Iraqi Army Drives Into Future With M1A1 Abrams Tanks

first_img Soldiers with Company C, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Advise and Assist Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, United States Division-Center, worked with Iraqi Army 9th Armored Division soldiers during M1A1 Abrams tank drivers training Jan. 15-16, at Camp Taji, Iraq. “We focus on driving M1A1s to drive Iraq forward into the future and for the betterment of the people of Iraq,” said Iraq Army Jundi Anwar Hakim Khidher Al-Janabi, a tank commander with the 9th Armored Division, out of Camp Taji. All 140 M1A1s that the Government of Iraq has purchased from the U.S. are to be issued to the 9th Armored Division in monthly installments by the end of 2011, following a transitioning process at Contingency Operating Site Hammer, Iraq. The 9th Armored Division tankers will attend a 45-day new equipment operator’s course this spring at the Besmaya Combat Training Center, Iraq. The new equipment operator’s course curriculum will lead Iraqi Army tankers through everything the soldiers need to do as a crewman and crew in order to operate the tank effectively, starting with basic tank safety and ending with crew gunnery exercises,” said Sgt. 1st Class Philemon Jones, a platoon sergeant and master gunner with Company C, 1st Bn., 18th Inf. Regt. Armor crewmen with Company C, 1st Bn., 18th Inf. Regt. are training the Iraqis on individual tasks in preparation for the new equipment operator’s course. “The training will allow them to have a base of information, so [at the new equipment operator’s course] they can concentrate on the crew tasks instead of the individual tasks,” Jones said. The M1A1s will give Iraqis confidence in their equipment, precision in their engagements, pride and a new level of prestige, he said. “[Now] they’re on the same level as other countries and can defend themselves against internal threats as well as external threats,” Jones said. The M1A1s will help the current situation and control terrorist activities, said Jundi Hazim Swadi Jaber, a tank loader with the 9th Armed Division. “We will move forward, ahead of neighboring countries, in our technology. We’ll have an advantage,” Hazim said. “I’m proud, because I’m learning a new tank with technology that will help to fight the terrorists.” By Dialogo February 02, 2011last_img read more

