French rulers tell youth: ‘Act your age and shut up!’

first_imgParis, FranceAfter government employees, joined by railway workers and students, demonstrated here on May 22, police arrested nearly 100 young people, including minors as young as 14. The protesting youths were occupying the Arago High School (lycée) in Paris.Before being taken into custody, some 60 of them were packed like cattle in a police van for more than four hours. They were not allowed to notify their relatives, drink or use the toilet. These arrests, which lasted for two days, were traumatic for the adolescents and distressing for their families.After that ordeal, several of these young people, handcuffed as if they were dire threats to society, went before a judge.What crime had these young rebels committed? They had decided — and had the courage — to oppose the neoliberal “reform” of the education sector that French President Emmanuel Macron wants to impose. They had done no damage other than break one window.One of them said: “I was shocked by the brutality of the police and the conditions of detention. They wanted to make us an example to stop young people from mobilizing, but I will continue to organize even more.”For months, left-wing student unions have been asserting their refusal to see education turned into a commodity. While the French educational system has been predominantly public and higher education courses have been almost free of charge until recently, tuition fees have been increasing. Until a recent change in the law, university admission was guaranteed to everyone who passed the baccalaureate [a test given at the end of high school].The students say no to the fact that more and more young people from poor families are barred by lack of money from studying and are condemned to unemployment. Many teachers are also mobilizing. All are calling for more resources for education, which the government-imposed austerity is suffocating.Whatever you think of President Macron, whatever adjective you apply to a government that acts like this, a regime that attacks its youth by acting so badly is obviously losing control of itself as well as of the situation. Not a day goes by in France without the government’s repression of social anger.Should we get used to seeing the CRS [specialized police units for suppressing crowds] invade university campuses, which are boiling with indignation, and bludgeon resisting students? Must we passively sit by as an authoritarian hierarchy at the ministerial level overturns the decisions of teacher assemblies and administrative personnel in struggle? If we do that, we might as well give up the little democratic space that capitalist society concedes!Again and again, the only thing tolerated is the comedy of bourgeois democracy — with its own limitations however. In the Odeon Theater in Paris (famous for having been occupied by students during the May 1968 general strike), a show took place on May 7 to commemorate the events of 50 years ago.Everything went according to plan … until the true (today’s!) students suddenly burst into the auditorium and took the initiative to speak up and explain to the audience the reasons for their ongoing protests. The theater management panicked and called the police, who, in an unpopular move, used force to make the young “troublemakers” leave the theater.Something is going wrong in the kingdom of Macron. Perhaps that something is a people that refuses the fate he plans for them. A people who are slowly becoming aware that the dismantling of public utilities is not progress, that the “reforms” promoted by the media on behalf of big finance are entirely destructive. A people who are painfully learning how to get back on their feet to walk again.All this will take time. But it is clear that many of us will no longer go along with his plans.Minister of the Interior Gérard Collomb has no doubt understood this. He announced on May 27: “If we want to keep the right to demonstrate tomorrow, which is a fundamental right, people who wish to express their opinion must also oppose the ‘breakers.’ They cannot by their passivity allow themselves to become accomplices to what is happening [the resulting harm].”He must consider it a beautiful social project to make the right to demonstrate in France conditional on transforming all the “ordinary demonstrators,” as he calls them, into police officers!Herrera is a Marxist economist, a researcher at the Centre National Recherche Scientifique, who works at the Centre d’Économie de la Sorbonne, Paris. WW staff translated this article.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Castletroy Park Opticians celebrate ten years in business

