed more than 200,000 people led to the creation of exercise Pacific Partnership in 2006. In its 14th edition, the exercise evolved from a mission to provide direct care to an operation focused on enhancing partnerships. The several participating nations, which, upon an invitation from the Pacific Fleet share their experiences and knowledge, contribute to mission success. “Having Latin American partner nations to learn the best practices and share experiences in different fields of disaster preparedness and response helps increase cooperation,” Capt. Van Rossum concluded. “We are stronger when we work together.”last_img read more

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Watch This Inspirational Video, And Together, Let’s Predict The Future

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York I don’t know if this is part of some bigger campaign, because I don’t really follow many campaigns that say, “Send us a touching video about why you want something, and we’ll do it.” So, this video may just be because someone (or a couple of someones) had a good idea to do what so many people set out to do but fail.Make a video go viral.Not only that, but if it actually succeeds, it will not only have gone viral, but it will have accomplished something pretty amazing, but someone who, by all accounts, seems like a pretty amazing guy.So, watch because it’s inspiring.Watch because it’s worth sharing.And watch, because I suspect this guy may very well get his wish. Which would be pretty amazing.And then we can say, together, “Hey, remember that thing on that site that that guy wrote that I agreed with? We were right!”(Well, I’ll have been right. You’ll just be a follower. But in this case, that’s cool too.)WATCH. SHARE.last_img read more

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Nassau Dems Hold Unsanctioned Hearing on Contracts

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Nassau County Legislature’s Democratic minority held an unsanctioned hearing on the county’s contracting scandal after the panel’s Republican leadership ignored calls to schedule a formal public hearing on the issue.Dozens of people packed a conference room at the Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building in Mineola last Friday to hear the speakers discuss proposed reforms after Republicans locked them out of the legislative chamber and criticized the event.“We must take action to restore the public trust and to reassure people that their hard-earned dollars are not being squandered and misused,” said Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams (D-Hempstead).Multiple investigations into the county’s contracting process are underway since New York State Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre), the former senate majority leader, was arrested in May and pleaded not guilty to federal corruption charges of allegedly influencing a Nassau contract in exchange for a job for his son.“I will not allow this process to devolve into a political circus and I will not allow unilateral hearings to be conducted in the legislative chamber,” Presiding Officer Norma Gonsalves (R-East Meadow) wrote in a letter to Abrahams.Among the proposals urged by speakers at the event were doing away with the automatic approval of contracts valued at less than $25,000, eliminating the rule that allows contracts to be automatically enacted if they’re not voted on within 45 days of filing, banning taxpayer-funded political mailings, modernizing the largely paper-based process so that it’s searchable online and establishing an independent inspector general.Gonsalves noted that this spring the legislature had created a lobbyist registry that increases transparency, but Abrahams countered that the bill didn’t go far enough.Acting Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas, a Democrat running to keep her job against Republican Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray, called the process a “recipe for corruption” as she put it in a preliminary report on her continuing investigation into county contracts.“The victimization is systemic,” Singas said. “People turn to the government for help and assistance. When we don’t demand excellence from our elected officials, it’s corrosive to public trust. Let’s stop talking and start taking action.”A panel that Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano appointed to study the issue also suggested creating an inspector general, among other recommendations.last_img read more

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Credit unions boost youths’ fiscal fitness during National Credit Union Youth Month

first_imgCredit unions across the country have turned into miniature financial health clubs in an effort to get young members focused on their fiscal fitness.It’s all part of National Credit Union Youth Month, sponsored by CUNA each April. The theme for the 2016 National Credit Union Youth Month is “Credit Union Strong,” which positions credit unions as the No. 1 place for financial fitness, says Jeremiah Tucker, CUNA’s youth month coordinator.“We want to position credit unions as financial fitness coaches for kids,” Tucker says. “We want to provide youth with opportunities, show them how we’re here to help them meet their goals, and make them stronger financially.”To achieve that goal, credit unions have hosted events throughout April that show youth how to strengthen money skills and grow their savings, while also teaching them how credit unions are different from banks. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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With 11 Million Cases in the U.S., the Coronavirus Has Gotten Personal for Most People