Read More →

Bat Theory Strikes Out

first_imgAn international team of biologists set out to write the family history of bats, a story that is “largely unknown,” they admitted in Science.1  They didn’t have much to go on.  “The fossil record is impoverished,” their research confirmed, so they tried to piece together a phylogenetic story by combining all that is known about bats from molecular genetics, biogeography, and the fossil record.  First, some background about bats from Nancy B. Simmons, who analyzed the research in the same issue of Science.2  They really are quite a remarkable group of mammals:Bats, the only mammals capable of powered flight, constitute more than 20% of living mammal species.  Unlike birds and other terrestrial vertebrates, most bats use echolocation—a biological form of sonar—to locate and track their prey.  Bats are found on every continent except Antarctica, and they exploit a wide variety of food sources including insects, small vertebrates, fruit, nectar, pollen, and even blood.  More than 110 bat species may coexist in some ecological communities, a number that far exceeds that of any other mammalian group.  Despite their prominent position among mammals, the evolutionary history of bats is largely unknown because of a limited fossil record and incomplete phylogenies [circular reasoning].   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)It seems surprising that such a large and diverse group of mammals should be so under-represented by fossils.  The researchers estimate that 61% of the fossil history is missing.  Furthermore, “the evolutionary history of this order has been obscured by controversial phylogenetic hypotheses.”  There are large bats, small bats, Old World bats, New World bats, echolocating bats and non-echolocating bats.  Some theories propose that echolocation arose more than once: unlikely, says Simmons, “Because bat echolocation is a complex system involving specialization of the respiratory system, ear, and brain….”  Their tree requires either that it arose more than once, or some groups had it then lost it.    The group of researchers came up with a family tree all right, but not without problems.  “Our molecular dates suggest that there are large gaps in the fossil record for most bat lineages,” they state.  More importantly, they exploded on the scene without apparent ancestors:On average, the fossil record underestimates the origin of 58 bat lineages by 73% (Fig. 2).  The four major microbat lineages are missing on average 56 to 86% of fossil history, with the Gondwanan clade (noctilionoids) missing the most (Fig. 2).  Megabat lineages are missing a sum total of 98% of their fossil history (table S5).  The terminal and internal branches are missing on average 58 and 88% of fossil history, respectively (table S5).  With well over half of the Cenozoic history missing for microbat lineages and nearly all of the fossil history missing for megabat lineages, it is not surprising that Paleocene bat ancestors having transitional morphological adaptations for flight and echo-location have never been discovered.So how does one put together a family tree with so little data?  The best one can.  Despite the phylogenetic tree drawn for publication, the above statement was the last paragraph in the paper!  Simmons says of this predicament, “The scope of this ‘big bang’ Eocene radiation is unprecedented in mammalian history.”1Teeling et al., “A Molecular Phylogeny for Bats Illuminates Biogeography and the Fossil Record,” Science, Vol 307, Issue 5709, 580-584 , 28 January 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1105113].2Nancy B. Simmons, “An Eocene Big Bang for Bats,” Science, Vol 307, Issue 5709, 527-528 , 28 January 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1108871].For a case study on how to spin-doctor a bad situation, read the UC Riverside press release.  You’d expect lies from National Geographic, of course: “Scientists Fill Blanks on Bat Family Tree.”  They just don’t tell you what they filled it with: imagination.    In debates with evolutionists, creationist Dr. Duane Gish, author of Evolution: The Fossils Say No, often taunted the opponent by showing a picture of the earliest known fossil bat, which was clearly 100% bat.  He would emphasize that there were no transitional forms between a mouse-sized mammal and a flying bat.  Dr. Gish has earned a grin for Science to say the same thing.    Both papers suggest that bats appeared because new food sources arose.  Presumably, a wealth of new insects, fruits, flowers and small mammals was like a shopping mall without customers, so the customers “emerged” somehow to fill all the wonderful new ecological niches.  Maybe this is the “If you build it they will come” theory of evolution.  We think, rather, that if Charlie has been up to bat for 140 years and is still striking out, it’s time to retire.    Bats are exceptional examples of incredible creatures that defy evolution.  Some of their technical feats are illustrated in the Moody Institute of Science classic Dust or Destiny, which shows them navigating through jail bars in total darkness by echo-location.  They can swoop up an insect in their wings during their agile, acrobatic flights, and detect texture, shape and movement with sonar.  Despite their scary appearance, bats are our allies, ridding the air of excess insects.  Bats are among four totally separate groups of animals capable of flight – reptiles (pterosaurs), insects, birds and mammals – each different, yet thoroughly capable from first appearance on earth, just as the Bible creation account says.(Visited 25 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More →