first_imgWhatsApp Twitter Facebook Margaret Greaney (Optical Receptionist), Daniel Casey (Owner/Practice Optometrist), Susan Hill (Practice Optometrist), Aoife Lynch (3rd Year Student Optometry), Trina O’Sullivan (Shop and Lab Manager)CASTLETROY Park Opticians are making  ten years in business by extending a special thank you to customers and patients for their continuing support, particularly in such challenging times.Owned by optometrist Daniel Casey, the locally owned business is situated in the Castletroy Retail Centre beside the local Bank of Ireland branch with free parking available for customers.Reflecting on the gradual easing of Covid restrictions, Mr Casey said, “We are delighted to be able to continue to provide an Optometry service to all our patients  and look forward to do so well into the future.“Susan Hill is our Senior Optometrist and between us we have over 40 years experience in optics. We both have a special interest in new innovations in contact and spectacle lenses regarding myopia (short sightedness) control and management of VDU-related eye issues.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “Trina is our shop and lab manager with over 15 years experience in optics while Margaret our optical receptionist has been with us over three years. Aoife is a third year Optometry student and has been with us for over two years.“If qualified eye examinations and a selected range of glasses are covered by medical cards or PRSI entitlements and we can provide this service with a full eye exam costing €30,” Mr Casey added.Opening hours are Monday to Friday from 9.30am to 5.30pm and on Saturdays from 10am to 4pm.#LimerickPost #KeepingLimerickPosted #sc Email Previous article#ThrowbackThursday: This week’s look back at our Out & About photosNext articleA new talent acquisition solution from Optima Recruitment Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.iecenter_img Linkedin Print BusinessNewsCastletroy Park Opticians celebrate ten years in businessBy Staff Reporter – May 20, 2021 190 Advertisementlast_img read more

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Nappanee man, 20, arrested for Lapaz man’s murder

first_img Pinterest Nappanee man, 20, arrested for Lapaz man’s murder Google+ Facebook Google+ Twitter IndianaLocalNews WhatsApp (Photo supplied/Elkhart County Jail) A Nappanee man has been arrested, suspected of the murder of a Lapaz man back in June.Thomas Campion, 45, was found shot to death at Meadows Mobile Home Park in Nappanee.Another man was hurt, but survived.Aidan Burkins, 20, is being held without bond in connection with the death, as well as attempted murder, criminal recklessness with a deadly weapon and possession of marijuana charges. Facebook Pinterest By Jon Zimney – September 4, 2020 0 417 Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleLaPorte man arrested, accused of sexual molestation, possession of child pornNext articleMan recovering after shooting outside Lowe’s in Goshen Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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How America went astray

