Keble College under pressure to reverse admissions decision

first_imgThese proposals come after significant backlash from the student community, both over the rescinding of offers and the College’s statement explaining its position.  Students have been encouraged to volunteer before the College’s academic committee meets tomorrow morning. The JCR President explains this “would really help put forward a robust case to admit all Keble offer holders this academic year.” The JCR President has described this as a “very practical solution to the problem” that will remove the need for appeals, resits or deferred entry and allow those “who were rejected on the grounds of capacity” to study at Keble in 2020/21.  The JCR President has warned that “there will be some short term uncertainty with regards to accommodation for those who volunteer”. Whilst no guarantee has been given, “college anticipates they will be able to find accommodation for those 2nd and 3rd years that do help out in this situation.” The letter argues that Ofqual’s moderation process was flawed and has “entrenched systematic bias against students from lower performing schools and larger class sizes, regardless of individual ability.” Much more reliable as an indicator of ability, suggests the letter, is the admissions tests and interviews that former offer holders have already succeeded in. However Keble argued that it had done all it could to accommodate these circumstances, stating that more offer holders than usual had met the necessary conditions. Noting how “Oxford revised the guidelines on clemency” to give “more even weight to indicators of social disadvantage”, the College argued it scrutinised cases on an individual basis, but was ultimately limited by available space. “The more students we admit this year,” the statement said, “the fewer we will be able to admit next year and the year after.”  Being dissatisfied with the moderated grades is not grounds for an appeal under Ofqual guidelines. At the moment it is assumed that dissatisfied students will have to pay to ‘re-sit’ exams if they want to improve their grades. Keble’s academic committee will meet tomorrow to further discuss the issue. The College has expressed interest in one of the proposals, asking a group of “up to 12” second or third year students to voluntarily move out of college into private accommodation for the coming academic year.  An Open Letter from Keble alumni to the College has been published on Facebook. Responding to this petition, the letter called on the College to disregard the grades assigned by Ofqual and to “make a firm statement of support for those students unfairly disadvantaged by this national moderation process” and to “offer them places to study.” This year, 70% of Keble’s undergraduate offers to UK applicants were given to students from state schools. In its statement earlier this weekend, the College stated it was aware “how the method of allocating grades without actual examinations would systematically disadvantage students from schools and neighbourhoods with less history of sending people to Oxbridge.” The statement followed growing pressure on the College to re-think its decision. Over 6,000 people have signed a petition calling for Oxford to reverse its decision to rescind offers to “state school ‘near misses’”. center_img Femi-Gureje has identified this as a “huge access issue”, warning about the unaffordable cost of re-sits. She adds, “Whilst it is not the fault of the University that the grading system is so flawed, this doesn’t really give much solace to those who have had to bear the brunt of its failures.” There are calls for the University to do more to support exceptional students and for greater transparency in the decision-making process.  Keble College and Keble JCR President have been contacted for comment. On August 15th, Keble issued a statement that they were “not able to accept every offer holder”. Since then, Keble’s JCR President and a team of current students and alumni have written a letter to the College suggesting several alternative proposals for the accommodation of those offer holders who were not accepted. The JCR President has explained more in a statement posted to the students’ Facebook group. Speaking to Cherwell, President of Keble At Large and JCR Access and Academic Affairs Officer, Busola Femi-Gureje, has described the University’s decision as the “antithesis of the message promoted by access schemes and initiatives” due to its reliance on a “biased” algorithm that appears to disregard the academic achievement of students in disadvantaged areas.  Keble’s decision to rescind some offers has been particularly disappointing due to the extensive efforts made by Keble staff, students, and alumni to widen access through schemes like Keble At Large. The authors of the letter believe that rescinding offers will “totally undermine” the progress made by these projects. The College claims it will welcome those students who are successful in the appeal process, and intends to exercise sympathy when processing the applications of those taking their exams this autumn.   The petition prompted an outpouring of support from the Keble College community, including a number of alumni.  She stated “the situation this year feels even more unfair than previous years as students didn’t even get to sit the exams that resulted in them missing their grades.” The creator of this petition had her offer to read Geography at Keble College rescinded, after her results were downgraded from A*A*A* to AAA. She has expressed her frustration at the University for apparently not considering her background in its decision-making process. The College is preparing to welcome a large and diverse cohort in October, stating “more offers were made to, and more students will come from, under-represented and/or disadvantaged neighbourhoods.”   After students and alumni pressed Keble College to admit all students regardless of A Level results, the College is considering accommodation arrangements to increase their capacity. last_img read more