Science Fails Its Ideals

first_imgFraud, lack of integrity and non-reproducible results continue to plague Big Science. Fair debate can help.Scientists strut about, and science teachers and reporters exalt them, because of their alleged superior methods of knowledge acquisition. Students are told that scientific findings are peer reviewed, reproducible, and testable. The reality is different. It’s like finding out your priest is a pervert.High-profile journals put to reproducibility test (Nature). Did you know two out of five published research results are not reproducible? The “reproducibility crisis” that embarrassed Big Science in recent years continues unabated (4 April 2017). We’re talking about the big-name players here:A reproducibility effort has put high-profile journals under the spotlight by trying to replicate a slew of social-science results. In the work, published on 27 August in Nature Human Behaviour, researchers attempted to reproduce 21 social-science results reported in Science and Nature between 2010 and 2015 and were able to reproduce 62% of the findings. That’s about twice the rate achieved by an earlier effort that examined the psychology literature more generally, but the latest result still raises questions about two out of every five papers studied.Let’s ask another question: could this latest test itself be reproduced? Who’s watching the watchers?No more excuses for non-reproducible methods (Nature). In his “World View” column, Lenny Teytelman shares some of the common rationalizations offered for non-reproducibility of research results. But he thinks there are fewer excuses for it now, thanks to the internet. Is a new golden age of trust coming?Now should be springtime for methods sharing. Mobile-friendly, web-based technologies are maturing just as the need to improve reproducibility has gained widespread attention. A new era of more-efficient, more-confident science is ours to lose.What his essay implies is that science has been unacceptably efficient before now, leading to unacceptable levels of public trust and confidence. This may be a jarring realization to people raised on the perception of science as the paragon of trustworthy knowledge.Open up peer review (Nature). The editors of Nature are feeling the heat of challenges to the traditional style of anonymous peer review. In the same issue of Nature, Jessica K. Polka and 4 other scientists, writing”Publish peer reviews,” call “on journals to sign a pledge to make reviewers’ anonymous comments part of the official scientific record.” Also in the same issue of Nature, Jonathan Tennant and two others argue that preprints (postings of scientific papers before peer review) help journalism, not hinder it.In suggesting that preprints could distort the public’s understanding of science, Tom Sheldon perpetuates the fallacy that peer review is a guarantee of validity (Nature 559, 445; 2018). There are countless examples to the contrary (see, for instance, A. Margalida and M. À. Colomer PeerJ 4, e1670; 2016)….Plenty of peer-reviewed research papers contain errors. Preprints provide a chance to spot these and have them removed before publication.The editors respond that “A transparent process to publish referees’ reports could benefit science, but not all researchers want their assessments made available.” So who is right? Nobody. Each solution has problems. Peer review is not a command etched on stone tablets, but an attempt to compensate for human fallibility and laziness. If men were angels, Jefferson said, they would not need government, nor would they need peer review (open or otherwise). This may be another jarring realization to people raised on the perception that peer review confers some kind of imprimatur on truth.How Unpaywall is transforming open science (Nature). Frustrated by the inability to access science papers behind the paywalls of journals, some individual scientists rigged a search algorith, called Unpaywall, that can find free copies online. Molly Else reports that the trend is growing to include Unpaywall in other science databases. This article illustrates how the lack of accessibility to published science hinders one of the ideals of science, which is free and open exchange.Corel Pro PhotosThe sugar wars: Rhetoric or reason? (Medical Express). This article illustrates that some of the things we “think” we know best may rely on shaky evidential ground. Sugar is bad, right? Scientists keep telling us to cut down on carbohydrates, because they cause diabetes and obesity. Along comes a maverick like Edward Archer, PhD, to challenge this assumption.In his article, Edward Archer, Ph.D., of EvolvingFX, Jupiter, FL, USA, challenged the latest dietary recommendations and presented evidence from multiple domains to show that “diet” is a necessary but trivial factor in metabolic health. “Anti-sugar rhetoric is simply diet-centric disease-mongering engendered by physiologic illiteracy,” he wrote. “My position is that dietary sugars are not responsible for obesity or metabolic diseases and that the consumption of simple sugars and sugar-polymers (e.g., starches) up to 75 percent of total daily caloric intake is innocuous in healthy individuals.“Six bullet items of factoids make his case. But before piling on the sugar in your diet, though, notice that his critics don’t take this challenge lying down. In Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, Archer’s claims that started “The Sugar Wars” were met with letters to the editor defending the traditional anti-sugar consensus. Archer remains unflappable. He responds with cogent attacks on the consensus:It is time for the medical and scientific communities to return to their roots, eschew magical and miraculous thinking, and demonstrate a modicum of skepticism by refuting the illiterate nonsense and puritanical proscriptions engendered by diet-centrism.Can a scientific consensus really be that wrong? We’re not taking sides in the Sugar Wars, because it is off-topic for CEH. It should be noted, however, that a long-trusted government study called the Food Pyramid was recently undermined by complaints that it was based on shoddy science. Classrooms across America posted diagrams of the Food Pyramid as if it represented the best advice from empirical science. Jonathan Wells gives another example. He quips in his book Zombie Science that the consensus was on an anti-egg binge years ago, only to reverse itself after making millions of people afraid to eat eggs, which it now says are healthy. How many egg farmers suffered from that detour?In a related article, Medical Xpress says, “Low-carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided.” Weren’t we all told for years that carbohydrates are bad? No look what the European Society for Cardiology says in their ESC Congress 2018:“We found that people who consumed a low carbohydrate diet were at greater risk of premature death. Risks were also increased for individual causes of death including coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. These diets should be avoided.“Another claim reported by Medical Xpress from the ESC Congress claims, “Components of heart healthy diet may differ from what was previously thought.” Thought by whom? Thought by the very food scientists who told us to significantly reduce carbohydrates in our diet.Professor Salim Yusuf, senior author and director of the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, said: “Thinking on what constitutes a high quality diet for a global population needs to be reconsidered. For example, our results show that dairy products and meat are beneficial for heart health and longevity. This differs from current dietary advice.”Recommendations for a high quality diet to avoid cardiovascular disease are largely based on studies conducted decades ago in high income countries. There is little information on what people eat today across the world.And yet coming up with a simple plate of food that would be called “healthy” for everyone from Inuits to Italians seems a daunting challenge. The point is that if scientists cannot come up with reliable guidelines for a subject as simple as what we should eat (a subject amenable to reproducible, testable results), how can they pretend to tell us about non-reproducible events from millions of years ago?One of Archer’s critics “feels it is important to have the scientists discuss opposing viewpoints in the journal.”Debate is supposed to be good for science. There is one topic that a scientist dare not oppose for fear of losing job, tenure, and respect: Darwinian evolution. The Pro-Darwin totalitarian dictators of Big Science are so entrenched, just using the phrase “intelligent design” in a submitted paper will guarantee rejection unless it mocks the phrase. Same for “irreducible complexity” or anything else that “smells” like it came from a Darwin doubter, no matter how good the science behind it. Don’t even think about “creation” or “young earth” getting a fair trial in the court of Big Science peer review.For instance, look how Science Daily gets away with claiming “Study confirms truth behind ‘Darwin’s moth’” as it regurgitates the old peppered moth myth. The article brashly asserts, “Scientists have revisited — and confirmed — one of the most famous textbook examples of evolution in action.” Jonathan Wells, PhD, who has studied the peppered moth story for at least 20 years, could shred this claim to pieces if he were allowed into the debate, but as an ID proponent, he remains hidden behind the sound-proof one-way glass erected by Big Science.The DODO’s don’t want anyone threatening their DOPE-pushing business. The reproducibility crisis shows them to be as naked as their Emperor Charlie.(Visited 439 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More →

