New Suzy Lamplugh documentary to offer fresh evidence on her whereabouts

first_imgA new two-part documentary that recounts the infamous disappearance of estate agent Suzy Lamplugh is to be broadcast next week including both new interviews with her surviving family and claims made by a new witness.Episode 1 is due to be broadcast on Sky on 14th March and, its producers promise, will use compelling new evidence to ‘unravel Suzy’s case and her disappearance’.Fulham, London-based sales negotiator Lamplugh was just 25 when she disappeared on July 28th 1986 after leaving her Sturgis Estate Agents branch to meet a ‘Mr Kipper’ to view a property on Shorrods Road.She was last seen getting into her car with a man before disappearing into thin air. Lamplugh was declared ‘presumed dead’ in 1993. She would have turned 60 this year.Multiple official and unofficial police, newspaper and TV investigations have failed to either definitely prove who killed Lamplugh or discover the location of her remains, although serial sex offender John Cannan has been named as the most likely candidate.The recent TV investigation came just three months ago; the December, 2020 Channel 5 documentary, ‘The Vanishing of Suzy Lamplugh’ (pictured above).Jim LamplughBut the new and longer Sky documentary revisits the story of her disappearance and the ensuing police investigations in gripping detail, as well as featuring an interview with her brother, Jim.He claims to have spoken to a woman who has credible evidence that Cannan was seen struggling with suitcase at 5am in the morning at the side of the Grand Union canal in Brentford a few days after Lamplugh disappeared.The Suzy Lamplugh Mystery will begin at 9pm, 14th March on Sky Crime.Pic credit: Channel 5John Cannan Channel 5 Sky Suzy Lamplugh March 7, 2021Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » New Suzy Lamplugh documentary to offer fresh evidence on her whereabouts previous nextAgencies & PeopleNew Suzy Lamplugh documentary to offer fresh evidence on her whereaboutsSky Crime says its two-part contribution to the growing oeuvre of TV shows about her disappearance offers new insights and family interviews.Nigel Lewis7th March 202106,187 Viewslast_img read more

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Concerns raised about religious inclusivity at Somerville

first_imgIn a discussion about the new rules on Facebook, one JCR member said, “The forms of kosher and halal without pre-stunning were considered deeply unethical during the meeting so were removed from the motion. Religious thoughts were put aside for the sakes of animal welfare, quite rightly.“This was later re-amended to permit halal and kosher only if animals had been pre-stunned, even though many are uncomfortable with this as this sort of meat fails to qualify as kosher/halal to many people (especially orthodox Jews).“The Jewish and Muslim communities were poorly represented in the meeting as there was simply no one to represent them. In the mean time, I hope we continue to prioritize animal welfare over other abhorrent practices, without anyone feeling the need to get offended.“We continue to offer vegetarian meals 7 days a week for anyone unhappy with the fact that their meat did not suffer the cold sting of a blade to the throat.”The President of JScoc, Nicole Jacobus, told Cherwell: “The very fact that this amendment was passed in a JCR meeting without a Jewish student being able to challenge it highlights the lack of diversity and awareness of other cultures amongst students in Oxford.“The vote to ban kosher food only makes the diversity issue worse, as it shows that Jewish students are not only poorly provided for, but that they cannot actively practise as Jews at Somerville.“This reflects badly on the whole of the Oxford student community. Oxford JSoc is always there to ensure Jewish students have the freedom to practise their religion as they choose to.“We appreciate that the Somerville JCR President has now liaised with both Jewish students at the college and the staff to clearly work towards making kosher food available to students.“Nevertheless, this situation has demonstrated the severe lack of cultural awareness that Oxford is facing.”Somerville JCR President Emmanuel Amissah-Eshu has said, “We are pleased that we have been able to secure the support of the JCR in asking College to provide more inclusive food options in the form of gluten free, lactose free and pre-stunned halal meat on our menus.“It has resulted in a productive meeting with College where they said they would look into providing the above as well as a proposal for kosher food to be available upon request for those that want it. This will be followed up on to make sure it happens.“The debate following the motion to ask College to provide more gluten-free, lactose- free, halal and kosher food was a difficult and controversial conversation at times but the JCR is a place for such discourse but the motion amendment and the resulting vote was solely based on the debate of stunned vs pre-stunned meat provision in Hall and not the religious implications.” Somerville JCR has faced controversy this week over a motion seeking to introduce halal and kosher food to hall, including accusations that the JCR is not sufficiently concerned about the welfare of its Jewish students.The original motion proposed that “Somerville have decided to take octopus off the menu for the annual Fresher’s Dinner so this appears to be is a good time to review the menu in general, we think that they could do more in terms of hall provision to ensure that different groups of people can eat in hall more.”The proposed changes faced opposition from some JCR members, who raised concerns that halal and kosher meat were produced in “inhumane” ways.An amendment was then proposed “to remove the halal and kosher aspects of this motion due to the animal welfare concerns about how animals are killed in order for them to be halal and kosher”, which passed with 22 votes in favour, 8 against, and 7 abstentions.Supporters of the initial motion argued that between 80% and 90% of animals used to produce Halal and Kosher meat are stunned beforehand (the correct figure is 84% according to the RSPCA), but concerns were raised that religious law prevents Kosher meat from being pre-stunned.In the end, the motion passed with 26 JCR members voting “in favour of re-adding the halal and kosher aspects of the original motion on the condition that it is pre-stunned”.However, this was met with a backlash on the JCR’s Facebook page, with one student even questioning whether “the JCR cares more about animals than its Jewish members”, whilst others noted that the acceptability of stunning is widely debated in Islam and particularly Judaism.Another student claimed that the JCR’s Head of Environment and Ethics was “doing his best to ensure that we source ethical produce: “He is doing so in good faith and because he believes passionately in animal welfare.”last_img read more