first_imgThe following is excerpted from the new book “Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope” by Nicholas D. Kristof ’82 and Sheryl WuDunn MBA ’86.  Kristof and WuDunn will be appearing on Jan. 27 at the Back Bay Events Center, 180 Berkeley St., Boston.Kevin Green struggled economically for years. He died at home, age 54, in January 2015, after suffering from diabetes, urinary issues, and liver and heart problems. So much had changed since high school when he was a sleek cross-country runner with a shining future.Shortly after mourning Kevin, our mutual friend Rick “Ricochet” Goff himself was dying after a lifetime of drink, drugs, and negligible health care. Ricochet was smart but had been expelled from school in eighth grade (as punishment for truancy!) and never recovered.Mary Mayor, Nick’s seventh-grade crush, a sweet, raven-haired girl who was the daughter of the county trapper, also had gone off the rails. Mary was smart, hard working and resourceful: When her parents moved away after her junior year of high school, she wanted to graduate with her friends, so she got a job at the Yamhill Café, rented a room, and finished school on her own. But soon after graduation she was swamped by the wave of joblessness, despair, alcohol, and drugs sweeping the area. She spent seven years homeless, once putting a gun in her mouth to end it all. Her sister and three other relatives had already killed themselves. Just as she was about to squeeze the trigger, she thought of her daughter and paused; she decided to soldier on. Finally, with the help of a local church, Mary was able to start over. She is now sober and drug-free, making a living selling her own handcrafted birdhouses, though she still suffers pancreatitis from her drinking years.Kevin, Ricochet, and Mary were good, capable, caring people who found themselves swamped by larger economic changes — and then that brokenness was passed to the next generation, with their children struggling with their own demons of addiction, unemployment, or incarceration. Yes, people made bad choices. In each case, the bad decisions were a symptom of larger economic malaise. In white America, the impact was focused on those who came of age in the late 1970s or afterward. Irene Green, Kevin’s widowed mom, had lost Thomas Jr., Cindy, and Kevin but was herself going strong physically and mentally at age 80. Her own mother had died recently at 97. The younger generations of Greens were far more troubled, and you could see the declining well-being of working-class America — and a visualization of America’s declining life expectancy — each time you looked around the Green dinner table. What we saw was a tragedy not just for one family, for the country cannot achieve its potential when so many citizens are not reaching theirs.,This is not an exclusively liberal or conservative issue. Conservative writers like Charles Murray and David Brooks have explored these chasms, with Brooks arguing that “the central problem of our time is the stagnation of middle-class wages, the disintegration of working-class communities and the ensuing fragmentation of American society.” On the left, Senator Elizabeth Warren and many other Democrats have made similar arguments. Remarkably, this pain in white working-class America helped account for the rise of both Donald Trump on the right and Bernie Sanders on the left.What went wrong?For much of the 19th and 20th centuries, the United States had pioneered efforts to create opportunity. The Homestead Acts, beginning in 1862, were a self-help program that gave American families 160 acres of land each if they farmed it productively or improved it over five years. Homesteads transformed the West, and one-quarter of Americans can trace some of their family wealth to that visionary initiative. Another historic program was rural electrification, which beginning in 1936 brought electricity (and later telephone service) to farmers across America, transforming rural life, improving productivity and multiplying opportunity.The United States was one of the first countries nations to offer near universal basic education, and then one of the first to introduce high schools for nearly all children. “By the early 20th century America educated its youth to a far greater extent than did most, if not every, European country,” Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz write in “The Race Between Education and Technology,” their exploration of how investments in human capital made America the world’s leading country. A state university and community college system made tertiary education widespread, and the GI Bill of Rights vastly expanded educational attainment and homeownership in America.There were many other historic initiatives in the early 20th century that put the United States on a progressive path. In the 1930s, Congress approved social safety net programs like Social Security, unemployment insurance and jobs initiatives like the Civilian Conservation Corps. Other countries later adopted many elements of these programs.Then in about 1970, America went off track, beginning a nearly half-century drift in the wrong direction. High-school graduation rates tumbled from the highest to among the lowest in the industrialized world. Incarceration rose sevenfold. Family structure collapsed. Single-parent households soared. Life expectancy peaked. Working-class incomes grew glacially, if at all. And today the top 1 percent owns twice as great a share of national wealth as the entire bottom 90 percent. We went from being a world leader in opportunity to being a laggard.The decline in education leadership is particularly significant, because good jobs increasingly require a solid educational foundation. Globalization, automation, and a relentless focus on cost cutting led to a hollowing out of urban blue-collar and clerical jobs that in the past were often performed by people with limited education. David Autor, an economist at MIT, has found that as a result, urban workers with only a high-school education fill jobs that are actually lower skilled now than back in the 1970s.,One reason Kevin Green floundered was that he hadn’t graduated from high school. That hadn’t been an impediment for earlier generations of blue-collar workers, including his dad, for in the early 1970s some 72 percent of American jobs required only a high-school education or less. By 2020, that will have fallen to 36 percent. One consequence is a plunge in earnings for those with limited education. In the 1970s, a male high-school graduate earned on average almost four-fifths as much as a male college graduate, but that has fallen to just over 50 percent. And those like Kevin who didn’t graduate from high school do even worse.In 1970, tax revenue made up about the same share of gross national product in the United States as the average in the OECD, the club of industrialized nations. It then inched up in every other rich country, as one might expect when populations age and need more public services, while remaining unchanged in the United States. So people in other wealthy countries today pay about an extra 10 cents on the dollar in taxes, but in exchange get health insurance, better infrastructure, less poverty, reduced homelessness and, we’d argue, a healthier society.One sign that the United States was moving rightward and following a different trajectory than the rest of the West was the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980. Reagan both reflected and shaped the country’s mood in the 1970s when in his speeches he regularly denounced a Chicago welfare recipient: “She has eighty names, thirty addresses, twelve Social Security cards and is collecting veteran’s benefits on four nonexistent deceased husbands.” After his election to the presidency, he famously declared in his inaugural address in 1981, “Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.” He