Utah Men’s Swimming and Diving Team Honored By CSCAA

first_img Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Tuesday, Utah men’s swimming and diving was selected as a Scholar All-American Team.The Utah men’s team had a 3.11 GPA, ranking third among Pac-12 schools.Furthermore, the Utes had six student-athletes named to the Pac-12’s all-academic first team earlier this year, the most in the conference.First-team honorees included senior fly Ben Scott of Steilacoom, Wash., senior distance free Brandon Shreeve of Corvallis, Ore., Daniel Theriault, a junior diver out of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, sophomore distance free/breast Brody Lewis of Greeley, Colo., sophomore distance free Matteo Sogne of Modena, Italy, and sophomore back/breast/free/IM Jeremy Young of Casper, Wyo.Making the second team were senior breast Jack Burton of Ringwood, England, junior free/fly/M Austin Phillips of Centennial, Ohio, senior fly Chris Taber of Rancho Santa, Calif., and sophomore free Rahiti De Vos of Nice, France.This award is presented twice annually, once in the fall semester and again in the spring, to recognize teams achieving a 3.0 GPA during the semester. June 19, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah Men’s Swimming and Diving Team Honored By CSCAA Written by Tags: Austin Phillips/Ben Scott/Brandon Shreeve/Brody Lewis/Chris Taber/Daniel Theriault/Jack Burton/Jeremy Young/Matteo Sogne/Rahiti De Vos/Utah Scholar All-America Teamlast_img read more

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Tedeschi Trucks Band Closes Out Their Ryman Run With A Powerful Performance

first_imgYou know you’re doing something right if you get to play three nights of music at the historic Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, TN. The famed venue has played host to countless incredible performances throughout the years, and over the last three nights, Tedeschi Trucks Band has had the opportunity to call the place home. The band’s remarkable soul-influenced sound was on full display for the final night of the run yesterday, March 4th, playing a potent blend of original music and beloved covers.The band started strong out of the gate with their songs “Laugh About It” and “Don’t Know What It Means,” and would keep the energy going with their famed cover of Derek & The Dominos’ “Anyday.” The band also covered Delaney & Bonnie’s “Comin’ Home,” George Jones’ “Color of the Blues,” and Billy Taylor’s “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free,” as well as Blind Willie McTell’s “Statesboro Blues,” The Staple Singers’ “Freedom Highway,” Sleepy John Estes’ “Leaving Trunk,” Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s “Volunteered Slavery,” B.B. King’s “How Blue Can You Get,” Santana’s “Soul Sacrifice,” and the closer, a rendition of The Beatles’ “With A Little Help From My Friends.” It was quite the night of music.Watch a video of the second set opener, Tedeschi Trucks Band’s original song “Midnight in Harlem,” streaming below, courtesy of Chuck Michel.You can also watch a video of the encore, “With A Little Help From My Friends,” below, courtesy of Brady Turner.Check out the setlist below. Photo courtesy of Brandon Weil.last_img read more

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At last, the edible science fair

