Meet Your New Fave Broadway Couple: Jarrod Spector & Kelli Barrett

first_img View Comments Q: WHY WERE YOU ON NON-DATES?JARROD: We met doing a reading of Piece of My Heart in 2010. We both were with other people at the time, so nothing was going to happen, of course. We met in April and then in December of that same year [2010], we did another reading, and that was the end of that. I just was in love with her.KELLI: I had no idea how he felt at all. We became good friends. Before we ended up together, we were texting every day and playing Words with Friends and threatening each other’s lives.JARROD: Like you do.Q: THREATENING EACH OTHER’S LIVES? KELLI: You know—kind of pulling each other’s pigtails.JARROD: Right. When you can’t reference the sexual tension, you just threaten one another’s lives. One day we were texting, and I was like, “I’m going to go take a nap.” And she wrote, “Fine. Sleep forever.” I thought that was the funniest thing ever. In retrospect, it was really kind of creepy. Q. DID YOU HAVE AN AHA MOMENT?KELLI: I was folding laundry in my apartment in Astoria and we were chatting on the phone. He said, “You know you’re the Sally to my Harry, right?” The phone dropped, and I had that moment where I was like, “Oh my God, is that what this is?”Q. DID YOU DO A LOT OF VOTING IN BROADWAY.COM’S SEXIEST MAN ALIVE POLL?KELLI: You want to know something funny? When I voted, I accidentally clicked on [Spector’s former Beautiful co-star] Jake Epstein. He was like, “Did you just click on Jake?!”JARROD: The most basic of computer polls is beyond your grasp.Q. HOW DOES IT FEEL TO WATCH EACH OTHER GET ROMANTIC ON STAGE WITH A CO-STAR?JARROD: It’s not always the easiest thing in the world. I think we’re doing as well as human beings can be expected to do. And it does come with the territory.KELLI: We’ve said to each other—as hard as that conversation would be—if we start to feel something for a co-star, we have to tell each other and not get all offended by it and jealous. It was in our vows, actually.JARROD: Kelli’s vows were very specific about co-stars. Q. WHAT’S YOUR DREAM SHOW TO DO TOGETHER?KELLI: Gosh, that’s really hard. Parade would be unbelievable.JARROD: Kelli has done two readings of Anastasia with two different leading men, but to play opposite one another as Anastasia and Dmitri would absolutely be a dream. And my ancestors are Russian, so, you know, type casting.center_img Q. WHAT DOES IT FEEL LIKE TO WATCH EACH OTHER ON STAGE?KELLI: It feels like my child is performing in a strange way. I know that sounds weird. That’s the closest I can get to understanding what it would be like to be a mother.JARROD: Minus the incest.KELLI: I have a huge talent crush on him.JARROD: As my parents say, I kvell when I watch her. A typical night in for Broadway couple Jarrod Spector and Kelli Barrett might include a game of Carcassonne, a marathon of House of Cards or a feast of celery and peanut butter. But nights in are few and far between for the busy newlyweds: Tony nominee Spector stars as the hypochondriacal Barry Mann in Beautiful, while Barrett is gearing up to open in the new musical Doctor Zhivago, in which she plays Lara Guishar, Zhivago’s paramour. The couple (feel free to call them Sparrett) invited Broadway.com into their stunning Harlem apartment—festooned with remote-control flameless candles—and then grossed us out by being utterly gorgeous, finishing each other’s sentences, cracking everyone up and just being disgustingly perfect in a way that makes you want to be best friends with them forever. Vomit, you guys. (Also, call us! We want to play Carcassonne with you!)Q. WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST DATE?JARROD: It wasn’t a date. We were still not dating. We had a series of unofficial dates, but we went to see Sleep No More on one of our first nights out.KELLI: We were friends!JARROD: We went to Sleep No More and ended up at the Westway Diner until 4:30 in the morning. You know, like friends do.KELLI: Not dating.JARROD: Not at all.last_img read more

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Peru Stands Out in Pacific Partnership Humanitarian Mission