broke the air traffic controllers’ union; worker protections declined; and the business world became much more powerful.As hostility toward government spread in America, there have been determined efforts to cut taxes, particularly for the wealthy, and then “starve the beast” — using reduced revenue to justify cuts in services for the disadvantaged. This is both disingenuous and cruel, as well as out of step with the advanced world. Other countries over the decades expanded health-care coverage, adopted family-leave policies, extended mass transit and implemented child allowances to reduce poverty, while the United States bucked the trend by slashing taxes, cutting back hours at public libraries, raising tuition at state universities, and allowing infrastructure to decay. Grover Norquist, an influential Republican advocate for lower tax rates, captured the small government ideology: “My goal is to cut government in half in 25 years, to get it down to the size where we can drown it in the bathtub.”Why did the United States drift so far rightward in a way other countries mostly did not? We wonder if one reason wasn’t national anxiety about race, violence, and unrest beginning in the mid-1960s. This was the time of assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, and Martin Luther King Jr., of political riots in Chicago, of race riots in Los Angeles, Newark, Detroit, and other cities, of domestic terrorists like the Weathermen, of talk of revolution, of hippies and yuppies, of furious debates in households across America. Repeated psychology experiments have shown that fear makes us more conservative in our political beliefs, and Richard Nixon seized upon the fears in 1968 when he ran for president with coded dog whistles playing on white apprehensions of black unrest.This “southern strategy” turned the South into a GOP bastion, and the fearmongering has often extended into social policies as well. Welfare was portrayed as handouts to lazy blacks, and immigration as a threat to American culture and jobs. The lack of social-support policies then led to a certain despair and disintegration of traditional communities, amplifying fears that traditional values were being lost and pushing states that once had progressive streaks, like Iowa and Oklahoma, firmly into the Republican camp.Another factor was the inflation of the 1970s and the recognition that American business had grown too complacent, so that the economy really did need a kick in the pants. European and Japanese corporations were gaining ground, and some union rules did suppress innovation and labor-saving efficiencies. There were legitimate grounds for deregulation and also a genuine need for new industries like venture capital and private equity that forced efficiencies in the bloated private sector. But we then went too far in unleashing unfettered capitalism. As the business writer Steven Pearlstein put it: “What began as a useful corrective has, 25 years later, become a morally corrupting and self-defeating economic dogma that threatens the future of American capitalism. Our current prosperity is not sustainable because it is not producing the kind of society that most of us desire.”In 1965, the average chief executive earned about 20 times as much as the average worker; now the average CEO earns more than 300 times as much. A Walmart employee earning the median salary at the company, $19,177, would have to work for 1,188 years to earn as much as the chief executive did in 2018 alone. Companies also changed the ways they operated, outsourcing custodial jobs and eliminating pensions in ways that raised share prices but left many families more vulnerable. Arkansas in 2018 became the first state to impose work requirements for Medicaid. It also required participants to log their work hours online with an email address and a code sent by mail. Unfortunately, Arkansas ranks 48th among states in internet access … Oren Cass, a former management consultant at Bain & Company who was domestic policy director for Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign, understands the arguments for business efficiencies. He notes that the erosion of the old labor market resulted in strong overall economic growth and cheap products. But the trade-off was not worth it, he adds. In his book “The Once and Future Worker,” he cautions, “What we have been left with is a society teetering atop eroded foundations, lacking structural integrity, and heading toward collapse.”Whereas government historically had helped struggling Americans with measures like the GI Bill of Rights, it retreated just as disappearing jobs, proliferating drug use and disintegrating families increased the need for social services. The churches, schools, and community organizations could not respond adequately when faced with these dark new forces, so government officials instinctively lashed back with mass incarceration that only compounded the problems.It’s puzzling that many politicians fear that poor people are trying to milk the system, while they don’t seem to fear rich people doing the same with far more dollars at stake. The latest fashion for smacking the downtrodden among some lawmakers: work requirements to receive benefits such as Medicaid. Arkansas in 2018 became the first state to impose work requirements for Medicaid. It also required participants to log their work hours online with an email address and a code sent by mail. Unfortunately, Arkansas ranks 48th among states in internet access, and many Medicaid recipients have no email or internet. Of the first group subjected to the requirement, 72 percent could not comply. So families lost health insurance, and then some people were unable to get medication and, their sicknesses flaring, lost jobs. Meanwhile, from 2007 to 2016, the state granted subsidies of $156 million to corporations, including HP and Caterpillar, under an “economic development” program that researchers found had almost no correlation to increased employment.In the past half century America has failed particularly in creating inclusive growth. Poor parts of the country had been catching up with the rich parts for much of the 20th century. Mississippi went from 30 percent of the per capita income in Massachusetts in the 1930s to almost 70 percent by 1975, and similar trends were apparent in other southern states. But that trend slowed and then reversed, so that Mississippi is now down to 55 percent of the Massachusetts per capita income. The reasons seem to be in part self-inflicted. There has been a growing premium in the labor market for educated workers, but Mississippi and other southern states have underinvested in education. The South’s strategy was to cut taxes, believing low taxes would attract businesses and boost growth, but this was not terribly effective in the age of the knowledge economy. High-paying, high-technology companies require a pool of educated workers, so they often end up investing in high-tax, high-education states like California, Massachusetts, and New York. This is amplified when right-wing politicians in the South defend Confederate statues or demonize gays or transgender people, and the result is further economic backwardness and frustration. And the cycle repeats. Not since the Great Depression has America experienced the kind of working-class stagnation that we’ve seen in recent decades, and it has fed polarization, racism, and bigotry, gnawing away at our social fabric. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.center_img Not since the Great Depression has America experienced the kind of working-class stagnation that we’ve seen in recent decades, and it has fed polarization, racism, and bigotry, gnawing away at our social fabric. Resentment has grown toward Latinos, Muslims, and African Americans. White supremacists gained ground, and on websites and social media Americans glibly trumpet their bigotry. Hate crimes have increased in the United States for three years in a row, the FBI reported. On one ultra-right website we visited, people posted venomous statements about Muslims and called for mass deportation. One woman proposed, “Any Muslim man wanting to come into our country must be castrated first.”Is this America?The white working class has genuine grievances. It has greatly suffered from rising inequality, from a minimum wage falling in real terms and from inattention by Washington politicians. Perhaps as a result, this demographic is also extremely distrustful of politicians and political solutions — 93 percent say they have an unfavorable view of politicians.“This creates a dilemma for Democrats,” the economist Isabel Sawhill notes in her book “The Forgotten Americans.” “Any activist agenda risks driving even more of the working class into the Republican camp, especially if that agenda relies on Washington-led policy making and new taxes.” So far, these voters have doubled down on politicians who want to move the United States farther away from the trend in the Western world.President Donald Trump’s election in 2016 was a manifestation of that trend. Trump did extremely well in areas with high death rates for whites aged 40 to 64. Many of these working-class voters had supported Presidents Obama and Clinton but now switched sides and backed Trump. “People felt ignored,” Republican pollster Frank Luntz told us. “And Donald Trump spoke to them.” Once in office, of course, Trump chipped away at the Affordable Care Act, so that fewer Americans were insured than would otherwise have been the case. Less insurance in turn means more die from heart disease, cervical cancer, and liver ailments, and fewer have access to addiction treatment, a tragic wrong for his working-class supporters.In Oklahoma, we met a kindergarten teacher named Rhonda McCracken who fervently supports the local domestic violence intervention center, which she said helped her escape a brutal ex-husband who beat and choked her. Staff at the domestic violence center helped McCracken escape that relationship and start over.“They saved my life, and my son’s,” she told us, her eyes liquid.So how does McCracken vote? “I voted for President Trump,” she told us, noting that she is a Republican, and it seemed natural to support him. Soon after taking office, Trump attempted to cut funds that finance the domestic violence center, and McCracken was aghast. “My prayer is that Congress will step in” to protect domestic violence programs, she told us. Yet she did not regret her vote for Trump, and she was generally sympathetic with his desire to cut spending. She said she might support his reelection.Because many readers are likely to find the support for the GOP unfathomable in places that are hurting so badly, we asked our Yamhill friend and neighbor Dave Peper to explain his politics. Dave has endured tough times — including seven episodes of homelessness — but is a firm supporter of Trump. One reason is that he’s a believer in gun rights and carries a loaded handgun on his hip at all times. But Dave says that he’s also fed up with paying taxes to support social programs that, as he sees it, go to support deadbeats who don’t want to work.“I think we need welfare reform like you can’t believe,” he said. “I believe there’s a ton of people out there milking this system to death. I’m sick and tired of paying for it. I really am. My taxes tend to go up, but my road never gets fixed.” As examples of people milking the system, he cites people in the area who don’t seem much interested in working hard but get food stamps or disability.For all his strong support for Trump, Dave acknowledged being troubled by the polarization and nastiness of politics today. “I don’t know what the solution is,” he added, “but I just pray every night for my country and my home.” Dave reflected local sentiments. In Yamhill in 2016, Trump captured 57 percent of the vote, and Hillary Clinton 32 percent (most of the rest went to Gary Johnson, the libertarian candidate). As went Yamhill, so went much of white, working-class America.“Tightrope” authors Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn are the first husband and wife to share a Pulitzer Prize for journalism.Working-class voters are not uniformly conservative in their views. Polls show that they favor higher taxes on the rich, paid family leave, and a higher minimum wage. But the working poor are disdainful of government benefits, even though they sometimes rely on them, partly because they often see firsthand how neighbors abuse those benefits; there’s far more anger at perceived welfare abuses than at larger subsidies for private jets. The resentment is more visceral when it is people around them who are bending rules and benefiting unfairly.Rev. Rhonda Kroeker in Yamhill shares some of that concern, and she, too, is sympathetic to Trump. “People just want a more simple life,” she told us. “They want America to be great again. The way it was when we were kids.” Pressed on what that simple life would look like, she thought for a moment and answered, “Just the America we grew up in. I was proud to be an American girl. Families were important. It was important to go to school. It was important to have a job. Try and do the right thing for your family. I don’t know. Maybe they see that in Trump.”We believe that nostalgia is widespread. We also argue that this supposed golden era had a dark side: In the early 1960s, before the wave of changes in America, women had few opportunities; African Americans lived under Jim Crow laws; and family planning was banned in most states for unmarried women. As recently as 1987, only half of Americans said that it was always wrong for a man to beat his wife with a belt or stick. A 1963 poll found that 59 percent of Americans believed that black-white marriages should be illegal, and interracial marriage was still banned in 16 states as recently as 1967, when the Supreme Court overturned such laws in the case of Loving v. Virginia.Yet it’s true that there were indeed elements of that era that were important and that have been lost. Inequality was lower, and working-class families enjoyed huge gains in education, incomes, standard of living. Families had their problems, but children were far more likely to be raised in intact, robust two-parent households, and there was very little homelessness. One simple gauge of well-being: suicide rates were much lower than today. Few of our friends understood the plight of those struggling more viscerally than Mary Mayor, Nick’s old friend who had spent years homeless and once put a gun in her mouth. So we asked Mary if she supported politicians who would take a different course to fix America. Yes, she said, although she acknowledged that she wasn’t terribly interested in politics and had never actually voted until 2016. “It was just too complex,” she told us. “And I got confused with this or that.” But finally, she said, she voted for change because the stakes were so high. Casting a ballot for the first time in her life, she voted for Donald Trump.“Trump is our only hope,” Mary told us. “The man’s dirty, you know? But he’s still plugging forward.” She said she wished that Trump would get off Twitter, but added that the economy was doing better, with more jobs available. The media are unfair to Trump, she said, while giving Democrats a pass.In the middle of a series of Trump scandals, we asked Mary how she thought Trump was doing so far. She paused thoughtfully and said firmly, “He’s done a good job.”“He believes in the American people,” she added. “I feel great to call myself an American once again.”Copyright 2019 by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn. Excerpted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher. last_img read more