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New law mandates Indiana schools test for lead contamination

first_img Twitter Twitter By Associated Press – March 31, 2020 0 286 WhatsApp New law mandates Indiana schools test for lead contamination Previous articleMichigan coronavirus numbers report another 1000+ cases on MondayNext articleMichigan’s Carhartt to spend much of April making medical gear Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications. Pinterest IndianaLocalNews (“Faucet” by https://www.flickr.com/photos/joeshlabotnik/, CC BY 2.0) INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Drinking water fountains and taps at public and private schools in Indiana must be tested for lead contamination by 2023 under a new state law.Every school’s drinking water equipment has to be tested by Jan. 1, 2023 and take action if results show lead at higher than 15 parts per billion.Lake County schools will have to test every two years.Officials will have to do something about the lead contamination if it exceeds that threshold.The state received a grant from the Indiana Finance Authority to cover the costs of testing. WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook Google+ Facebook Google+last_img read more

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Correspondence: Commissioners and providers of social care: Brexit planning update

first_img medicines and consumables non-clinical consumables goods and services the adult social care workforce The letters ask the adult social care system to ensure business continuity plans are in place so local areas are able to manage the possible implications of Brexit.They include plans relating to: This guidance has been replaced by Actions for adult social care providers to prepare for Brexit.,Stay up to dateThese letters tell you what to do if there is a no-deal Brexit. This page will be updated if anything changes, including if a deal is agreed.Sign up for email alerts to get the latest information.center_img The letters were published alongside the Brexit operational readiness guidance for the health and social care system with a covering letter from Sir Chris Wormald.last_img read more

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Crimson get weekend split

first_imgAfter No. 2 Clarkson handed the Harvard women’s hockey team its second defeat of the season Nov. 6 by a score of 2-1, the No. 10-ranked Crimson picked themselves up and responded forcefully Nov. 7 with a 3-0 shutout of No. 7 St. Lawrence for the Crimson’s (2-2; 2-2 ECAC) 500th win in the program’s history.Freshman forward Kaitlin Spurling got the Crimson going first against Clarkson, tallying her first career goal less than six minutes into the second period. But Clarkson bounced back, scoring midway though the second period and once more to start the third, handing the Crimson just their sixth home loss in four seasons.But the Crimson came out firing against the Saints, outshooting St. Lawrence, 28-14. Harvard forward Kate Buesser ’11 was the offensive catalyst, scoring twice and assisting on the other goal.Last season, Harvard graduated one of the most-talented senior classes in program history, including 2008 Patty Kazmaier (Player of the Year) winner Sarah Vaillancourt. But expectations remain high for the Crimson. In the ECAC Hockey Preseason Poll, Harvard was picked to finish second behind St. Lawrence, and was ranked No. 8 in the USA Today/USA Hockey Magazine Preseason Poll.The Crimson take the ice again this weekend when they host Quinnipiac on Nov. 13, at 7 p.m., and Princeton on Nov. 14 at 4 p.m.last_img read more

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Lecturer rejects stigma of online dating