first_imgThose alarming numbers — the highest case numbers and death toll in the world — underscore a reality found in small towns, big cities and sprawling suburbs alike: The coronavirus has become personal. – Advertisement – Researchers estimate that nearly all Americans have someone in their social circle who has had the virus. About a third of the population knows someone — from a close relative to a neighbor to a co-worker to a friend of a friend — who has died from the virus, researchers say. But not everyone is hunkering down in fear or taking precautions as simple as wearing a mask. “As more and more people know someone who gets sick and dies, more and more Americans are likely to take this disease seriously,’’ said Nicholas A. Christakis, a Yale sociologist and the author of “Apollo’s Arrow,’’ a new book about the impact of the virus. “But the effect of knowing people who survived it may lead people to misread Covid as not being as bad as it is.” Ms. Kemp, for one, has become more vigilant since listening to her roommate cough herself to sleep at night. She wears a mask when she walks her dog, and notices when others do not. Wessie and John Dietz, of Sauk County, Wis., wear masks even in their car since their 20-year-old grandson, an electrician’s apprentice, appeared to have contracted the virus from a friend he took a ride with. “I hadn’t even thought about it before that,” Ms. Dietz said.And April Polk, of Memphis, has urged all young people to follow restrictions to curb the spread of the virus since her 24-year-old sister, Lameshia, died this summer. “I was one of the ones that didn’t take it seriously, and it took for me to lose my little sister to realize how real this virus is,” Ms. Polk said. “Every day we’re suffering, and we have to be reminded of what happened and how it happened to her.” The United States surpassed 11 million reported virus cases on Sunday, with one million of those tallied in just the last week. The daily average of new cases is up by 80 percent from two weeks ago. More than 69,000 people were in American hospitals with Covid-19 on Saturday; more than 1,100 deaths are being reported each day on average. – Advertisement – As Covid-19 cases surge in almost every part of the country, researchers say the United States is fast approaching what could be a significant tipping point — a pandemic so widespread that every American knows someone who has been infected. But, as reflected in the polarized response to the virus, the public remains deeply divided about how and whether to fight it, and it is unclear whether seeing friends and relatives sick or dead will change that. Many who have seen people close to them seriously affected say they are taking increased precautions. Others, though, are focusing on how most people recover and are shrugging off the virus — and calls for concerted efforts to combat it. The virus tore through Jennifer L. Stacy’s family over a nine-month stretch, with an older brother, a younger sister and a nephew among those infected. On Friday, Ms. Stacy’s immediate family went to get tested after possible exposure from another family member. His grandson’s family has all been infected, Mr. Rohr said, as have his granddaughters. The guitar and piano player in his rock ‘n’ roll band both got the virus recently, and one was hospitalized. But, he notes, most people recover. “Fear and hysteria have created more problems than the virus itself,” said Mr. Rohr, a city commissioner in Mandan, N.D., the state with the highest rate of known cases in the country. “Most people I know have had sniffles and loss of taste.”Ken Weigel, 57, also knows many people who have been infected with the coronavirus. The list includes himself, his wife and their son, and his 83-year-old mother, who is currently infected.But there is more to consider, he said, than a simple calculation about health risks, like the side-effects of shutting down the economy, stifling individual freedom and isolating people from one another. “There’s so many people dying from suicides and depression and alcoholism and drug overdose, and it’s just wrong,” said Mr. Weigel, who works as a hot shot driver for Halliburton at the oil fields in Minot, N.D. For some, the lessons learned have as much to do with faith as public health.center_img Gabriel Quintas accepts the death of his favorite uncle, Joel, from Covid-19 complications at the age of 39 as the will of God and says that he harbors no anger or resentment. Joel, who worked in a bakery in Champaign, Ill., was not the only one in his family to contract the coronavirus, but he was the only one to die from it in the United States. Gabriel’s own parents and two of his brothers tested positive and so did both of Joel’s young sons, though they all made full recoveries. Just a few weeks ago, Kem Kemp, a high school teacher in Houston, knew no one personally who had tested positive for the coronavirus. Then her roommate came down with a deep cough and was diagnosed with Covid-19. Her brother, a dentist in Amarillo, Texas, also tested positive. A neighbor fell sick with the virus. Two faculty members at the private school where she teaches were required to quarantine. And in the last few days, so were two of the students she advises. “Before, we were watching the numbers on the news,’’ said Ms. Kemp, 62. “Now it’s started creeping into my neighborhood, my school, my home — right where I’m existing.’’- Advertisement – “We don’t want to blame anybody,” Mr. Quintas, 20, said. “It is something tragic that happened and we want to move on.”Research has shown that the lessons people draw from their social networks can be more powerful than anything they read on the news or receive from a government or educational institution they may not trust. How Americans perceive the threat of the virus in the lives of their friends and acquaintances will likely influence their willingness to be vaccinated, researchers said. The perceived threat of the virus may also depend on how close someone is to a person who has died or suffered a long-term disability as a result of the virus. While about a third of Americans know someone who has died of Covid-19, only a small percentage can count a virus victim among their 20 closest contacts, according to a calculation by James Moody, director of a network analysis center at Duke University. “It’s the old joke about Facebook friends,’’ Dr. Moody said. “How many of them will help you move your couch? If you’re talking to a friend of a friend about someone who died, at that point it’s not impactful in the way that tends to shape people’s behavior.’’Mike Weinhaus, who was hospitalized with Covid-19 in St. Louis this spring at the same time as his wife, has actively sought to share their cautionary tale with friends, family and wider social network. His wife, Jane, went on a ventilator, then off, then back on again. Neither had pre-existing conditions. Two of his children and a daughter-in-law have also had Covid-19. But Mr. Weinhaus knows his personal experience can only go so far as a means of persuasion. “When I see people that aren’t practicing social distancing and refuse to wear masks, I do not go up to them and say, ‘You’re making a big mistake,’ because you aren’t going to win that battle,” Mr. Weinhaus said. Like many Americans gripped by Covid-19, Ms. Stacy, 57, a budget analyst, had learned to live with technology as a stand-in for visits to her mother in Charlottesville, Va. An hour away at her home in Locust Grove, Va., she created a bubble with her husband and close relatives, forging a routine of sanitizer, masks and social distancing.And when Virginia relaxed some restrictions over the summer, she worried that it would eventually lead to an increase in cases. Now, as Ms. Stacy awaits her own test results, the virus feels closer than ever — and the need to be cautious more urgent. “I used to mask up and go to the grocery store,” she said. “Now I am ordering online with curbside delivery,” She added: “I still did not anticipate Covid would come into my own house.”Reporting was contributed by Julie Bosman, Jack Healy, Melina Delkic, Dan Levin, Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio, Rick Rojas, Simon Romero, John Eligon and Mitch Smith. Nearly 2.2 million Americans have lost a close family member to Covid, research has shown, with troubling emotional and financial effects for children, widows and parents. Kristin Urquiza, 39, of San Francisco, said she continues to have nightmares about her father’s death from the disease in late June in Arizona. Rosie Davis, a skin laser technician in Carrollton, Texas, has been attending remote grieving classes since her mother died in May at a hospital: “I will never have closure because I was not able to be next her when she passed,’’ Ms. Davis said. Kerry Knudson, of Sioux Falls, S.D. has “been a wreck,’’ she said, after people in her circle died and her daughter, Jadyn, 13, contracted the virus. With the virus percolating fast through Jadyn’s middle school three months later, Jadyn is still battling waves of exhaustion and fever. But for Dennis Rohr 77, even learning that an acquaintance had died from Covid-19 a few days after sitting beside him at a dinner table has not changed his opinion that the disease is relatively benign. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Not playing anthem disrespected vets

