Elections Canada opens returning office in Fort St. John

first_imgResidents of Fort St. John will finally have the opportunity to cast their ballot in advance without a visit to the post office. For the first time, Fort St. John will host its own Elections Canada returning office this year.The office will act as a subsidiary of the main returning office in Dawson Creek. Cheryl Ireland, Returning Officer for Prince George – Peace River, says the size and location of the city his finally merited an office in this election.The office, located on 98A Ave, will offer residents the chance to register to vote in person. Residents can also vote in advance at the returning office until October 7th.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Read More →

Update #3- Fire causes power outage in Charlie Lake area

first_img**Update – Power was restored to this area at about 6:30pm.  Hydro is now reporting that there is still a power outage in the Charlie Lake area.  They now say 297 customers in the area are without power and it could be restored by 8pm.  The outage runs from the 273 road in the West and South of Tamarack Road.  There is also another outage being reported west of the 275 road and is affecting 302 customers.  This outage is expected to be restored by 8:30pm.  The cause of both outages are still under investigation. Map:  This map shows the location of the two outages in Charlie Lake By Energeticcity.ca StaffAdvertisement **Update – Hydro now says the power will be out until at least 11:00pm tonight.  The power outage is now affecting over 1,400 customers in the Charlie Lake area.center_img – Advertisement -**Update – Power has been restored to the Charlie Lake area.  For more on this story, click here  A large power outage is affecting over 1,400 customers in the Charlie Lake area.The outage stretches from North of Highway 29 to South-East of the Alaska Highway and West of 86th street.  The power went out at around 5pm and is expected to be back on by 7:30pm.  At this time we are working getting details about the fire.We will post more information as it becomes available. Advertisementlast_img read more

Read More →

Chinese draft accord with N. Korea called good start

first_imgBEIJING – South Korea’s nuclear envoy said today that a Chinese draft agreement – with North Korea accepting in principle the initial steps for its disarmament – offered a good start for discussion. Envoys from six nations are trying to agree on steps to implement a September 2005 deal in which North Korea pledged to disarm in exchange for aid and security guarantees. The 2005 deal – the only one to emerge since negotiations began in 2003 – was a broad statement that did not outline any concrete steps for dismantling North Korea’s nuclear program. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read More →

Hiking club ready to scout outdoors

first_imgA new Community Hiking Club has been created to encourage local groups and families to get outdoors, visit wilderness areas and lead healthy lifestyles. The club is a partnership program of the city of Santa Clarita, the Santa Clarita Chamber of Commerce, Los Angeles County and other local organizations including the Jaycees, the YMCA, the Boys & Girls Club and the Boy Scouts. Local volunteers will lead hikes with varying degrees of difficulty at Placerita Canyon Nature Center, Whitney Canyon, Vasquez Rocks and other natural areas. Michael Grenetz, 27, of California Wild Heritage’s Newhall office, is one of the organizers of the club. “We’re trying to make it as accommodating as possible. Some people want an aerobic workout and some people want to hike with their kids. We’ve planned something for everyone,” Grenetz said. The mission of the club is to promote the quality of life in Santa Clarita, to provide opportunities for families and groups to get outside, to educate young people about the environment and to promote healthy lifestyles. “When I grew up, we would go outside and play in the outdoors. But today, kids have their Game Boys,” Grenetz said. “We want to encourage people to get in shape, and going outside and going on a hike is one of the most inspiring ways to do it.” About 60 people have already signed up to participate, Grenetz said. Expert guides will educate the hikers on different topics during each hike. “People seem really excited. You can work out indoors, and that can be boring, or you can go outdoors and it’s much more fun,” he said. According to Grenetz, hikers don’t need to travel to Yosemite to have a great outdoor experience. There are great places to go hiking right here in the Santa Clarita Valley. “They’ll be hiking in places they’ve heard of, but maybe never explored closely,” Grenetz said. “People should be prepared to be surprised and have a great time.” For information about the Community Hiking Club, or to volunteer to be a hike leader, call Frank Hoffman at Placerita Canyon Nature Center at (661) 259-7721. sharon.cotal@dailynews.com (661) 257-5256 Community Hiking Club Spring Schedule Most hiking programs begin at Placerita Canyon Nature Center. There will be free (limited) car-pool space and caravans with other hikers to the trailhead. Rain may cancel. Call the Nature Center at (661) 259-7721 for cancellations. Unless specified, meet at the Nature Center at 9:30 a.m. Hikes scheduled for 8 a.m. will have a lecture at the Nature Center before the 9:30 a.m. hike departs. Wednesday: Whitney Canyon, easy, 3 miles round trip. April 14*: Pleasant View Ridge, South Fork to Devil’s Punchbowl, moderate, 6.7-mile one-way hike. April 21: MRCA leads a Placerita Canyon Fire Ecology Hike, easy to moderate, 4-mile hike with lecture, 8 a.m. April 28: Whitney Canyon and Whitney Canyon to Olive View, two hikes, one easy 3-mile and one strenuous 8-mile fitness hike. May 5*: Magic Mountain, Old Miner Trail, moderate, 2 miles. May 12: Bear Divide Trail, easy, 2 miles, shaded. May 18: Famous Pacific Crest Trail Slide Show, 7 p.m. at Nature Center. May 19: Pacific Crest Trail Association leads a Pacific Crest Trail Hike, moderate, 4 miles, meet at Vasquez Rocks Natural Area at 8 a.m. May 26*: Castaic Mountains, Liebre Mountain, moderate, 6 miles. June 2*: Piru Creek, Water Hike/Swim, moderate, 6 miles, stream wading and swimming potential. June 9*: Castaic Mountains, Sawmill Mountains Pacific Crest Trail Hike, moderate, 4.5 miles. June 16: Birding Hike, easy to moderate, 5 miles to waterfall and owl habitat, with Birds of Prey lecture, 8 a.m. *Denotes U.S. Forest Service Adventure Pass is required160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read More →