first_imgHot ice cream. Solid soup. Glow-in-the-dark gummy bears.Such foods may sound like science fiction, but they were just a few of the final projects on display Tuesday (Dec. 7) for the SPU27: “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter” science fair. Illustrating the tenacious bond between science and cooking, students used physics, chemistry, and biology to manipulate recipes and create foods that stretch the imagination.“This is the kind of science class I knew I wouldn’t have if I went anywhere else,” said freshman Matt Menendez, as he stood in front of his display on how to create perfect whipped cream.“Now when I go to the grocery store, I can pick up a pint of cream, see that it has carrageenan and mono- and diglycerides in it, and a). know why they’re in there, and b.) decide if I want them in there, or if I’ll buy cream without them.”The class has drawn widespread interest. About 700 students applied for the 300 or so spots in it. Lectures held each Monday have been packed. News articles about the class have appeared in publications across the globe. Led by David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, students were introduced to scientific principles that were then linked to cooking. For example, a lesson on measuring and changing viscosity led to the creation of fruit gels, while a lesson on chemical reactions resulted in the cooking of caramels.“The science makes it more real,” said Kate Caputo, a junior concentrating in engineering and astrophysics. “I can make cookies from a recipe, no problem, but if I want to manipulate the recipe or change it, I need to understand the science behind what’s happening.”Understanding the science led Caputo and her team to create the glowing gummy bears. Though the team originally envisioned using bioluminescent algae, most of them are toxic and not suitable for ingestion. Quinine, which glows in the dark due to its molecular structure, proved to be a good alternative. Using tonic water (which contains quinine), the team experimented to determine the right ratio of gel and flavors so that the candies glowed, set, and tasted good.A team composed of top chefs from around the world was on hand to judge the student projects. Many had lectured in the course during the semester, and some had provided students with project ideas based on particular challenges they’d faced in their own kitchens.For example, Chef Wylie Dufresne, of wd~50 in New York City, told students about his challenges in creating a noodle made entirely of Parmesan cheese. While the kitchen had a suitable recipe, the noodles took far too long to dry and crumbled when boiled. A team composed of Katie Chang, history and literature senior, Cody Evans, an economics junior, and Sophie Wharton, a psychology and neuroscience senior, tackled the problem, looking at the protein structures of various cheeses, and hypothesizing that stronger protein chains would lead to better noodles. They then combined the Parmesan with RM, a meat glue that contains sodium caseinate, which has proteins that aided in the cohesion of the noodles.“Finding the right ratio of RM was a challenge,” Wharton said. “We made noodles that were like rubber bands. They were nothing you want to put in your mouth.”Ultimately, the team found a winning recipe: a chewy, stable cheese noodle that looks and feels like pasta but has an intense Parmesan flavor.“We’ve been working on this for a year, and they did it in two weeks,” said John McCarthy, a chef at wd~50 who was on hand to judge the student projects.Likewise, James Beard Award-winning chef Barbara Lynch turned to the SPU27 students to help her find a better, gluten-free pasta for her Boston restaurant Sportello.“We set out to try different binding agents to add to the pasta in order to recreate the taste, texture, and properties of traditional pasta dough,” said junior Erica Seidel, who worked on the project with junior Michelle Burschtin and senior Jennifer Kusma.The students experimented with different binding agents and sorghum flour — a staple in gluten-free cooking. They then performed a series of experiments that established a correlation between the breaking point of a noodle and its mouth feel. Their research earned them a top spot in the science fair, and a trip to Spain’s Alicia Foundation, which collaborated with Harvard in the class. The trio will be joined by Bethania Bacigalupe, who also won for her work researching adding gels to soup stocks so they are stable at higher temperatures.“What Harvard is doing in the teaching of food and science is incredible,” Lynch said. “It’s going to make a big difference in cooking evolution and helping health factors. We don’t have a lot of chances to spend time on the science of food in the kitchen, so putting chefs and students together on a project has been really rewarding.”last_img read more

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Vitamin D protects some against colorectal cancer

first_imgA new study by investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, a Harvard affiliate, demonstrates that vitamin D can protect some people with colorectal cancer by perking up the immune system’s vigilance against tumor cells.The research, published today by the journal Gut, represents the first time that a link between vitamin D and the immune response to cancer has been shown in a large human population. The finding adds to a growing body of research showing that vitamin D — known as the “sunshine vitamin” because it is produced by the body in response to sunlight exposure — plays a key role in cancer prevention.“People with high levels of vitamin D in their bloodstream have a lower overall risk of developing colorectal cancer,” said the study’s senior author, Shuji Ogino of Dana-Farber, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “Laboratory research suggests that vitamin D boosts immune system function by activating T cells that recognize and attack cancer cells. In this study, we wanted to determine if these two phenomena are related: Does vitamin D’s role in the immune system account for the lower rates of colorectal cancer in people with high circulating levels of the vitamin?”Ogino and his colleagues theorized that if the two phenomena were connected, then people with high levels of vitamin D would be less likely to develop colorectal tumors permeated with large numbers of immune-system cells. Colorectal tumors that do develop in these individuals would, by the same logic, be more resistant to the immune response.To determine if this was in fact the case, the research team drew on data from 170,000 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, two long-term health-tracking research projects. Within this population, the scientists compared carefully selected groups of 318 colorectal cancer patients and 624 cancer-free individuals. All 942 of them had blood samples drawn in the 1990s, before any developed cancer. The investigators tested these samples for 25-hydroxyvitamin D — abbreviated 25(OH)D — a substance produced in the liver from vitamin D.They found that patients with high amounts of 25(OH)D indeed had a lower-than-average risk of developing colorectal tumors that were enriched with immune-system cells.“This is the first study to show evidence of the effect of vitamin D on anti-cancer immune function in actual patients, and vindicates basic laboratory discoveries that vitamin D can interact with the immune system to raise the body’s defenses against cancer,” Ogino said. “In the future, we may be able to predict how increasing an individual’s vitamin D intake and immune function can reduce his or her risk of colorectal cancer.”Funding for the study was provided by the National Institutes of Health, the Friends of Dana-Farber, the Bennett Family Foundation, the Entertainment Industry Foundation, and the Paula and Russell Agrusa Fund for Colorectal Cancer Research.last_img read more