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Naked Teen Triple Murder Suspect Arrested After Trying to Flee Police

first_imgThere’s always a Florida connection: Matthew Bernard is a Virginia man accused of killing his mother, sister and 1-year-old nephew at his home in rural Pittsylvania County, authorities say. He was apprehended running around naked outside. The victims include 24-year-old Emily Bernard Bivens and Cullen Bivens, the wife and son of Tampa Bay Rays pitching prospect Blake Bivens. Bernard’s 62-year-old mother, Joan Bernard, was also killed. The 19-year-old Bernard was taken into custody by police while running naked through Keeling, Virginia, hours after the murders. He has since been booked into a local jail, authorities said.vmargineanu/iStock(KEELING, Va.) — A teenage suspect in a triple murder in Virginia was taken into custody after fleeing from authorities while naked.Matthew Bernard, 18, of Keeling, Virginia, was arrested on three counts of first-degree murder on Tuesday afternoon, according to the Pittsylvania County Sheriff’s Office. He is believed to have shot and killed three relatives at a home in Keeling, an unincorporated area near Virginia’s southern border with North Carolina.While responding to a 911 call about someone being shot on Tuesday morning, deputies found the body of one of the victims, a woman, in the driveway of the residence, while the two other victims — a child and a second woman — were found dead inside the home, the sheriff’s office said.The bodies were taken to the Roanoke office of Virginia’s medical examiner for autopsies to determine the cause and manner of death. The victims’ names will be released once family members have been notified, according to the sheriff’s office.Danville Community College in Danville, Virginia, was under lock-down Tuesday as a “precautionary” measure after Bernard, who was a student there, was identified as the suspect at-large in the slayings, according to the Danville Police Department. He was said to be armed and dangerous.ABC affiliate WSET-TV of Lynchburg, Virginia, was in a media staging area at the scene in Keeling that afternoon when suddenly Bernard, who wasn’t wearing any clothes, ran out from a nearby wooded area and attacked a church groundskeeper then took off again. Authorities chased Bernard down the street and were able to apprehend the teen, who was taken to a local hospital for treatment, according to WSET.The investigation is ongoing, and Bernard’s first court appearance has not yet been scheduled, according to the sheriff’s office. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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McKay mines hard-fought gold