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Mecaplastic seals deal

first_imgwww.mecaplastic.com Mecaplastic offers a range of sandwich filling and sealing machines, enabling businesses to select the right capacity for their requirements.Size adjustments can also be made on Mecaplastic cardboard sandwich-pack filling machines simply and quickly. The Mecapack 470 and 700 models enable automatic simultaneous adjustment in just 30 seconds.The 470 model is a mid-range machine with a capacity of up to 80 packs per minute, whereas the 700 model has a capacity of up to 180 packs per minute. The machine also uses ’wide edge’ technology, so there are no unsightly white edges on the finished product.last_img read more

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Roberts Bakery to sponsor county show

first_imgRoberts Bakery is to support the Royal Cheshire County Show for an 11th consecutive year.The bakery has renewed its principal partnership with the show, due to be held this year on 21-22 June, and will sponsor the Roberts Bakery Food Halls.The halls will showcase more than 90 food producers and purveyors, including Roberts Bakery itself and its biscuit and sweet clusters sub-brand, The Little Treats Co. Inside, there will also be a live theatre programme of presentations by local chefs and companies using local produce.Mike Roberts, deputy chairman at Roberts Bakery, said: “We’re a local, family-run business with an almost 130-year heritage across the north west and the Midlands, and we’re committed to many community engagements, as well as environmental and educational programmes.“Cheshire is very much our heartland, and we are delighted to take such a prominent role, especially one associated with quality food, at such a popular county event.”last_img read more

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ECAC Hockey taps Danny Biega

first_imgSophomore defenseman Danny Biega of the Harvard men’s hockey team has been named to the ECAC Hockey all-league second team, the league announced on March 16.Biega led ECAC Hockey defensemen in league points (21), goals (nine), game-winning goals (three), and short-handed goals (one). He ranked second in assists (12), power-play goals (five), and power-play points (11). Only six forwards registered more league points; eight logged more goals and two had more game-winners.For the full story.last_img read more

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A quarter-century, and still going strong