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo May 29, 2019 Two elements of the Peruvian Armed Forces made their capabilities available to the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet for multinational exercise Pacific Partnership 2019. The annual humanitarian crisis response exercise was conducted between March 1 and June 1 in the Indo-Pacific region. Peruvian Navy Lieutenant Omar Vicente García, head of Risks and Disasters Rapid Intervention Company of the Engineering and Infantry Battalion, and Lieutenant John Gamarra Bravo, a physician specialized in urology, were the only military representatives from Latin America. More than 500 service members from Australia, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, Peru, the Philippines, South Korea, Thailand, The United Kingdom, and the United States joined efforts for the three-month mission. The objective of the exercise is to improve interoperability and disaster response capabilities in the Indo-Pacific region. The mission also seeks to provide humanitarian support to the countries visited — in this occasion, the Federated States of Micronesia, Malaysia, the Marshall Islands, the Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste, and Vietnam — and contribute to stability and security in the region. “During the stops, teams from various areas of expertise build on each other’s experience to shape capability, capacity, and understanding for disaster preparation and response,” U.S. Navy Captain Randy Van Rossum, Pacific Partnership 2019 mission commander, told Diálogo. “If we understand each other, then we can be more effective when disasters hit.” Providing support For the mission, the Pacific Fleet deployed the expeditionary transport vessels USNS Fall River (T-EPF 4) and USNS Brunswick (T-EPF 6) from Naval Base Guam, in the U.S. territory in the western Pacific. Upon arriving on the island, the Peruvian officers, who each boarded a ship, were trained in humanitarian assistance, attack prevention, and countering human trafficking. They also learned about operational rules and safety criteria. At each stop, the officers met with host nations’ counterparts and personnel from government security agencies and nongovernmental organizations. Mission members provided disaster response and health seminars, as well as disaster preparedness training. They also took part in various projects based on each country’s needs, such as renovating schools and installing drinking water and filter systems, among other activities. “[In Peru] I’ve taken part in civic actions, medical and dental health campaigns, and illness prevention [activities] in remote areas. Now we have the capability to resolve problems with the minimum required,” Lt. Gamarra told Diálogo while on board the USNS Brunswick. “Working with health professionals of the U.S. Navy is amazing, because of their response capability in case of problems such as tropical diseases.” Participants also conducted field exercises to review interoperability capabilities. For example, in Tacloban, in the Philippines, service members faced a simulated magnitude 8.5 earthquake, and conducted a medical evacuation exercise as part of a simulated mass casualty drill in Kuching, Malaysia. “This work is very helpful for Peru,” Lt. Vicente, on board the USNS Fall River, told Diálogo. “By seeing how the other countries carry out their work, I will be able to give the [Peruvian] Navy a report on how we could improve, because the country has similar problems.” Capt. Van Rossum stressed the importance of multinational missions, such as Pacific Partnership, to reinforce regional cooperation. The exercise also strengthened bonds of friendship between participating forces. “Each country has different experiences with natural disasters, which brings a variety of capabilities,” said Capt. Van Rossum. “It’s important for our partner nations, such as Peru, to be directly involved in the specific lines of effort during Pacific Partnership 2019. We are fortunate to have two Peruvian officers who are a part of two different lines of effort, medical and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.” Stronger together The December 2004 earthquake and tsunami that hit Indonesia and killed more than 200,000 people led to the creation of exercise Pacific Partnership in 2006. In its 14th edition, the exercise evolved from a mission to provide direct care to an operation focused on enhancing partnerships. The several participating nations, which, upon an invitation from the Pacific Fleet share their experiences and knowledge, contribute to mission success. “Having Latin American partner nations to learn the best practices and share experiences in different fields of disaster preparedness and response helps increase cooperation,” Capt. Van Rossum concluded. “We are stronger when we work together.”last_img read more

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Facebook broadens reach: eyes publishing and banking industries