first_imgHEAVYWEIGHT Jason McKay and US Open Night of Champions winner, Ackeem Lawrence, won gold and bronze, respectively, at Saturday’s Colorado Taekwondo Championships in Denver, United States.The Jamaicans had expected two medals from the lightweight division, envisioning a final between Lawrence and compatriot Delano Francis.However, Francis first bowed out as multiple rounds at high altitude in the Colorado mountains proved too tough for the youngster from sea-level Portmore, Jamaica.Lawrence used his superior conditioning and experience to reach the semis but fell out of favour with the judges due to excessive contact, ending his run with a bronze medal.This left McKay as Jamaica’s sole hope of winning what had become an unlikely gold medal after the masters division was cut and all heavyweights herded into one division.”It was hell out there. The altitude really had me suffering. I lost my legs midway the division and had to turn the rounds into boxing bouts. However, I think I was really lucky with the draw and that pulled me through,” he said.”It was a good tournament. I think the rounds and altitude took a toll on Delano. Ackeem was just unlucky with the contact rules,” McKay added.last_img read more

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QPR’s Warren Farm plan ‘back on’ and Barton clarifies Arsenal comments

first_imgTony Fernandes has tweeted that QPR’s plan for a new training ground at Warren Farm is “back on” following a meeting with the leader of Ealing Council.Delays to the project and the expected cost mean Rangers have been looking into extending their current training base at Harlington instead.But club chairman Fernandes declared: “Super meeting with council leader Julian bell of Ealing. Super leader .so passionate. Warren Farm back on. Super exciting . great leader.”Super meeting with council leader Julian bell of Ealing. Super leader .so passionate. Warren Farm back on. Super exciting . great leader.— Tony Fernandes (@tonyfernandes) October 4, 2014Earlier this week Fernandes also tweeted about Rangers’ proposals for Old Oak.The club’s owners want to win the right to regenerate the area between Scrubs Lane and Willesden Junction, which would become known as New Queens Park and include a stadium for Rangers.“Just passing old oak common on the Heathrow express having returned form dubai. what an amazing project we could do for the community,” chairman Fernandes wrote.“Everyone can win. Its takes courage ,determination, putting people first and sharing the spoils for a better west london. Full stop.”Meanwhile, Rangers midfielder Joey Barton has been in the news for criticising Arsenal on Twitter.Barton has since tweeted: “What I said about Arsenal taken out of context. I believe the current side lack spine and character when compared to the Invincibles team.“The current side are a very good side but their record against other top clubs in league games recently is very poor.“Now whether thats tactics, mental strength, discipline, I’m not sure. All I do know is results say their coming up short.”See also:Legal victory for QPR in Warren Farm battleFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Did you miss the Raiders on ‘Hard Knocks’? Watch the premiere here

first_imgThe Raiders made their “Hard Knocks” debut Tuesday night in a premiere episode that highlighted rookie defensive back Johnathan Abram’s pronunciation of “salmon,” and plenty more.Derek Carr played some in-home hoops with his sons, Antonio Brown ran routes on his frostbitten feet and Jon Gruden used colorful language to describe how he wants his players to ruin each others’ dreams of making the NFL.Related Articles Raiders Straight Talk: Derek Carr speculation won’t stop any …last_img read more

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Essential guide to scuba diving in South Africa