County woos feds for $100 million for sheriff’s needs

first_imgWASHINGTON — Los Angeles County officials wrapped up a two-day lobbying trip Thursday, saying they made strides in a request for $100 million to revamp the Sheriff’s Department’s aging communications system. “It’s amazing that so many years after 9-11 we still don’t have interoperability,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Pasadena, who met with county supervisors and Fire Chief Michael Freeman. Schiff, who is on the House Appropriations Committee that oversees funding for programs that ensure communities can talk to one another during times of crisis, called the county’s request “a big ask.” But he said he is confident Los Angeles can obtain the funding through a $1 billion federal grant Congress is creating to address the problem. Sheriff Lee Baca noted that his department’s communications system — which will encompass 88 cities as well as the county and be built over four years — will cost more than $400 million. “It’s important to ask for what you need,” Baca said. “We are prepared to make a strong case that we are more advanced in mutual-aid sharing than any place in the United States.” Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael Antonovich also called the trip productive and said he spent much of the past two days pitching Republican lawmakers on the importance of blocking legislation that would allow illegal immigrants to become citizens. He also was involved in a White House meeting with Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff in which he pitched a proposal to use volunteer reserve officers to help patrol the U.S.-Mexico border. Antonovich likened the proposal to Los Angeles County’s reserve officer program. Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Santa Clarita, endorsed the proposal, calling it a “great idea.” In addition to meetings with the Los Angeles congressional delegation, supervisors also met with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco; Ways and Means Chairman Charles Rangel; and White House Intergovernmental Affairs Director Maggie Grant. The supervisors voiced objections to a proposed federal cap on public hospital funding, saying it could cost Los Angeles County $200 million a year. Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky said that with Democrats in charge of the House and Senate, he and others ended the trip feeling optimistic. “At least now when we talk to the Los Angeles delegation they have some clout,” he said.— Lisa Friedman, (202) 662-8731lisa.friedman@langnews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read More →