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Georgann SmithFacebook recently unveiled “Instant Articles,” a program that hosts publishers’ content in the Facebook app’s News Feed. This essentially amounts to Facebook preloading articles, making them available immediately. Spokespeople have said the change is to eliminate slow load times experienced by articles shared on Facebook.In a recent blog post, my colleague Brian Day, TMG director of digital payments strategy, discussed Facebook’s expansion into payments with Messenger Pay. The social media giant has experience in payments, as it processes more than 1 million payments daily through ads and games platforms. The network has also experimented with e-commerce in the past, through the use of a “buy” button for purchasing items directly on its site. Instant Articles are further proof of Facebook’s continued extension beyond being a social network for people to connect.Easing publishers’ fears that Facebook would keep all the data generated by the Instant Articles, the social network said it will share analytics. Publishers’ ads can appear inside Instant Articles, with publishers keeping 100 percent of revenue if they sell them, and Facebook keeping its standard 30 percent if it sells them. continue reading »last_img read more

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Why credit unions should be more like camels

first_imgI was recently listening to a TED Talks podcast while working out about the discovery of fossil bones in the Arctic Circle. (Am I getting old or what? I used to listen to AC/DC when I worked out; now I’m listening to educational podcasts!) But the discovery of these bones by paleo-biologist made me think of our credit union clients.First, the rest of the story about the discovery: the fossils that were found were identified as the leg bone of a large cloven-hoofed mammal and they were 3.5 million years old. After 4+ years of research and digging, it was determined that this discovery was the tibia of a dromedary. That’s right, a camel in the frigid cold of the Arctic Circle less than ten degrees from the North Pole. How could that be?Now here’s how it relates to your credit union:Think about the incredible evolution of that animal over the past 3.5 million years and its unbelievable migration from the northern and coldest part of Earth to some of the warmest -the Sahara Desert and eastern Asia.The camel had to re-use its cloven hooves from gaining traction in snow to gaining traction in sand. It had to reuse its famous hump as a fat-storage resource that helped it survive a barren cold climate to survive a barren hot climate. It had to change the shedding of its fur to progress from keeping it warm to assisting it remain cool.How has your credit union evolved over the past ten years, never mind 3.5 million years? Have you learned to re-imagine and retrofit the resources that you have at your disposal like the camel did?Many credit unions I see are still deploying staff the same way they did in the past, even though they need different and better talent today. Many are still conducting strategic planning the same way they always have and it doesn’t produce the new, better strategies they crave. Many are leading the same way they have in the past when younger generations of staff are more productive in different cultures and environments.Those scientists believe the camel they discovered was much bigger and looked dramatically different than the camels we know and love today. I’m not suggesting your credit union needs to make similarly dramatic changes. However, being willing and able to redeploy your “hooves”, “humps”, and “fur” could make the difference in your credit union evolving into a thriving species in future generations or falling to the grips of extinction.Also, think about how the scientist had to totally change their perspective on their discovery before accepting the fact that they had found a camel at the North Pole. They looked at data the same way they always had only to be frustrated with the lack of answers. It was only after trying a new process for assessing and interpreting that data that they came to their