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThe Oct. 7 Daily Gazette front page headline: “Anthem not played at school pep rally.” Well, isn’t that nice. Sure you have a right to express your feelings. But I also have a right to question how my school tax dollars are being used.I served two tours in Vietnam, so I know what the flag, anthem and our country means to me. So the next time you take a knee remember — don’t get any grass stains. I paid for that uniform you are wearing.Bryon J. MiglucciNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

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Stock market ignores 23% Asda NAV rise

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Zeaborn Ship Management Aims to Grow Fleet to 250 Ships, Gets New CEO

first_imgGermany’s Zeaborn Ship Management intends to grow its managed fleet to 250 vessels with the support of a newly appointed CEO.With effect from today, Rob Grool is taking over the leadership of Zeaborn Ship Management from Holger Strack, who has been acting as the company’s interim CEO since the beginning of the year.“With the appointment of Rob Grool, we are very excited to have found an internationally renowned executive for our company’s top management,” Jan-Hendrik Többe and Ove Meyer, the Zeaborn Group’s Managing Partners, commented.“Together with Rob, we want to work towards a strategic goal of expanding our managed fleet to more than 250 vessels,” they revealed.Last month, Zeaborn acquired 100 percent of the shares in Claus-Peter Offen Tankschiffreederei (CPO Tankers), the tanker management subsidiary of Offen Group.“With the acquisition of Claus-Peter Offen Tankschiffreederei (CPO Tankers), we have set the course for Zeaborn Ship Management as a full service provider in the ship management sector,” Többe and Meyer further said.Established in 2013, Zeaborn is an integrated shipping company providing services along the entire value-added chain. Zeaborn Shipping is the holding company for the global ship management activities of the group. Under the brand Zeaborn Ship Management, the company offers the full range of ship management activities.As of April 2019, Zeaborn Ship Management’s fleet comprised 34 bulk carriers, 85 containerships and 13 multipurpose vessels, according to data provided on the company’s website.last_img read more

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