Consider storage expenses in marketing

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCI’ve noticed far fewer bad corn crop pictures and farmer complaints this year versus previous years. Most farmers are generally happy with crop conditions. Usually by mid-July at least some farmers are complaining about drought conditions and wondering why corn isn’t at $5. This could be a sign that a huge crop is nearly made or at the very least a very good crop is out there.Some in the trade have focused discussion to ear weight as a reason why prices should increase. They say too much June heat forced corn to grow too fast, which compromised the health of the plant and the weight of the ear. If true, this could have a big impact on yield production. In the past few years though, ear weight ended up being higher than many thought, which caused underestimating national yields prematurely.Still, in 2010 many thought there would be a record production in August, but final national yields were 10 bushels less than what was estimated. There is still a lot of growing season left until harvest and no one knows for sure what final yields will be. Don’t give your storage awayAll too often farmers are too focused on cash prices and don’t pay enough attention to their storage expenses. However, if farmers want bigger premiums and profits, they need to think about grain marketing differently than “conventional” wisdom. This is especially true in years when grain prices are at or under breakeven points. Following illustrates a mistake many farmers make who do NOT have 100% on-farm storage capacity.Many farmers make their first, and maybe only, sale before harvest for December or January delivery to capture some market carry premium while also allowing them to core their bins during the winter. This makes perfect sense for farmers with 100% on-farm storage, but for farmers who don’t have full storage on their farm, it is usually a mistake.For example, in May corn prices for harvest delivery were $4.25 while January delivery was $4.35. This meant there was a 10-cent market carry premium for a farmer to hold their grain after harvest for 2 months (i.e. 5 cents/month). Seeing this premium, some farmers sold some of their corn they were storing at home thinking they were getting a good deal. But now corn is under $3.80, and since these farmers don’t want to sell for that price, they will likely have to pay storage fees at a commercial facility for around 5 cents per month waiting for prices to increase.Put another way, these farmers likely will wipe away all market carry profits from the original trade on grain storage fees waiting for higher prices on stored corn in a commercial facility. If these farmers have to wait for 6 months after harvest looking for a big rally they will be incurring 30 cents in storage fees. In the end these farmers are 20 cents behind. I arrive at that price taking the 10 cents profit on original market carry sale on the stored bushels, less the 30 cent 6 month storage fee on any unpriced grain in commercial storage.Obviously I understand the need to core bins centers in the winter and I appreciate that farmers are trying to secure market carry with January delivery. However, a better idea would be to sell grain for harvest delivery on that first sale and look to make more harvest sales down the road as prices increase. Most end users will allow farmers to move a sale for harvest delivery forward in time if it is discussed a little bit ahead of time with the buyer. Most end users should be willing to pay the farmer a premium to do so. The reason why is because the market is paying a premium to hold grain in storage and it’s harder to buy bushels later on than during the middle of harvest.Many farmers can wait until February or even March to core their bins centers out, this could provide another additional two free months of on-farm storage. This allows for even more time for prices to rally on any unpriced grain, and that doesn’t even take into account the possible basis bump potential. Thus, by waiting, farmers aren’t “giving away any storage.”It’s difficult for farmers without 100% on-farm storage to estimate their storage needs each year. That’s why I suggest hedging with futures. This allows for flexibility in deciding when, where and how much grain to move. Plus it leaves the option open to pick up market carry premium too. Flexibility in your grain marketing strategy and sometimes “going against the grain” will lead to increased profitability. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