profound conclusion.How does your credit union process your data? How do you assess the facts that make up your organization? What new perspectives have you gained on your strengths and weaknesses over the past two or three years that might lead you to profoundly different outcomes?Many credit unions I know still deploy staff the same way they did in the past even though their delivery channels are changing radically. Many are looking at their membership through the same “one size fits all” model even though their current and potential members can be easily segmented into clearly disparate dynamics. Many are still adhering to stale, old processes that contradict members’ desire for convenience, speed, and ease-of-use.As new competitors enter our industry (some with far more robust resources than your credit union) we need to look at every aspect of our business from a new and fresh perspective. Steve Jobs instilled in Apple the concept of “Think Different” when they design a new product or launch a campaign. Richard Branson has engaged new teams at Virgin called “Disruptors” to challenge the manner in which they conduct all business activities. What has your credit union done to break the cycle of redundancy and sameness?To begin your process of evolution, like the camel, here are a few ideas:See your business through new lenses. Ask new members about their experience with you and their feelings about your brand. Do the same with non-members, whenever possible. New employees are also good resources for this information. Talk to other business and community leaders what they think about how you do business and how you compare to other financial service providers.Share that data with your staff. Brainstorm ways to be better. Don’t just rely on the same group of decision-makers (i.e., Senior Management) but get ideas from all employees – frontline, back office, middle-managers, facilities workers, everyone has a voice. It’s amazing how insightful your staff can be … if you just ask them!Challenge the current mindset. Assess all your operations and processes. Find out what works and what doesn’t. Try to be 50% better in everything that you do. Look at speed and accuracy. Consider quantity as well as quality. A combination of incremental improvements can make you 50% better overall so no improvement is insignificant.Keep the ball rolling. Once you start this “discovery” process, keep it going. Make it a part of the fabric of your organization. Track and report your improvement. Recognize and even reward successes. Don’t stop looking differently at your data or finding ways to better use your resources.Imagine if those scientists near the North Pole continued to look at their discovery through the same old lenses. They would’ve been limited to considering only those species known to exist in the frozen north tundra. Also imagine if the camel had not evolved and begun using its resources in new and different ways. It would’ve fallen to the fate of many of its brethren over the past 3.5 million years.Just as evolutionary biology is a dynamic field, so should the industry of financial services be dynamic. The successful scientists don’t remain static with their assumptions; they evolve and look at their discoveries in new and fresh ways. They reframe what they thought they knew based on current and different data.If your credit union becomes dynamic, adjusts to new discoveries, and reimagines your business model, like the camel, it too can stave off extinction and thrive in a new and different environment. After all, we’re all just one discovered tibia away from looking at our world in a whole new way.If your credit union needs to embark on a dynamic new evolutionary process, my firm would be happy to assist with your scientific discovery. Learn more at www.fi-strategies.com or contact me at [email protected] or 636-578-3280. 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Robert Paul Robert has been helping financial institutions drive their retail growth strategies for over 20 years. Paul is the Chief Executive Officer for FI Strategies, LLC, a private consulting company … Web: fi-strategies.com Detailslast_img read more