More residents unable to manage

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsKathy Hefferon, 42, a single mom with three kids who receives no child support and has been on her own for five years, provides for her family on a $25,000-a-year job as a school aide. The Canyon Country resident has worked at Hart High School in Newhall for 20 years, but recently applied for a transfer because the increase in gas prices is choking her budget. “I love it at Hart, it’s going to be the hardest thing to do to leave Hart,” she said. “(But) financially, it will cut my gas bill in half.” The part-time job aiding children with emotional disabilities lands her home in time to greet her sons, 7 and 14, and daughter, 15, after school. She doesn’t know where her ex-husband is. “There was a point when I had to make a decision that instead of them coming home to an empty house it was more important to me to be home … than to make a little more money and for them be home alone till 5 or 6 in the evening,” she said. Some friends – carry-overs from the married years – applaud the decision. Others wince. SANTA CLARITA – Bristol Farms, a high-end market is due next spring on the heels of the Mercedes-Benz of Valencia dealership, and the average home costs more than $600,000. But advocates for the working poor say Santa Clarita has a growing hidden population that’s barely making it in a high-priced town with few well-paying jobs. “We have an invisible level of the community who work, who are generally single-parent heads of households or very-low wage earners who have had a stable life, not needing any kind of emergency services,” said Lupe Lopez, director of the local office of the Los Angeles County Department of Community and Senior Services. They were barely hanging on, then gasoline zoomed past the $3-a-gallon mark. “All of a sudden they find themselves not able to manage … and the (spike in) the cost-of-living that appears to be triggered by an increase in gasoline prices is really starting to hurt these families,” Lopez said. The family does not qualify for federal public assistance, but frugal budgeting helps them get by with a little help from local agencies. Hefferon’s kids participate in reduced-price school lunch programs, she stocks up on staples and dairy foods at a food pantry, and enrolled in a program that discounts electricity, gas, phone and trash bills. The mortgage on her three-bedroom condo – bought a decade ago when she was married – is $1,000-a-month. “I could not afford to buy my home today,” she said. “I probably could not afford to rent a three-bedroom apartment.” The median price of a single-family home in Santa Clarita in April was $643,000, and rent is upward of $900 for a one-bedroom apartment. Buoyed by some good fortune, the Hefferon family barely misses falling under the federal poverty line, which is about $20,000 for a family of four. “What we found in a recent study is because we typically measure poverty by federal guidelines we miss many families who are struggling to make ends meet, particularly in high-rent places,” said Deborah Reed, program director and population research fellow for the Public Policy Institute of California, a private nonprofit nonpartisan group. “The community may look at the poverty rate and say that is very low, there’s not much poverty here, but there is a larger share of families who have very little income after paying the rent.” This remainder for this family is about $13,000 a year. Hefferon volunteers at the Hunger Defense Fund’s food pantry Wednesday night and Saturday morning, preferring to give something for the food she gets in return. The nonprofit outlet in Canyon Country lets clients fill the food boxes; one box serves one or two people, two boxes serve three to four and three boxes are available for five or more. Thirteen hundred low-income families have registered for the service, which distributes about 2,000 pounds of food a week and does not follow the stringent federal guidelines. “We are able to help some families that don’t qualify elsewhere,” said Wendi Lancy, an administrative assistant for the group, which is funded by donations. Clothes are sold for a nominal fee. “The premise of the organization is to offer a hand up, not a handout. We try to provide a service and help them; we’re just asking them to give a little back.” The Santa Clarita Valley Food Pantry distributes 1,000 pounds of food a day to people at or below 150 percent of the poverty level. For a family of four, that amounts to an annual household income of $28,275, for a family of six, $37,815. Reed, who authored a recently released study of poverty in California, commends agencies like these that rely on income criteria above the federal poverty line to determine eligibility. Food stamps were issued to 2,400 people in Santa Clarita in March, according to the county Department of Public Social Services. Some recipients leverage their earnings, living with friends or family members who cover the rent and other expenses. Hefferon said her family helps out, paying for school clothes, shoes, backpacks and sports programs, but eschews covering entertainment or other luxuries. Hefferon said her one indulgence is cable TV, a link from the past she was unwilling to sever for her children’s sake. Her children save money for extras by baby-sitting and doing yard work. She hopes financial aid will help steer them through college. Lopez says some are pawning possessions to pay for essentials, and a new stream of needy has arrived. “I’m seeing people who didn’t come before now coming and some people don’t come because they can’t,” she said. Many low-income families live on the edge of self-sufficiency, getting by without extra help, Reed said, but one small blip on the financial radar can tip the scale. “It could be gas prices, rent, it could be losing a job, a child getting sick and they need a prescription, a parent who gets sick who can’t work they go on unpaid leave,” she said. “Middle-income families have more of a cushion, they can take things out of their budget that are not so necessary, they can eat home instead of going out, they can not go on vacation this year.” Shortly after her husband walked out, Hefferon shuddered as she spooled on the last roll of toilet paper, wondering where the next roll would come from. Not long after, a paper bag stocked with groceries mysteriously appeared at the front door, and next to it, a 24-pack of toilet paper. The delivery was a spiritual balm. “I believe we have to do what we can to take care of ourselves, and as long as we’re doing everything we can do, God provides the rest,” she said. judy.orourke@dailynews.com (661) 257-5255160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read More →