Read More →

A Geocaching Return From Space After 75,000,000 Miles

first_img SharePrint RelatedThe First Geocaching First-to-Find in SpaceNovember 18, 2013In “Community”100 Days in Space – International Space Station Travel Bug Mission UpdateFebruary 10, 2014In “Community”Behind the Scenes: My Travel Bug®’s Mission to SpaceOctober 16, 2013In “Community” Rick Mastracchio and the Travel Bug in Space.Finally you’ll be able to post “Welcome Back to Earth” on our Facebook page!After orbiting the Earth nearly 3,000 times over six months (and about 75,000,000 miles), astronaut Rick Mastracchio (Geocacher: AstroRM) and a very popular Travel Bug® will return home from the International Space Station. Thousands of people, at more than 700 Geocaching in Space events around the world, watched as Mastracchio and a Travel Bug rocketed into space.Mastracchio has been living aboard the International Space Station since November of last year. He even geocached in space. He logged a First to Find on the International Space Station geocache placed by fellow geocacher Richard Garriott. He used the Travel Bug to teach students back on Earth about science and geography, interacting with them on the Travel Bug page about everything and anything to do with space.May 13, Mastracchio and the Travel Bug will climb into a capsule and return to Earth. The event will be aired live on NASA TV. Celebrate and remember the epic adventure with the Geocaching in Space patch. And do us a favor, say a very special thanks to geocacher Cizzors for leading the charge for Rick Mastracchio to take the Travel Bug into space.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Read More →

ThisWeKnow: New Semantic Web App Tames Massive Data Sets from Data.gov

first_imgData.gov launched in May this year to make huge data sets of information from federal agencies available in machine-readable formats. While incredibly valuable, these data sets are not particularly useful in their current format to anyone but researchers, statisticians, sociologists, developers, or others used to parsing databases searching for trends.At least for geographically relevant information, ThisWeKnow provides one use case for the data sets. Users can enter the name or ZIP code of any community and get details on all kinds of factors, from violent crime to companies releasing pollutants.Each search for a location will generate a page of “factoids,” as ThisWeKnow calls them. Single sentences that express statistics about the community, these factoids can be clicked for deeper digging, as seen below, or can be shared on Twitter by clicking the “tweet this” links on the page. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#start Developed by a consortium of three different organizations (web app shop and data analysis firm GreenRiver.org, web design studio Sway Design, and semantic web database company Intellidimension), ThisWeKnow is written in Ruby on Rails. It communicates via SPARQL to an RDF database. The source code is available under an MIT license at GitHub. Users can also see the SPARQL query that generated the information on any particular page of the site.Out of the box, ThisWeKnow presents interesting information; however, we are interested to see how the developers proceed to offer more options for sorting, comparing, and visualizing the available data.GreenRiver.org managing director Michael Knapp addressed our desire for more granular data in an email, saying, “The presentation of these data at the town level was somewhat arbitrary – we figured it would be more recognizable to end users than block groups, etc. We needed to combine numerous data sets which present data at very different spatial aggregations, and of the 9 or 10 databases we’ve loaded, only one used coordinate data… Our vision is to have numerous facets into these data, including time (history), issues, etc., in addition to place-based ‘factoids’.”In its first phase of development, the ThisWeKnow team has focused on a handful of spatially focused data sets from six different agencies in the Data.gov catalog. Ultimately, they hope to make the entire Data.gov catalog available to the public and give developers an API to access the data, as well. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting jolie odell 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Read More →