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3 behaviors to stop

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr At all levels of our organizations – from the executive suite down – we’re feeling immense levels of stress. We’ve been working harder over the past six months to meet changing member/customer needs, pivot to more virtual offerings, and run as efficiently as possible.In times of crisis, the sense of ownership and wanting to make sure the final product is perfect can take leaders and managers down the path to micromanagement. But this isn’t good for you – especially if your workload has increased – or your team who are capable of handling their responsibilities.Leadership guru Dan Rockwell has a new post reminding overworked leaders and managers to stop these bad behaviors:Stop doing people’s work for them. An employee comes to you with a question. How often do you step in to take care of it rather than offer guidance? If it’s a task or problem you’ve handled a million times before, you might think it’s easier and timesaving for you to just do it. But, even though you can handle it, your employee will likely feel defeated and lose ambition to tackle similar problems in the future. Fight the urge to do it yourself and give the employee an opportunity to grow. The lessons your teammate will learn while working through it will make them – and your organization – stronger. continue reading »last_img read more

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Open Door Mission tackles food insecurity during pandemic

first_img“You can support any of our causes and we understand during this time it’s tough to ask for money– but it would be a great help,” Root said. Sobol says while some of the food is donated, much of it is purchased from the Food Bank of the Southern Tier, so the center relies on sales and donations from their thrift stores to keep providing those meals. “During a pandemic or not there’s still families that need food, people who need services, just because there’s something like that going on we can’t shut down,” says Dustin Root who works at the mission. Executive Director Mary Sobol says this is nothing new. “We’ve been here for over fifty years. We have four sober living residences for men, and we have three food pantries,” she says. “We thought that would help them prepare better meals,” she says. “They would eat and use more of the food that they provided and their families would be happier eating meals that they themselves choose to eat.” She says part of that strategy is letting families and individuals gather food from the pantry for themselves once a month, rather than just handing out food. The mission operates food pantries in Owego, Waverly and Lounsberry as well as sober living residents for men who are in recovery. center_img OWEGO (WBNG) — The Open Door Mission in Owego is going above and beyond to make sure everyone has a healthy meal on their table during the coronavirus crisis. If you’d like to help out the mission with anything from food to infrastructure projects to keep the center running, you can do so by clicking here. “People donate items to us and then we sell them at our store locations, that money goes to support our sober living houses and our food pantries,” she says. “Everything here should be healthy for them, and that’s what we try to do, give them the option of a healthy diet when their income doesn’t allow it,” she says. From Owego to Waverly, Patti Sheldon is in charge of making sure that food gets to those who need it. Like most shops, the thrift stores had to shut down at the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis and the center relied on money from The Tioga County Foundations Coalition Emergency Fund. Now that the stores are back open, they say if you’re looking to clean out your closet or just to do some thrifting, you’ll be helping out those in need. last_img read more

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E coli in Topps beef traced to Canadian firm

first_imgOct 29, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The source of Escherichia coli O157:H7 that recently spurred a massive recall of ground beef by Topps Meat Co. probably was contaminated beef trim from a Canadian firm, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently announced. Among the new federal safety measures for ground beef, the USDA is requiring more testing of domestic and imported ground beef components and will notify countries that export beef to the United States about new policies and programs to control the pathogen. The company that supplied Topps, based in Elizabeth, N.J., with the contaminated beef was Ranchers Beef, Ltd., based near Calgary, Alta. The firm ceased operations on Aug 15, but the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) obtained and tested some of the company’s product that had been in storage and then notified US officials of its E coli O157:H7 findings. In related developments, New Jersey officials announced recently that its inspectors were able to buy boxes of the recalled Topps beef at a retail store 4 weeks after the product was recalled, according to an Oct 25 report from the Associated Press. Oct 9 CIDRAP News story “Spike in E coli–related beef recalls alarms officials” See also: On the three days when the company was known to have produced contaminated batches of beef, it was grinding both domestic and foreign trimmings, the Times reported. Federal investigators at the Topps plant found that the company had reduced its microbial testing on finished ground beef from once a month to three times a year, according to an Oct 23 report in the New York Times. The company also had failed to require adequate testing on beef from its domestic suppliers, and, like other producers, had increased its purchases of meat from overseas, where testing is not always required, the Times report said. The Topps recall was the largest of several recalls related to E coli in ground beef this year. On Oct 23 the FSIS introduced a number of regulatory measures designed to reduce E coli contamination in ground beef. The FSIS said it had delisted Ranchers Beef on Oct 20, meaning none of the company’s products have been eligible for import since that date. The agency announced that it was placing a hold on Ranchers beef, along other products made from Ranchers beef, until the USDA and CFIA complete their investigation. DNA fingerprinting has linked the strain of E coli O157:H7 found in trim from the Canadian company to an E coli outbreak involving 40 illnesses in eight US states and 45 illnesses and one death in five Canadian provinces, according to an Oct 26 press release from the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). E coli in samples from the Canadian company also matched the strain that health officials in New York found in intact and opened packages of Topps ground beef from the homes of patients. Oct 26 FSIS press releasehttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/NR_102607_01/index.asp A notice on the Ranchers Beef Web site said the company’s plant was for sale. On Sep 25, Topps said it was going out of business immediately because it could not handle the economic burden of recalling 21.7 million pounds of ground beef. “We appreciate the assistance from our food safety partners in Canada. This piece of information helped us to determine a likely source of contaminated product, which led to the Sep 29 Topps Meat Company expanded recall,” Richard Raymond, USDA under secretary for food safety, said in the press release. Oct 23 CIDRAP News story “USDA announces plans to reduce E coli contamination in ground beef”last_img read more