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I AM Presentations Offers New Services To Newspapers and Magazines

first_imgI AM Presentations is pleased to announce that it will be offering a new web content delivery system and advertising solution exclusively to the newspaper and magazine market. The new solutions feature dynamic setups that allow for publishers to capitalize on and expand with the Internet by providing a seamless workflow process between offline and online issues. In addition, these services create various avenues of additional revenue for publishers and provide a professional level of content delivery.After more than a year of testing and development, I AM Presentations releases this new service with confidence that it will aid publishers in meeting new Internet delivery demands more effectively, while reducing costs and increasing online advertising revenues. President of I AM Presentations, Michael LaRocque, says, “our professional service has been born of intense interaction with diverse and crucial markets. Our services are formulated to meet unique and exacting needs of publishers as they attempt to migrate or expand with their brands on the web in a successful and efficient manner.”I AM Presentations is a web design and development firm that was started in 2001. It specializes in online content delivery systems and advertising solutions for media publications.Michael LaRocque previously worked at Small Dog Electronics where he was the Chief Editor of their five eNewsletters with a circulation of over 60,000 subscribers. He has been involved in website development since he was employed at Lehman Brothers Bank in New York City.last_img read more

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Answering the indirect question

first_img 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brian Wringer Former watermelon farmer Brian Wringer wears several hats for iDiz Incorporated, including Web Projects Manager, Wordsmith, and Big Idea Guy. He builds better credit unions by day and weird old … Web: www.cuidiz.com Details One of the more intriguing marketing problems we’ve encountered with our credit union clients is “what should we do with all these indirect members”? To be clear, we’re talking about members who have joined the CU by getting a car loan at a car dealer. Many times, they have only the base savings account and the car loan, and they’ve probably never set foot in a branch. When the car loan is paid off, they vanish.The numbers vary tremendously, but there are credit unions with thousands of indirect members on the books. Can they be “converted” to long-term, participating members? There’s no single solution that fits every credit union, but there are a few “indirect” questions that can help you decide.Does it even make sense to try?At some CUs with robust indirect lending programs, indirect members are treated and tracked separately, almost as a CUSO or an investment. They’re a source of steady interest income, but for whatever reasons it’s not considered worth the effort to convert them to fully participating members.How big is our welcome mat?One option is to get serious about onboarding — make sure these members see the CU as more than a place to send a loan payment. Make them feel welcomed and invited with regular contacts (email, direct mail, etc.) during the first several months. They chose your loan mostly because of your great rate, so make sure you “show them the money” at every opportunity, and consider making an extra-super-duper-special offer.Should we go deeper?Perhaps it’s worth reaching for the reading glasses and taking a deeper dive into the data. It might make a lot of sense to send targeted, prequalified offers to consolidate credit cards, refinance other auto loans in the household, or refinance mortgages. Or maybe you could tweak your processes a bit to automatically offer a Visa to every indirect borrower.Can we answer this in the laboratory?It may take some experimentation to fine-tune your approach to investing in indirect members. You might need to try focusing your efforts on indirect members who live or work close to a branch, since they’re more likely to be open to a closer relationship. Or try sending one set of offers to used car buyers, another to new car buyers.There are plenty more options, and the right answers to the “indirect question” are different for every credit union. You’ll need to work with your management, your loan department and your marketing vendors to develop indirect goals and a strategy. But it can be well worth asking — every member you retain and convert from “indirect” to “participating” has a direct impact on membership growth.last_img read more