Leaked England team shows World Cup hero dropped and Southgate trying new formation

first_img Stones and Maguire are at the back together 3 Gerrard launches furious touchline outburst as horror tackle on Barisic sparks chaos The UEFA Nations League clash in front of an empty Stadion HNK Rijeka may not hold as much importance or gravitas as the clash in Moscow in the summer, but Southgate will be keen to make amends for the 2-1 extra time defeat.According to The Telegraph, England will abandon the back three which got them to the last four in Russia and instead revert to a 4-3-3 formation.Eric Dier, Ross Barkley and Marcus Rashford are all reportedly going to start for England, with Kieran Trippier dropping out of the side in favour of Kyle Walker.The Manchester City man’s shift to his preferred role of right-back in Rijeka means Harry Maguire and John Stones will partner one another at the back once again. LATEST 3 3 At the World Cup Finals, the England boss was forced to choose between one of Rashford or Raheem Sterling, but the formation change allows him to play both alongside captain Harry Kane.Ross Barkley’s fantastic early season form means he starts in midfield with Dier tasked with keeping Modric and Ivan Rakitic quiet alongside Jordan Henderson.Jesse Lingard and Dele Alli featured heavily for the Three Lions in Russia, but are forced to miss out through injury. Leicester City star Ben Chilwell is expected to make his first international start after winning his first cap last time out against Switzerland. latest The average first-team salaries at every Premier League club in 2019 tense Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Southgate will be looking to rally the troops after losing to Croatia three months ago Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT revealed Check out the ‘leaked’ line up below! Most Popular Football Stories gameday cracker Gareth Southgate is ready to be bold and gamble by making drastic changes ahead of England’s UEFA Nations League clash with Croatia.Three months after being beaten by Luka Modric and Co in the World Cup semi-finals in Russia, Southgate will again send his Three Lions into battle. England to ditch 3-5-2 for this 4-3-3 formation scrap Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea’s 6-0 defeat at Man City Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions BEST OF last_img read more

Read More →

QPR’s Warren Farm plan ‘back on’ and Barton clarifies Arsenal comments

first_imgTony Fernandes has tweeted that QPR’s plan for a new training ground at Warren Farm is “back on” following a meeting with the leader of Ealing Council.Delays to the project and the expected cost mean Rangers have been looking into extending their current training base at Harlington instead.But club chairman Fernandes declared: “Super meeting with council leader Julian bell of Ealing. Super leader .so passionate. Warren Farm back on. Super exciting . great leader.”Super meeting with council leader Julian bell of Ealing. Super leader .so passionate. Warren Farm back on. Super exciting . great leader.— Tony Fernandes (@tonyfernandes) October 4, 2014Earlier this week Fernandes also tweeted about Rangers’ proposals for Old Oak.The club’s owners want to win the right to regenerate the area between Scrubs Lane and Willesden Junction, which would become known as New Queens Park and include a stadium for Rangers.“Just passing old oak common on the Heathrow express having returned form dubai. what an amazing project we could do for the community,” chairman Fernandes wrote.“Everyone can win. Its takes courage ,determination, putting people first and sharing the spoils for a better west london. Full stop.”Meanwhile, Rangers midfielder Joey Barton has been in the news for criticising Arsenal on Twitter.Barton has since tweeted: “What I said about Arsenal taken out of context. I believe the current side lack spine and character when compared to the Invincibles team.“The current side are a very good side but their record against other top clubs in league games recently is very poor.“Now whether thats tactics, mental strength, discipline, I’m not sure. All I do know is results say their coming up short.”See also:Legal victory for QPR in Warren Farm battleFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Read More →