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Koeman focused on crucial period

first_img Tottenham and Liverpool are the only traditional powers they have come up against and represent Koeman’s only defeats in all competitions. That will change over the next nine games, though, with Sunday’s match against City followed quickly by, amongst others, a double-header with Arsenal and home fixtures against Manchester United and Chelsea. “I think if we would like to do better than last season, this period is important because we played nine games until January 1 and that’s difficult, a difficult programme,” Koeman said. “Everybody knows there isn’t an easy game in the Premier League and you have to be prepared every game. “We know if we like to do something special this season then we have to win these kind of games that we have to play.” Key to a positive result on Sunday will be shackling in-form City striker Sergio Aguero. Fresh from single-handedly helping City to a 3-2 comeback win against Bayern Munich, the 26-year-old is sure to give the Saints back line their biggest test yet. “I think that the best player to compare to Aguero is Romario,” former Barcelona defender Koeman said. “I played with him but sometimes you think he is sleeping and in one split second he is scoring. That’s a big quality because that means a lot of concentration for the defender. “He’s always fast, he’s always on the shoulder of the last defender and that’s his best quality.” One of those to play alongside Romario and Koeman in that impressive Barca outfit of the 1990s will be sat in the stands on Sunday. Txiki Begiristain was an important member of the Blaugrana for many years and is City’s director of football after holding that role at the Nou Camp for a number of years. “I have good contact with him still,” Koeman said. “We had a great time together in Barcelona. “I saw him two weeks ago at a League Managers Association meeting about the work of Manuel Pellegrini and we had time to speak to each other about the past and about the future. “We will see each other this Sunday and we look forward because these kind of games for us are the best to play.” That form has led to much discussion as to whether Saints can actually see off the traditional giants and qualify for the Champions League – a feat Koeman believes could become more realistic over the coming weeks. “We try to play game by game and prepare ourselves in the best way for every game,” the Dutchman said ahead of City’s visit. “We know our possibilities but we have played 12 games now and I didn’t see one team better than us in these 12 games and we played against Liverpool and Tottenham. Maybe Sunday but we will see. “(Man City) will take this game very seriously. They know that we are strong. “It’s one of the qualities is the organisation in the team and if you don’t have that organisation it’s not possible to concede only six goals in 12 games. “They know, for sure, they have to be good to win against us and the challenge for us is to beat a good team in the Premier League. “We have the supporters at our back and that will be important for Sunday.” While most onlookers have been taken aback by the manner in which Saints have started the campaign, the doubters will point to the level of opposition as a caveat to that success. Press Association Ronald Koeman believes “something special” can be achieved at Southampton this season if they can prove their mettle in the coming weeks, starting this weekend against Manchester City. An unparalleled talent drain in the summer led to much doom and gloom around St Mary’s, yet the response has been nothing short of astonishing. Koeman’s side are second in the Premier League after their best-ever start to a top-flight season and boast the tightest defence in English football. last_img read more

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Wisconsin comes through in clutch