first_img Just smile Jaime Moreno, animal quarters supervisor at Harvard’s Bio Labs, is all smiles. Goodie bags A display of gifts that employees got to choose from to commemorate their service. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Perspective This chart shows the local rents in 1986, the year this crop of employees was hired. Family affair Wendy Chandler (left), a staff assistant for Harvard Public Affairs & Communications, celebrates with her daughter, Crystal. Historical figures 89-cent gas. Those were the days … After 25 years on the job as a mailroom staff assistant, Roger Joujoute has become a guardian angel of the Harvard Kennedy School — and he has just the story to prove it.Back in the ’90s, when he worked on the second floor of the Littauer Building, Joujoute developed a system for signaling to busy mail carriers standing on the ground level. If the mailroom needed a package to be picked up, Joujoute would hold up a large sign reading “Yes.” If not, he’d hold up “No.”One day, however, a student came in and asked if he could have Joujoute’s “Yes” sign. At the start of the school year, the young man explained, he had been standing in the Littauer atrium, asking God for a sign that he’d made the right choice in coming to Harvard.“Sure enough, he was chatting with people, and he looked up,” Joujoute recalled. “That day, fortunately for him, we had packages.”Joujoute isn’t the only employee keeping watch over Harvard. In fact, he was just one of 142 faculty and staff honored at the 57th annual 25-Year Recognition Ceremony on Dec. 1 for their long-running commitment to the University. With their combined 3,550 years of service, the newest members of the quarter-century club are the keepers of Harvard’s living legacy.“You are the institutional memory; you are the institutional identity,” President Drew Faust told the crowd of more than 200 honorees, family members, and co-workers gathered at the Harvard Faculty Club. “It really behooves us to sit here and recognize what’s important about continuity and about commitment and about deep engagement with an institution.”The honorees dined on a full buffet and open bar, chatted with Faust, and mulled their options for their 25-year gift (a crystal bowl garnered covetous looks, but the traditional engraved rocking chair seemed to be the most popular choice). Some signed up to share their tales with a representative from Harvard Stories, the University’s new video history project.“Today, for once, it’s all about you,” Mary Ann O’Brien, director of planning and program management for Harvard Human Resources, told the crowd.The event drew a bit of nostalgia for simpler times. In the years since 1986, complete vacation has become a foreign concept, thanks to constant connectedness wrought by technology, Faust noted.“Remember those little pink pads that said ‘While you were out’? [Now] you’re never out,” she said to knowing laughter.But if the times have changed, Harvard has evolved too, she said. It was only in 1989 that the first woman took a seat on the Harvard Corporation. When the honorees began working at Harvard during its 350th year, Prince Charles was the guest of honor at the anniversary celebration.By contrast, this fall’s 375th celebration was “a raucous, wet, multidimensional celebration … that I think Prince Charles would have found quite alarming,” Faust said wryly.Harvard has greater gender, ethnic, and international diversity than ever, Faust said, an observation borne out by the mix of faces in the crowd.“All these changes that you have witnessed; all these changes you have enabled and supported,” she said. “I know that we’ll be depending on you for the next 25 years, and I look forward to celebrating your 50th anniversary.”Indeed, many of the honorees wondered how time could pass so quickly. Susan St. Martin found her first job at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) via a Boston Globe classified ad, an experience that would likely seem foreign to her younger colleagues. Since then, she said, her co-workers have become a second family.“We’ve all grown together, watched our children grow up and go to college,” said St. Martin, now a patient services liaison in the teaching practice of HSDM.Some recalled life-changing moments of their Harvard tenure. Wendy Chandler, a staff assistant in the Office of Community Affairs, called watching South African leader Nelson Mandela speak at Harvard in 1986 when he accepted an honorary degree “the highlight of my career.”For others, the 25-year milestone conjured bittersweet memories.“I used to have hair when I started here,” lamented Jaime Moreno, an animal quarters supervisor with FAS Animal Resources, who works at the Bio Labs. Still, when asked how Harvard has changed him, Moreno insisted, “I’m 25 years younger.”An elementary school teacher in his native El Salvador, Moreno got his Harvard job by chance. His brother was supposed to interview for the position but couldn’t make it.Handling rats, weasels, and other animals in the lab didn’t phase Moreno — “the work was exciting and different” — but learning to work a desktop did. “I was scared to touch a computer,” he recalled. Over time, Harvard became an important part of his life.“It’s not just a place to work. It’s also a place to be proud of,” he said. “Where I work is where science begins. Our group helps to make life for humanity better.”For a moment, it almost seemed as if he’d forgotten Harvard was honoring him, rather than the other way around.“From the bottom of my heart, I’m grateful,” Moreno said.center_img ‘Institutional memory’ “You are the institutional memory; you are the institutional identity,” President Drew Faust told the crowd of more than 200 honorees, family members, and co-workers gathered at the Harvard Faculty Club. ‘Institutional memory’ Distinguished guests Awardee Roger Joujoute (right), mail room staff assistant at Harvard Kennedy School, poses with his dapper son, Jens, and Ursule Dumornay. Honoriffic Honorees listen to President Drew Faust’s talk, including Philip Sadler (left), Frances W. Wright Senior Lecturer on Celestial Navigation, and Katherine Kraft (far right), senior archivist at the Schlesinger Library. Cake walk More than 200 celebrated Harvard employees dined on this festive cake, which helped ring in their 25th year of service at Harvard.last_img read more