Science Fails Its Ideals

first_imgFraud, lack of integrity and non-reproducible results continue to plague Big Science. Fair debate can help.Scientists strut about, and science teachers and reporters exalt them, because of their alleged superior methods of knowledge acquisition. Students are told that scientific findings are peer reviewed, reproducible, and testable. The reality is different. It’s like finding out your priest is a pervert.High-profile journals put to reproducibility test (Nature). Did you know two out of five published research results are not reproducible? The “reproducibility crisis” that embarrassed Big Science in recent years continues unabated (4 April 2017). We’re talking about the big-name players here:A reproducibility effort has put high-profile journals under the spotlight by trying to replicate a slew of social-science results. In the work, published on 27 August in Nature Human Behaviour, researchers attempted to reproduce 21 social-science results reported in Science and Nature between 2010 and 2015 and were able to reproduce 62% of the findings. That’s about twice the rate achieved by an earlier effort that examined the psychology literature more generally, but the latest result still raises questions about two out of every five papers studied.Let’s ask another question: could this latest test itself be reproduced? Who’s watching the watchers?No more excuses for non-reproducible methods (Nature). In his “World View” column, Lenny Teytelman shares some of the common rationalizations offered for non-reproducibility of research results. But he thinks there are fewer excuses for it now, thanks to the internet. Is a new golden age of trust coming?Now should be springtime for methods sharing. Mobile-friendly, web-based technologies are maturing just as the need to improve reproducibility has gained widespread attention. A new era of more-efficient, more-confident science is ours to lose.What his essay implies is that science has been unacceptably efficient before now, leading to unacceptable levels of public trust and confidence. This may be a jarring realization to people raised on the perception of science as the paragon of trustworthy knowledge.Open up peer review (Nature). The editors of Nature are feeling the heat of challenges to the traditional style of anonymous peer review. In the same issue of Nature, Jessica K. Polka and 4 other scientists, writing”Publish peer reviews,” call “on journals to sign a pledge to make reviewers’ anonymous comments part of the official scientific record.” Also in the same issue of Nature, Jonathan Tennant and two others argue that preprints (postings of scientific papers before peer review) help journalism, not hinder it.In suggesting that preprints could distort the public’s understanding of science, Tom Sheldon perpetuates the fallacy that peer review is a guarantee of validity (Nature 559, 445; 2018). There are countless examples to the contrary (see, for instance, A. Margalida and M. À. Colomer PeerJ 4, e1670; 2016)….Plenty of peer-reviewed research papers contain errors. Preprints provide a chance to spot these and have them removed before publication.The editors respond that “A transparent process to publish referees’ reports could benefit science, but not all researchers want their assessments made available.” So who is right? Nobody. Each solution has problems. Peer review is not a command etched on stone tablets, but an attempt to compensate for human fallibility and laziness. If men were angels, Jefferson said, they would not need government, nor would they need peer review (open or otherwise). This may be another jarring realization to people raised on the perception that peer review confers some kind of imprimatur on truth.How Unpaywall is transforming open science (Nature). Frustrated by the inability to access science papers behind the paywalls of journals, some individual scientists rigged a search algorith, called Unpaywall, that can find free copies online. Molly Else reports that the trend is growing to include Unpaywall in other science databases. This article illustrates how the lack of accessibility to published science hinders one of the ideals of science, which is free and open exchange.Corel Pro PhotosThe sugar wars: Rhetoric or reason? (Medical Express). This article illustrates that some of the things we “think” we know best may rely on shaky evidential ground. Sugar is bad, right? Scientists keep telling us to cut down on carbohydrates, because they cause diabetes and obesity. Along comes a maverick like Edward Archer, PhD, to challenge this assumption.In his article, Edward Archer, Ph.D., of EvolvingFX, Jupiter, FL, USA, challenged the latest dietary recommendations and presented evidence from multiple domains to show that “diet” is a necessary but trivial factor in metabolic health. “Anti-sugar rhetoric is simply diet-centric disease-mongering engendered by physiologic illiteracy,” he wrote. “My position is that dietary sugars are not responsible for obesity or metabolic diseases and that the consumption of simple sugars and sugar-polymers (e.g., starches) up to 75 percent of total daily caloric intake is innocuous in healthy individuals.