first_imgIn the 21st century, technology revolutionized nearly every aspect of learning and educating, but it also changed the face of a much more personal aspect of our lives: dating.  Dr. Elizbeth Ribarsky, assistant professor of communications at the University of Illinois, Springfield hosted a talk on “Dating in the Digital Age,” in the Hospitality Room of South Dining Hall on Thursday.  The lecture functioned as a how-to guide introducing audience members to online dating and warned about common mistakes they can make in setting up a profile and interacting with individuals online. Ribarsky said her goal in the lecture was to remove the stigma from online dating. “The stigma is that only creepy people go online,” Ribarsky said. “Or that they’re desperate. Or that they may not be anybody of who they say they actually are. Even though we see a huge influx in the number of individuals engaging in online dating and the number of individuals getting married from online relationships, there is still a level of stigmatization.”  Online dating is very functional because it allows an individual to cast a wide net and sort through people who they may or may not be interested much more quickly than face-to-face interaction, Ribarsky said. She said a drawback comes when people misrepresent themselves online. “Men, on average, exaggerate their height by one inch,” Ribarsky said. “Women, on average, tend to underreport their weight by about 15 pounds.” Ribarsky said the typical pool of online daters could be broken up into four categories: romantics, junkies, disappearing acts and realists. She said romantics often, “think falling in love online is awesome and wonderful and begin to feel these notions of love before they even meet somebody.”  A realist, Ribarsky said, “recognizes that online dating, or any form of technology, and how it influences our relationships is simply another tool that allows us to meet people. They realize they are not going to immediately fall in love with the people they meet online.” She said she would encourage all of the audience members to take this approach to dating in the digital age.  Ribarsky said there are a plethora of different dating sites from which an individual can choose to sign up, ranging from interest based sites to matching sites to sites that charge a fee to sign up. “Pay for self-selecting sites require that you pay to sign up,” Ribarsky said. “Typically, when individuals are willing to pay for a site they are, perhaps, a little bit more serious about wanting to find somebody.” When it comes to choosing a site, Ribarsky said it could be helpful to put a filter on one’s contacts in order to pinpoint responses from a specific age group or geographical area.  “Interestingly, each site develops their own reputation,” Ribarsky said. “Match [of Match.com] is one of the largest companies. They have famously started having ‘stir events,’ which are like mixers. … These stir events give people the comfort that everyone showing up is there with the same purpose.” E Harmony, Match, Christian Mingle and Ourtime are among the most widely used sites, Ribarsky said. She said it is important to create a username that lets a viewer see your interests and to spend time thinking of a headline that is inviting and interesting. Ribarsky said a common mistake made by online daters is to be boring or basic when it is best to be positive and interesting, that way a viewer will be intrigued to learn more information. Lastly, Ribarsky said the profile picture that a person selects could make a major difference in his or her online dating persona.  “Think about anything that you’re showing in your picture is also creating an impression for you,” Ribarsky said. “If your photo is taken outside in the mountains it can give off the impression that I’m outdoorsy. Think about those activities but be conscious of the impression you are putting out there.” She said finding similarities through chatting is key.  “Be specific, tell them about your average Saturday or average Sunday so they know what you’re like.” Ribarsky closed by saying that dating can attract people who misrepresent themselves and deception does happen. She said there is also, at time, a heightened sense of comfort when interacting with people online that encourages people to share more than they might in a face-to-face interaction.  “The one thing that I always stress to people is to just remember that online dating is just another tool to try to find people, the same as going out to a bar or to a church group to meet people,” she said. Ribarsky said maintaining a balanced, honest portrayal online is an individuals’ best bet for success.  “Remember, this is essentially an advertisement for you,” she said. “In any advertisement you will sell the best features of it. But at the same time, don’t boast. This is a time to pick out your best characteristics and highlight those. However, people often undersell themselves too.”  Contact Meg Handelman at [email protected]last_img read more