first_imgIf it’s variety you’re after, you’ve come to the right place. South Africa has an enormously long coastline ranging from about 35°S to 27°S, which isn’t quite within the usual range for tropical diving.(Image: Pixabay)Brand South Africa reporterBut the Mozambique Current flows down our east coast, bringing warm tropical water with it, and at Sodwana Bay we have the most southerly coral reefs in the world.As you head down the coast the underwater environment changes gradually until, once you reach Cape Town, you’re diving in chilly but beautiful kelp forests. There are three major types of kelp, and a short portion of the Western Cape coast is the only place in the world that they all grow together.Click for: Scuba diving operators by provinceIf you’ve always shunned cold water diving, consider it. Sure, you have to don a thick wetsuit with constraining hoodie and gloves, but it’s worth it. Diving in kelp is like walking in a forest – you float beneath the canopy and admire the surprisingly colourful reef life.Off Cape Town, divers regularly see anemones in colours ranging from electric blue or deep red to pale pink, nudibranchs of almost every colour you can imagine, and a range of small creatures in and around the bright orange and sulphur yellow sponges.There are dive schools in almost every centre, with a surprising number in landlocked Johannesburg, where people do their training before heading down to Sodwana Bay for their qualifying dives.There is even an inland dive resort near Johannesburg, where students can do their first dive or two in a disused quarry. Komati Springs is a much deeper disused quarry in Mpumalanga province, where rebreather, mixed gas and deep diving courses are run.Take careful note of your no-fly limits, however. A flight from sea level to Johannesburg can take only an hour, but you gain about 2 000 metres (7 000 feet) in altitude – that’s without even considering the flight.This represents a major risk, so adjust your itinerary to include a day of sightseeing, shopping or beach lounging between diving and travelling to Johannesburg.Source: Dive Style websiteWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Consider storage expenses in marketing

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCI’ve noticed far fewer bad corn crop pictures and farmer complaints this year versus previous years. Most farmers are generally happy with crop conditions. Usually by mid-July at least some farmers are complaining about drought conditions and wondering why corn isn’t at $5. This could be a sign that a huge crop is nearly made or at the very least a very good crop is out there.Some in the trade have focused discussion to ear weight as a reason why prices should increase. They say too much June heat forced corn to grow too fast, which compromised the health of the plant and the weight of the ear. If true, this could have a big impact on yield production. In the past few years though, ear weight ended up being higher than many thought, which caused underestimating national yields prematurely.Still, in 2010 many thought there would be a record production in August, but final national yields were 10 bushels less than what was estimated. There is still a lot of growing season left until harvest and no one knows for sure what final yields will be. Don’t give your storage awayAll too often farmers are too focused on cash prices and don’t pay enough attention to their storage expenses. However, if farmers want bigger premiums and profits, they need to think about grain marketing differently than “conventional” wisdom. This is especially true in years when grain prices are at or under breakeven points. Following illustrates a mistake many farmers make who do NOT have 100% on-farm storage capacity.Many farmers make their first, and maybe only, sale before harvest for December or January delivery to capture some market carry premium while also allowing them to core their bins during the winter. This makes perfect sense for farmers with 100% on-farm storage, but for farmers who don’t have full storage on their farm, it is usually a mistake.For example, in May corn prices for harvest delivery were $4.25 while January delivery was $4.35. This meant there was a 10-cent market carry premium for a farmer to hold their grain after harvest for 2 months (i.e. 5 cents/month). Seeing this premium, some farmers sold some of their corn they were storing at home thinking they were getting a good deal. But now corn is under $3.80, and since these farmers don’t want to sell for that price, they will likely have to pay storage fees at a commercial facility for around 5 cents per month waiting for prices to increase.Put another way, these farmers likely will wipe away all market carry profits from the original trade on grain storage fees waiting for higher prices on stored corn in a commercial facility. If these farmers have to wait for 6 months after harvest looking for a big rally they will be incurring 30 cents in storage fees. In the end these farmers are 20 cents behind. I arrive at that price taking the 10 cents profit on original market carry sale on the stored bushels, less the 30 cent 6 month storage fee on any unpriced grain in commercial storage.Obviously I understand the need to core bins centers in the winter and I appreciate that farmers are trying to secure market carry with January delivery. However, a better idea would be to sell grain for harvest delivery on that first sale and look to make more harvest sales down the road as prices increase. Most end users will allow farmers to move a sale for harvest delivery forward in time if it is discussed a little bit ahead of time with the buyer. Most end users should be willing to pay the farmer a premium to do so. The reason why is because the market is paying a premium to hold grain in storage and it’s harder to buy bushels later on than during the middle of harvest.Many farmers can wait until February or even March to core their bins centers out, this could provide another additional two free months of on-farm storage. This allows for even more time for prices to rally on any unpriced grain, and that doesn’t even take into account the possible basis bump potential. Thus, by waiting, farmers aren’t “giving away any storage.”It’s difficult for farmers without 100% on-farm storage to estimate their storage needs each year. That’s why I suggest hedging with futures. This allows for flexibility in deciding when, where and how much grain to move. Plus it leaves the option open to pick up market carry premium too. Flexibility in your grain marketing strategy and sometimes “going against the grain” will lead to increased profitability. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

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