“Six bullet items of factoids make his case. But before piling on the sugar in your diet, though, notice that his critics don’t take this challenge lying down. In Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, Archer’s claims that started “The Sugar Wars” were met with letters to the editor defending the traditional anti-sugar consensus. Archer remains unflappable. He responds with cogent attacks on the consensus:It is time for the medical and scientific communities to return to their roots, eschew magical and miraculous thinking, and demonstrate a modicum of skepticism by refuting the illiterate nonsense and puritanical proscriptions engendered by diet-centrism.Can a scientific consensus really be that wrong? We’re not taking sides in the Sugar Wars, because it is off-topic for CEH. It should be noted, however, that a long-trusted government study called the Food Pyramid was recently undermined by complaints that it was based on shoddy science. Classrooms across America posted diagrams of the Food Pyramid as if it represented the best advice from empirical science. Jonathan Wells gives another example. He quips in his book Zombie Science that the consensus was on an anti-egg binge years ago, only to reverse itself after making millions of people afraid to eat eggs, which it now says are healthy. How many egg farmers suffered from that detour?In a related article, Medical Xpress says, “Low-carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided.” Weren’t we all told for years that carbohydrates are bad? No look what the European Society for Cardiology says in their ESC Congress 2018:“We found that people who consumed a low carbohydrate diet were at greater risk of premature death. Risks were also increased for individual causes of death including coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. These diets should be avoided.“Another claim reported by Medical Xpress from the ESC Congress claims, “Components of heart healthy diet may differ from what was previously thought.” Thought by whom? Thought by the very food scientists who told us to significantly reduce carbohydrates in our diet.Professor Salim Yusuf, senior author and director of the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, said: “Thinking on what constitutes a high quality diet for a global population needs to be reconsidered. For example, our results show that dairy products and meat are beneficial for heart health and longevity. This differs from current dietary advice.”Recommendations for a high quality diet to avoid cardiovascular disease are largely based on studies conducted decades ago in high income countries. There is little information on what people eat today across the world.And yet coming up with a simple plate of food that would be called “healthy” for everyone from Inuits to Italians seems a daunting challenge. The point is that if scientists cannot come up with reliable guidelines for a subject as simple as what we should eat (a subject amenable to reproducible, testable results), how can they pretend to tell us about non-reproducible events from millions of years ago?One of Archer’s critics “feels it is important to have the scientists discuss opposing viewpoints in the journal.”Debate is supposed to be good for science. There is one topic that a scientist dare not oppose for fear of losing job, tenure, and respect: Darwinian evolution. The Pro-Darwin totalitarian dictators of Big Science are so entrenched, just using the phrase “intelligent design” in a submitted paper will guarantee rejection unless it mocks the phrase. Same for “irreducible complexity” or anything else that “smells” like it came from a Darwin doubter, no matter how good the science behind it. Don’t even think about “creation” or “young earth” getting a fair trial in the court of Big Science peer review.For instance, look how Science Daily gets away with claiming “Study confirms truth behind ‘Darwin’s moth’” as it regurgitates the old peppered moth myth. The article brashly asserts, “Scientists have revisited — and confirmed — one of the most famous textbook examples of evolution in action.” Jonathan Wells, PhD, who has studied the peppered moth story for at least 20 years, could shred this claim to pieces if he were allowed into the debate, but as an ID proponent, he remains hidden behind the sound-proof one-way glass erected by Big Science.The DODO’s don’t want anyone threatening their DOPE-pushing business. The reproducibility crisis shows them to be as naked as their Emperor Charlie.(Visited 439 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More →

Cartoon: Share Alike

first_img9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Related Posts Tags:#Cartoons#web rob cottingham More Noise to Signal. Past generations would be utterly baffled by some of the challenges parents and kids face today.True, we don’t have to write notes to school like “Dear teacher, Monique won’t be attending classes today because our entire village was wiped out by the Black Plague,” or arrange birthday parties at the mastadon petting zoo without the benefit of Evite or Facebook Events.But technological advances bring their own unique issues to contend with. Our parents’ and grandparents’ generations never had to wonder whether to tweet that cute thing their kid just said, or whether to ask permission first. They never had to worry about their kids’ privacy when half their peers are sharing smartphone photos on Facebook and videos on YouTube. They never had to vet hula hoops and Monopoly games for adult content, security issues or in-app purchases.In short, sure: maybe they walked to school uphill both ways through three feet of snow nine days a week. But they didn’t have a peer group expecting them to check in on Foursquare when they got there. 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

Read More →