After Effects Fundamentals Lesson 1: Welcome to AE

first_imgLearn the basics of After Effects in Lesson 1 of our 10 part After Effects Fundamentals course.For the new user, Adobe After Effects can seem like the most fun, mind-blowing, and complicated program ever created. AE gives users the ability to blend motion graphics with VFX and everything in-between. It has been used to create VFX on the biggest Hollywood films including Avatar and the Avengers, and it’s the go-to industry standard for motion graphic design. But for new users After Effects can be incredibly daunting. If you’re not familiar with terms like masks, keyframes, alpha-channels and rendering, navigating After Effects may seem impossible.Well lucky for you, we’re offering a free video tutorial series on After Effects Fundamentals. The 10 part course will be presented over the course of 10 weeks, with a new lesson posted every Monday until we are finished with the series. By the end of the series you should be ready to create amazing animations and VFX in After Effects. If you have any questions along the way I’ll be happy to answer them. Simply ask in the comments below.In this first lesson we will introduce you to the After Effects workflow and go over a few key concepts including:The After Effects interfaceEffectsSolids and layersAnimationRenderingWith a little determination you’ll be creating amazing animations in no time.Best viewed full screen:We will post new lessons every Monday for the next 10 weeks. Check the Premiumbeat blog for future lessons. And while you’re there you can watch more After Effects tutorials, read the latest filmmaking news and pick up some post-production tricks.What did you think of the first lesson? Have any questions? Ask in the comments below.last_img read more

Read More →

Video Tutorial: A Brief Guide to the Warp Stabilizer

first_imgIn this video tutorial, we go over how (and when) you can use the Warp Stabilizer effect in Adobe Premiere Pro to smooth out shaky footage.Top image via Cocos.Bounty.Shaky footage is almost inevitable once you go handheld. Without a manual stabilizer (like a tripod, a gimbal, or a glide cam), your footage falls victim to walking, running, wind, and other elements — or just regular ol’ shaky hands. Many filmmakers still rely on handheld capture because it’s quick, intimate, and usually cheap. So how do they deal with shaky footage?A quick antidote for shaky footage is the Warp Stabilizer effect in Adobe Premiere Pro. The effect smooths out jittery footage with just a few clicks. It can’t fix everything – don’t expect to smooth out handheld clips you shot while running for a chase scene — but it can even out smaller shakes and jitters, like those that occur while you’re standing still or walking slowly. There aren’t many options for doctoring shaky footage in post, but the Warp Stabilizer just might be able to save your project.We made this quick video to walk you through a few situations when the warp stabilizer can help out. You’ll see the effect at work on shaky static shots, which is a good way to demonstrate its capabilities.So, how does the effects actually work? Well, according to Adobe,You can stabilize motion with the Warp Stabilizer effect. It removes jitter caused by camera movement, making it possible to transform shaky, handheld footage into steady, smooth shots.Now, within the effect, there are more ways you can control how it functions with the clip you’re adjusting. (All the specifics about how the effect will work or how you can alter it are available here.) Like any effect in Premiere, you’ll need to play around with the Effects Controls to figure out what your video needs.For another fantastic example of how Warp Stabilizer works (and when you can or should use it), check out this video by the always-trustworthy Sam and Niko.So, the Warp Stabilizer isn’t a perfect substitute for the art of smooth camera movement, but the tool can save you under the right circumstances. For more coverage of stabilization techniques, check out some of our other articles.Find Out Why You Should Stop Using a Gimbal On Every Shoot8 Ways You Can Save a Shot in Post-ProductionYou Can Pull Off These 4 Amazing Camera Shots with Zero GearCrafting Exposition That Won’t Bore Your AudienceGrip Tricks: Do-It-Yourself Camera Rigslast_img read more