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Leadership Matters: Good leaders don’t play favorites

first_imgBeing a leader has certain similarities to being a parent. As a parent, you love all your children equally. Yet you still must work to avoid the appearance of playing favorites and make sure you devote equal time and attention to each child.When leading a team in the workplace, whether you’re a CEO or a middle manager, you face the same type of challenge. Favoring one employee over others for factors unrelated to performance creates havoc on a team, but leaders commonly fail in this basic area. A study by Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Businessfound that 84 percent of surveyed executives saw favoritism at work in their own organizations. Almost a quarter (23 percent) even acknowledged practicing it themselves.The perception of favoritism goes beyond who gets raises, bonuses or promotions. How many times have you seen a CEO and one of his or her executives attached at the hip, to the exclusion of other execs on his team? How many times have you worked for a manager who gave information to one or two of your colleagues while leaving everyone else in the dark? continue reading » 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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E coli in Topps beef traced to Canadian firm

first_imgOct 29, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The source of Escherichia coli O157:H7 that recently spurred a massive recall of ground beef by Topps Meat Co. probably was contaminated beef trim from a Canadian firm, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently announced. Among the new federal safety measures for ground beef, the USDA is requiring more testing of domestic and imported ground beef components and will notify countries that export beef to the United States about new policies and programs to control the pathogen. The company that supplied Topps, based in Elizabeth, N.J., with the contaminated beef was Ranchers Beef, Ltd., based near Calgary, Alta. The firm ceased operations on Aug 15, but the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) obtained and tested some of the company’s product that had been in storage and then notified US officials of its E coli O157:H7 findings. In related developments, New Jersey officials announced recently that its inspectors were able to buy boxes of the recalled Topps beef at a retail store 4 weeks after the product was recalled, according to an Oct 25 report from the Associated Press. Oct 9 CIDRAP News story “Spike in E coli–related beef recalls alarms officials” See also: On the three days when the company was known to have produced contaminated batches of beef, it was grinding both domestic and foreign trimmings, the Times reported. Federal investigators at the Topps plant found that the company had reduced its microbial testing on finished ground beef from once a month to three times a year, according to an Oct 23 report in the New York Times. The company also had failed to require adequate testing on beef from its domestic suppliers, and, like other producers, had increased its purchases of meat from overseas, where testing is not always required, the Times report said. The Topps recall was the largest of several recalls related to E coli in ground beef this year. On Oct 23 the FSIS introduced a number of regulatory measures designed to reduce E coli contamination in ground beef. The FSIS said it had delisted Ranchers Beef on Oct 20, meaning none of the company’s products have been eligible for import since that date. The agency announced that it was placing a hold on Ranchers beef, along other products made from Ranchers beef, until the USDA and CFIA complete their investigation. DNA fingerprinting has linked the strain of E coli O157:H7 found in trim from the Canadian company to an E coli outbreak involving 40 illnesses in eight US states and 45 illnesses and one death in five Canadian provinces, according to an Oct 26 press release from the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). E coli in samples from the Canadian company also matched the strain that health officials in New York found in intact and opened packages of Topps ground beef from the homes of patients. Oct 26 FSIS press releasehttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/NR_102607_01/index.asp A notice on the Ranchers Beef Web site said the company’s plant was for sale. On Sep 25, Topps said it was going out of business immediately because it could not handle the economic burden of recalling 21.7 million pounds of ground beef. “We appreciate the assistance from our food safety partners in Canada. This piece of information helped us to determine a likely source of contaminated product, which led to the Sep 29 Topps Meat Company expanded recall,” Richard Raymond, USDA under secretary for food safety, said in the press release. Oct 23 CIDRAP News story “USDA announces plans to reduce E coli contamination in ground beef”last_img read more