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Stratford Shakespeare Festival’s Twelfth Night Coming to Movie Theaters

first_img Take a look at a clip from the production below! View Comments The show, helmed by Tony-winning director Des McAnuff, premiered in Canada in 2011 and featured a live pop-rock score composed by McAnuff and Michael Roth. Soon we’ll be able to grab our popcorn and snowcaps and rock out to…Shakespeare? The Stratford Shakespeare Festival’s pop-rock revival of Twelfth Night, starring Tony winner Brian Dennehy, could potentially air in movie theaters worldwide later this year. According to Variety, Broadway Near You, the company behind bringing Driving Miss Daisy starring Angela Lansbury and James Earl Jones to cinemas, has acquired the theatrical and home entertainment distribution rights to the production. The filmed production was released in Canada in 2012, but Broadway Near You is looking to expand the production’s reach by bringing it to theaters around the world. The company’s founder, Ed Greenberg, revealed that they aim to build up to distributing 15 to 20 filmed theatrical productions per year. More live theater at the movies and on our TV? Count us in.last_img read more

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Cotton Market

first_imgImproved crop conditions across the nation have played a major role in driving cotton prices down dramatically over the past four months, says a University of Georgia economist.Since early May, when 2014 cotton was selling for more than 80 cents per pound, the price of cotton has dropped 18 cents, or about 20 percent. It is now well below the 80-cent barometer that UGA Extension agricultural economist Don Shurley believes all farmers strive for to cover their production costs.“Let’s remember that we’ve had two or three years of consecutive drought situations in Texas, plus the fact that we’ve had two good years where China was buying a lot of cotton and building stocks. That combination led to some real good prices — 80, 85 cents or better,” Shurley said. “This drought situation in Texas is much relieved. The crop conditions are much better than they have been in previous years.”Some 17.5 million bales of cotton are expected this year, up 46 percent from last year’s 12.9 million bales, Shurley said.An improved crop means supply is outweighing demand, though China is still forecasted to import eight million bales. In years past, Texas farmers abandoned 40 percent of their acreage after receiving little, if any, rainfall. That’s not the case this year, Shurley said. At the current price of 67cents per pound, cotton farmers are not making a profit. They’re not even breaking even. “If you take the cost of production — seed, fertilizer, chemicals, fuel — and then you add higher labor and added land rent on top of that (for some), at 60 to 65 cents, cotton farmers are losing money big time,” Shurley said. “A lot of folks are starting to wonder what we’re going to be like in 2015.”Prices for the 2015 crop are currently in the 68 to 70 cents per pound range. Enduring back-to-back years of below-average prices could be devastating for Georgia cotton farmers, and there may not be any alternatives for farmers to grow. All row-crop commodities are experiencing a dip in prices, especially corn, which has fallen below $4 per bushel. Soybeans have been hurt the least by the market but are not a good fit for regular rotations used by many Georgia farmers.Shurley said 10.7 million bales of cotton are expected to be exported from the United States this year, a little more than the 10.5 million recorded last year. For more cotton news, go to ugacotton.com.last_img read more

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NYPA, environmental justice groups to consider clean options for replacing New York City gas peakers