Read More →

The US Is Twice As Likely To Win The World Cup As

“Time heals all wounds” is kind of a nonsense saying when it comes to sports. If it were true, rivalries wouldn’t exist and 35-year-olds on the brink of retirement wouldn’t hang on for one last World Cup. More than half the likely starters on the U.S. and Japanese national teams in the Women’s World Cup final this Sunday were there for the agony and ecstacy — depending which team you were on — of the 2011 final game, when Japan defeated the U.S. on penalty kicks. Japan now has a chance to repeat history, and join Germany and the U.S. as the only countries to win two World Cup titles. The U.S. is looking to break its 16-year World Cup drought and secure its place in history as the greatest World Cup dynasty of all time (in either the women’s or men’s game).This championship game might not be the greatest of all time, but it’s one with a lot of still-fresh wounds, so here’s a look at how it’s shaping up.Things are more even than they seemBack in 2011, some betting lines put Japan’s chances of beating the U.S. around 28 percent, not so far from where they are this time around. Coming off a huge semifinal win over Germany, FiveThirtyEight’s model says the Americans should win 67 percent of the time, but the two teams’ performances in this World Cup have been pretty similar. Both teams have created the same number of chances (59) and scored the same number of goals (nine), despite having traveled very different paths to the final.It’s likely that goals won’t come easily for either side. The U.S. hasn’t been scored on since its opening game, and Japan has conceded only three goals in six games (one of which was an egregious keeper error). It may very well come down to who can capitalize on the few good opportunities the defense allows, and which team doesn’t miss early chances like the U.S. did in the 2011 final.A battle of two very different stylesJapan is arguably the most technical team in the world; it has had the highest pass completion percentage of any team at the World Cup (80 percent compared to the Americans’ 74 percent) and its players have touched the ball and attempted almost 1.5 times as many passes as the U.S. players. Japan plays a quick, one-and-two-touch style of soccer that is different from the styles of most teams the U.S. has faced so far. The closest comparison is probably Colombia — and the U.S. struggled a bit to win the ball back in the midfield in that game.Where the U.S. will excel against Japan is with its physicality and speed; by pressuring the defense and surprising Japan by playing the ball in behind. This is how the first U.S. goal came at the 2011 World Cup: The midfield collapsed to win the ball back, Megan Rapinoe played a long ball in behind, and Alex Morgan outran her defender and scored with just two touches. In the semifinal game against England this year, Japan struggled when the Lionesses pressured and stepped to win the ball back, and the U.S. must do the same thing if it hopes to break down Japan’s tremendous organization. The Americans are undoubtedly faster and stronger than Japan, but they’ll also need to be able to win the ball from a team that hardly loses it.Slow and steady wins the race (at least for one team)Both teams’ chances of winning didn’t change significantly throughout the tournament aside from a bump after the semifinal games; the U.S. hovered around 30 percent and Japan around 10 percent for the majority of the World Cup. Neither team looked stellar during the group stage — eyes were on Germany, France and even Brazil’s early dominance — but these are the two teams that have made it to the World Cup final.“These are two talented teams with a lot of history and rivalry, and I think it will be a classic matchup,” U.S. coach Jill Ellis said about Sunday’s final. The score in head-to-head matchups is one to one right now — one World cup victory for Japan to one Olympic gold medal for the U.S. — but everyone knows a World Cup trophy tastes sweeter than gold. read more

Read More →

TCI NON PROFITS MUST REGISTER

first_img DR wants consulate office in TCI Related Items:governor peter beckingham, legislation, Non Profit Organizations Regulation, patrick pauline, register Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 25 Nov 2014 – Legislation delayed by one year is now live; the Non Profit Organizations Regulation 2014 has been Gazetted and calls for all not for profit entities to register; which means they now become supervised by the Financial Services Commission. This legislative change was strongly resisted by NPOs, but now the move is forward as the law requires groups like Crime Stoppers, the Turks and Caicos Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the Red Cross, the Turks and Caicos Hotel and Tourism Association, the Heart Foundation and others that fall into this category to not only state who they are, name executives, directors or trustees but to report on the monies being made, how they are being made and to show what the funds are being used to do. Greater transparency and accountability some might call it; for the Turks and Caicos as a UK overseas territory it is a part of the mandate to line up with global expectations about financial transactions within the territory. Ironically, as these organizations were seeking to have more time to brace themselves for this added expense and administrative procedure and hoping for the legislation to be tweaked; a Canadian attorney operating in the Turks and Caicos: Patrick Poulin was arrested in an undercover operation by US agents. Poulin and two others were accused of using a non-profit organization in the Turks and Caicos to launder money; $2 million dollars. Poulin, 41, who worked at Bishops here in Provo, entered a guilty plea and was sentenced to 14 months in prison and three years of supervised released in a Virginia courtroom last month, according to records from the US DOJ, aka the Department of Justice. All NPOs in the TCI are required to register, with an exemption going only to groups making less than $10,000 annually, who have less than $20,000 in assets and are with a certificate of exemption. On November 13th HE Peter Beckingham, the Governor signed this revised legislation into law; the three objectives being for non-profits to register, to maintain records and to annually report on finances of up to half a million dollars. There are fines for breaching the ordinance; they range from $30,000 to $50,000. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you More motor mishaps; PDM Leader calls for Govt attention to illegal jitneys, again New Prison Supt & Officer of the Year Awardedlast_img read more

Read More →