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How can others trust our country now?

first_imgCadet bone spurs pulled the United States out of the TransPacific Parnership, thus inviting China to be the economic leader of the dynamic Pacific Rim countries. He pulled the United States out of the Paris Climate Accords, thus flaunting his ignorance of climate science.He now pulls out of the Iran nuclear agreement, overriding the objections of people and nations who know far more about the situation than he will ever know. Given these precedents, how can North and South Korea, indeed any country, trust the United States to abide by international agreements it is a part of?NORRINE THOMPSONTED THOMPSONSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Troopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashSchenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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Government vows to continue coastal, port infrastructure development

first_img“Industries located in East Bekasi and Karawang in West Java can use Patimban seaport in the future, while industries in West Bekasi and Tangerang will continue to use Tanjung Priok seaport. Therefore, the seaport will support logistics connectivity,” he said.He added that the Japan-backed Patimban seaport project was scheduled for partial operation in December, a month later than previously estimated by Public Works and Housing Minister Basuki Hadimuljono.Patimban seaport is one of the government’s national strategic projects, funded by an official development assistance (ODA) loan from the Japanese government amounting to Rp 14.2 trillion for the first development phase.The port is expected to be Indonesia’s primary export port and to ease the burden on Tanjung Priok port and traffic congestion in Jakarta from the transport of cargo. It is also projected to support the future Rebana Special Economic Zones (SEZ) in Cirebon, Patimban and Kertajati in West Java, along with Kertajati International Airport.In the first development phase, Patimban seaport is planned to serve 3.75 million twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) and accommodate 600,000 complete built-up (CBU) vehicles. Meanwhile, in the second phase, Patimban’s capacity will increase to 5.5 million TEUs and it is expected to reach its final capacity of 7.5 million TEUs in phase 3.Besides Patimban seaport, Wae Kelambu Multipurpose Seaport in Labuan Baju, East Nusa Tenggara has also shown significant progress as 29.8 percent of its water infrastructure construction and 26.8 percent of its land infrastructure were completed, Rusli said.The government is developing Wae Kelambu seaport to boost tourist visits to Labuan Bajo, which is one of the government’s super-priority tourist destinations. The seaport will be designated for logistics and container handling, while the Labuan Bajo seaport will handle inbound tourists and passengers.Topics : Massive infrastructure development has been one of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s main priorities. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has halted several infrastructure projects as the government reallocates its budget to fund its fight against the disease while the outbreak disrupts construction activity.In addition to the NCICD project, the ministry also vowed to continue the coastal barrier development in the northern part of West Java, Jakarta, Central Java and East Java provinces, which stretches for 59.1 kilometers in total and costs around Rp 641.5 billion, as well as the 27-km-long Semarang-Demak toll road in Central Java.The ministry’s transportation infrastructure deputy Rusli Rahim said in the statement that various port development projects, including the Patimban seaport project in Subang regency in West Java, were showing progress.According to the ministry’s data, the Patimban seaport terminal and reclamation project had reached 81.9 percent completion as of Sept. 13, while the access bridge construction progress had reached 11.9 percent completion as of Sept. 16. The Office of the Coordinating Maritime Affairs and Investment Minister has vowed to continue port and coastal infrastructure development projects, including the National Capital Integrated Coastal Development (NCICD) and Patimban seaport, an official has said.The NCICD project aims to prevent coastal flooding and land subsidence as some parts of the capital city, especially near the northern coast, are sinking up to 12 centimeters a year. The project requires Rp 600 trillion (US$40.22 billion) of investment, according to the Committee for Acceleration of Priority Infrastructure Delivery’s (KPPIP) data.“The project will reduce the potential for natural disasters, pollution and environmental damage. Furthermore, it will push Jakarta to become a safe metropolitan area,” the ministry’s assistant deputy for infrastructure, urban and water resources, Rahman Hidayat, said in a statement on Monday.last_img read more

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