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Utilities operating fossil-fueled power plants, and the low-income and disadvantaged communities that face the brunt of their pollution, may have a new model for resolving their differences.On Tuesday, the New York Power Authority signed a landmark agreement with the Peak Coalition, a group of five environmental justice and clean energy groups, to study ways to replace or reduce emissions from NYPA’s six gas-fired peaker plant sites in New York City and Long Island.Tuesday’s memorandum of understanding doesn’t set a hard deadline for closing the plants, which provide about 470 megawatts of capacity to meet downstate New York’s peak-constrained grid needs. But it does offer communities at most risk from their emissions an ongoing role in working with the state’s public power utility to find cost-effective ways to reduce the impact, NYPA CEO Gil Quiniones said in a Wednesday interview.NYPA’s peaker fleet, installed in the early 2000s, doesn’t face the need to close by 2025 under state air-quality regulations, as do older, more polluting peaker plants in downstate New York. But they’ve been the target of legal challenges from groups representing low-income communities at most risk of harm from their emissions. At the same time, New York City faces a shortage of transmission capacity to meet its peak grid demands, and NYPA’s units may become more valuable for meeting those needs as older plants face retirement, Quiniones said. They’re also important for local grid reliability, and several are needed for “black-start” capability to reenergize the grid after power outages, “so we have to be careful” about how to replace them, he said.This is a common problem facing utilities in states such as New York that are pushing to decarbonize their electricity generation fleets, and it doesn’t have an easy answer. California regulators have allowed utilities to replace capacity from the closed San Onofre nuclear power plant with new gas-fired peaker plants, though they also required Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric to seek out batteries, energy efficiency and demand response to meet part of the shortfall.NYPA’s agreement with the Peak Coalition calls for a study of alternatives that can both ensure reliability and reduce the amount of emissions its peaker plants emit during the roughly 10 percent of the year they’re called into service, Quiniones said. Beyond NYPA’s in-house experts, “we’ll hire consultants and hire a sub-consultant to advise the environmental justice groups, so they know it’s not biased, that it’s fact-based,” he said. “The first thing we’ll consider seriously is installing existing storage technology on a hybrid basis,” using batteries to augment power plant capacity, Quiniones said.[Jeff St. John]More: NYPA, environmental justice groups to work together on peaker plant replacements NYPA, environmental justice groups to consider clean options for replacing New York City gas peakerslast_img read more

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Trump a narcissist shaped by bullying father, says niece in memoir

first_img‘Clown’Mary is the son of Fred Trump Jr, Trump’s older brother, who died in 1981 from complications related to alcoholism. Fred Trump Sr died in 1999.She writes that her uncle meets all the clinical criteria for being a narcissist, according to the New York Times.”Donald’s pathologies are so complex and his behaviors so often inexplicable that coming up with an accurate and comprehensive diagnosis would require a full battery of psychological and neurophysical tests that he’ll never sit for,” she writes.The memoir is also due to reveal that Mary was the crucial source for explosive New York Times reporting on Trump’s finances, which suggested the billionaire paid little in tax for decades, according to The Daily Beast.In the book, she quotes her sister Maryanne Trump Barry as “saying he’s a clown — this will never happen,” after Trump announced he was running for president.It is set to be the latest bombshell book to dish dirt on Trump after former aide John Bolton’s tome, which describes Trump as corrupt and incompetent, hit shelves last month. She writes that Trump developed “twisted behaviors” and saw “cheating as a way of life,” according to the New York Times.Trump alleges that the future US leader cheated on an exam, helping him get into the University of Pennsylvania’s prestigious Wharton business school, the newspaper reported.She says her uncle paid someone else to take the precollegiate test when he was a high school student in New York. The Times doesn’t say how she knew this.The 240-page book, out July 14, says Trump is a product of his “sociopath” father Fred Trump, the Washington Post reported. Donald Trump’s niece describes the US president as a lying narcissist who was shaped by his domineering father, according to excerpts of her eagerly anticipated memoir carried in US media Tuesday.Mary Trump’s “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man” is due out next week amid a legal battle to stop its publication.In it, she accuses Trump of “hubris and willful ignorance” stretching back to his younger days, according to CNN, which has seen a copy. Mary, a clinical psychologist, says her uncle failed to develop human emotion because his father created an abusive and traumatic homelife.She says that for the future US leader, “lying was primarily a mode of self-aggrandizement meant to convince other people he was better than he actually was,” the Post said.The memoir is billed as the first unflattering portrayal of Trump by a family insider.The president’s younger brother Robert Trump went to court to try to block publication, arguing that Mary was violating a non-disclosure agreement signed in 2001 after the settlement over her grandfather’s estate.Last week a New York appeals judge ruled that Simon & Schuster is allowed to release the memoir, saying it was “not a party to the agreement.”On Tuesday, White House spokesperson Kayleigh McEnany described it as “a book of falsehoods,” even though she admitted she hadn’t seen it.”It’s ridiculous, absurd allegations that have absolute no bearing in truth,” McEnany told reporters. Topics :last_img read more

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