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Pick-your-own berries

first_imgThe initial cost, he said, can come back in the first season.”If you look at the figures on the 2002 Georgia StrawberryEnterprise Cost Analysis (www.smallfruits.org),” he said, “the estimated medium yield is 1 pound per plant times 15,000 plants per acre, or 15,000 pounds. In those old cotton fields around Georgia, many farmers areconsidering growing something else. For some, it might bestrawberries. Greg Fonsah thinks the future is bright forstrawberries in Georgia. That’s true if a neighboring farm doesn’t have a head start, saysGerard Krewer, a UGA Extension Service horticulturist. Krewersays the market is “overplanted” in some areas. He suggests thatnew farms open at least 30 miles away from an existing one.But Fonsah and Krewer are both confident in the potential forpick-your-own strawberry farms, especially those closer tometropolitan areas and on major highways with heavy traffic.”There’s potential for a ring of farms around Atlanta, where thedemand is much greater,” Krewer said. “It takes around 30,000people to demand 1 acre of strawberries. Some Georgia countiesdon’t have that many citizens.” “Those counties that do grow strawberries, especially pick-your-own, are going to have a good market and good prices,” he said. Supporting agriculture and green space “The benefits are in quality and preservation,” Krewer said.”Supporting local agriculture aids in the preservation of greenspace. And the quality, vine-ripe strawberries you pick can’t befound in stores.” By April ReeseUniversity of Georgia Pick-your-own farms are a part of agritourism, an increasinglypopular trend among city dwellers.In a recent study by UGA agricultural economists, 61 percent ofthe people surveyed said they are likely to visit a farm to pickfresh fruits and vegetables. Many would go 20 or more miles to doit. A few would go 100 miles. Supermarkets sell strawberries that were picked while half-ripeso they don’t spoil during the shipping process, he said. “If you sell it at $1 per pound,” he said, “you’ll end up with areturn of $15,000, all things being equal.”center_img Getting StartedStarting a strawberry farm from scratch costs nearly $20,000 peracre, Fonsah said. Farmers with existing equipment can reducethat by about $9,000. “We have 159 counties, and most of the counties don’t dostrawberries,” said Fonsah, an Extension Service economist withthe University of Georgia College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences. The days of farmers selling directly to local supermarkets seemto be over. “It’s extremely difficult to market strawberries toboth grocery store chains and the public as pick-your-owncommodities,” Krewer said. “Serious growers in Georgia plant 17,000 to 20,000 plants peracre because they have the equipment necessary to do so,” hesaid. “A cotton farmer, on the other hand, would plant about15,000 plants per acre, because they have machines that requirethe rows to be 6 feet apart.” Increasing the number of plants per acre and the total acreagewould improve a grower’s chances of making profit, he said. Farmers expanding into new markets usually plant rows 6 feetapart because they’re using existing farm equipment, Krewer said.Buying special machines to grow strawberries can be costly. “There are hoops to jump through,” he said. “And most big chainsrequire shipping to their main warehouse, which can be as much200 miles away from the farm. The real profit is in direct sales,sales made directly to consumers at retail prices and in pick-your-own markets. However, it’s easy to overproduce.” (April Reese is a student writer with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Legal Roundup:

first_imgLegal Roundup: March 15, 2005 Regular News Legal Roundup: FAWL Chapter Aids Children’s Fund: The doors of Barnes and Noble at City Place opened recently to welcome more than 100 members of the Palm Beach Chapter of the Florida Association for Women Lawyers and their guests who purchased gifts for the Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County’s silent auction to be held on Saturday evening, May 14, as part of the 17th Annual Pro Bono Recognition Evening. In addition, monies were raised for Legal Aid’s Children’s Fund. Over 150 books, toys, and games for the Pro Bono Night Silent Auction were purchased and the event raised over $500 for the Children’s Fund, which provides medicine, clothing, and school supplies to the disadvantaged children in the community. Cuban American Bar Merit Scholarships: The Cuban American Bar Foundation presented the University of Florida College of Law with a $30,000 check to endow a Cuban American Bar Merit Scholarship. This scholarship will be awarded to a Cuban American law student who has distinguished him or herself through outstanding academic achievement or any law student who has become distinguished through outstanding academic achievement and through significant scholarship on the subject of human rights violations in Cuba or the re-establishment of a democratic rule of law in Cuba. CABF endowed the first “Cuban American Bar Scholarship” at the University of Miami School of Law in 2002. Since then it has added Florida International College of Law to its list of endowments. The Fund Gives to Law Schools: Attorneys’ Title Insurance Fund has made gifts totaling $1 million to five Florida law schools whose graduates tend to remain in Florida to practice law. The gifts include $150,000 for a professorship at Florida State University; a $150,000 instructional endowment for Nova Southeastern University’s Shepard Broad Law Center; $250,000 for a professorship at Stetson University College of Law; a $200,000 instructional endowment for the University of Florida Levin College of Law; and a $250,000 scholarship at the University of Miami School of Law. “With these gifts, we are helping fulfill our mission to preserve and facilitate the practice of real estate law,” said Fund President Charles J. Kovaleski. “These gifts are intended to enhance the education of those planning to enter the practice of real estate law.” Wilkerson Award Nominations Sought: The First Central Florida American Inn of Court #123 is currently accepting nominations for the Arnie Wilkerson Memorial Court Service Award, intended to honor persons working in the court system (excluding lawyers and judges) who in their jobs or volunteer work display the highest standards of character, integrity, and ongoing dedication to the judicial system and the public who come in contact with it. The winner will receive a plaque and $500, and have their name added to the plaque hanging in the Orange County Courthouse. Nominees should be sent to: First Central Florida American Inn of Court #123, c/o Virginia Townes, President, Akerman Senterfitt, P.O. Box 231, Orlando, 32802-0231, no later than June 1. JAX ABOTA Lauded : The American Board of Trial Advocates named Jacksonville its Chapter of the Year for 2004 for its outstanding accomplishments. Joshua A. Whitman served as the chapter’s president last year. “The Chapter of the Year Award drew a number of entries making the competition exceptionally tough,” said Donna D. Melby, 2005 national president of ABOTA. “This year’s winner demonstrated an outstanding focus for members, their commitment, and their desire to promote the 7th A mendment’s right to civil trial by jury.”last_img read more

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Nassau to Audit Homeless Shelters After Discrepancies Found

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Freeport homeless shelter’s employees weren’t paid for months—and in one case, nearly two years—auditors found, prompting the Nassau County Comptroller to expand the review to all taxpayer-funded shelters.The audit of Eager to Serve, Inc.’s Sunshine Residence found hourly rates paid to employees were less than the rates mandated by the Living Wage Law—$15.50 an hour without health benefits, or $13.58 with health benefits—for 11 employees from 2012 to 2014 for a total of $4,899, according to the comptroller’s office.“The audit findings are not only very disturbing but may also underscore more extensive issues with the quality of housing provided to our neediest residents,” Nassau County Comptroller George Maragos said. “We intend to open a more extensive audit of the Homeless Shelter Industry on the quality of shelter being provided with taxpayer money.”The county paid the Sunshine Residence more than $650,000 between 2012 and 2014, Maragos said. As a result of the audit’s findings, county officials worry that other homeless shelter funding has been misused.“We intend to fully comply with all rules, laws and mandates and have our attorneys and accountants regularly ensuring compliance,” Levada Felder, executive director of the Sunshine Residence, wrote in her response to the audit’s findings.Discrepancies were found between the numbers of hours employees worked based on their pay stubs versus the hours shown on timesheets, auditors found.Since the audit was completed, Felder started a GoFundMe page with the goal of raising $10,000 for the Sunshine Residence.In addition, she has posted a “Wish List” for the shelter, asking for people to serve the roles of volunteer coordinator, babysitter, carpenter, cleaners, decorators, gardeners, and painters and for donated goods which include bricks, car seats, a new computer, cribs, dishes, metro cards, office furniture and a working car.last_img read more

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2016 Auto lending depends on rates

first_imgA rising tide lifts all ships and the improving economy has certainly lifted the U.S. auto industry out of the lows of the Great Recession.As reported by Reuters on Aug. 4, 2015, the National Automobile Dealer Association projects 2015 auto sales to reach 17.17 million vehicles, a 4.4 percent increase from 2014. Steven Szakaly, an NADA economist cited in the story, predicts that U.S. sales will peak at a record high in 2016 of 17.46 million vehicles and then slide back to 16.65 million vehicles in 2017.Healthy auto sales translate into good times for those in the lending business, according to CU Direct. During an Oct. 8, 2015, webcast for its lending partners–“State of the Credit Union Auto Lending Market”–CU Direct underscored that auto loans have hit the $1 trillion mark in outstanding balances for the first time in the U.S. history. CU Direct also reported that credit unions captured 25 percent of all U.S. auto loan originations in second quarter 2015 and 19.6 percent in June of 2015, up from 18.8 percent at the same time last year. Riding the wave, CU Direct partner credit unions experienced 16.7 percent in loan growth through mid-year.So, how long will this robust auto lending market last? As long as employment continues to improve, interest rates stay relatively low and gasoline prices remain at their current level. continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Tapp steps in to run Miller investments

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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