first_imgFreshman pitcher Meghan McIntosh got the complete-game win in game two Wednesday, throwing a career-high seven innings.[/media-credit]Overcoming two late-inning deficits Wednesday, the Wisconsin softball team swept North Dakota in a doubleheader at Goodman Diamond.The first game took an extra inning to decide after the Badgers tied the game in the sixth inning.With Whitney Massey at third and Kendall Grimm at the plate with one out, Grimm slapped a ball to the shortstop.It was a playable ball that would have held the runner and put out Grimm, but the ball took a short hop and bounced past the North Dakota shortstop and trickled into left field, allowing the walk off run to be scored.That would be just the first come-from-behind win of the day.The second game was very close until the Badgers blew it open in the sixth. With two runners on and one out, Rasmussen came to the plate. She had ripped a ball to right field earlier in the game but was thrown out trying to stretch it from a double to a triple.This time, there would be no need to work for extra bases as she hit a line drive home run to left field. It was the first career home run for Rasmussen, a Madison native, and her team loved the hit as much as she did.“That was awesome,” Senior Katie Soderberg said. “I’m so proud of her. Madison girl, home field, home run, big moment. Couldn’t be more happy for her.”Rasmussen another key play for the team, though this one was on defense.In the fifth inning, North Dakota had runners on second and third. Cami Bennett hit a slow bouncer to Whitney Massey, who quickly threw home for a play at the plate.Although the runner seemed to have beaten the throw, Rasmussen did an excellent job of blocking the plate, and the runner was tagged out. UND associate head coach, Randy Ward, was then ejected from the game for arguing with the umpire.Senior Katie Soderberg came up big as well, scoring two runs in each game, continuing her hot streak as the leadoff hitter for the Badgers. Soderberg said she has loved her time at the top of the line up and is just enjoying her last few games with the team.“You know, it’s my home turf, and I’m a senior; I’m just going out there and having fun now,” she said. “It’s awesome. I’m taking every moment in, and you just leave it on the field.”Soderberg legged out two triples in the second game, which turned into the Badgers’ first and last runs of the day.The senior’s last run capped a four-run sixth inning that sealed the game for the Badgers, though freshman pitcher Meghan McIntosh did have to work herself out of a slight jam in the seventh.McIntosh threw the ball the best she has all year, allowing two earned runs on seven hits, while walking two and striking out five. She did so against a powerful North Dakota offense that includes Casie Hanson, who has an on-base percentage of .507.“I didn’t know that,” McIntosh said of the strength of the opposing hitters. “I just go after them.”“I went to my fastball instead of my curve ball because it wasn’t really moving, so that was an adjustment I made.”Wisconsin’s senior starter, Letty Olivarez, went eight strong innings in game one, allowing only three runs and eight hits. Not surprisingly, strong pitching and timely hitting were the keys to the Badger wins.“They were definitely on, and I always appreciate when our pitchers come out with their ‘A’ game,” Soderberg said.The team had only one clean inning in the second game, sending 29 batters to the plate in only six innings, so players were really hitting behind one another.“Instead of getting one hit and then not getting any hits behind them, we got a whole bunch of hits, and we scored the runners,” Grimm said.In the end, the team was proud of their scrappy and determined play today.“You can always win big games with big numbers,” Grimm said. “But when you come back from a game when we’re down by one run, and we come back and we win that shows that we can come through in any game against any team so we just have to fight.”last_img read more

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Loyal Dodgers fans thrilled to be at postseason game

first_imgChris Sanchez, 46, of Thousand Oaks and his wife, Lynn, said they’ve been fans their whole lives and would never miss a playoff. While it was initially a rough season for the Dodgers, Sanchez said, things really turned around with outfielder Yasiel “Puig hitting as well as he has and the energy he’s put to the team.”The couple said they brought their “good luck charm” to the game, their 12-year-old son, Derek, who donned a long, fake beard with a blue rubber band at the tip in honor of Dodgers relief pitcher and “bigger than life” personality Brian Wilson and a T-shirt that says “Fear the Beard.”“We never leave home without him,” Sanchez said.“It’s his Halloween costume,” said his mother, Lynn, who grew up in Woodland Hills.Dodgers fan Christian Allen, 24, of Manhattan Beach was stuck without a ticket Sunday night but sat down and watched the game on television from outside the Top of the Game Store near the stadium’s entry gate.Dressed in a Dodgers Jersey and cap and holding a baseball mitt and baseball once signed by Dodgers pitcher Ricky Nolasco, Allen was enthusiastically cheering, or in some cases, yelling with frustration after each big play.“It’s better than nothing,” Allen, who is studying sports journalism and photography at El Camino College in Torrance, said, adding that he’d love to see the Dodgers win the World Series this year. “If I’m here, not inside the ballgame, at least let me see the game from somewhere.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Dodgers fans were ecstatic to return to their iconic stadium Sunday for a postseason game for the first time since 2009 and were feeling cautiously optimistic that the World Series was in their future.The sold-out stadium was an electric sea of blue and white as fans in Dodger’s caps and jerseys twirled their rally towels and chanted “Let’s Go Dodgers, Let’s Go!” Many fans were hopeful the team would clinch the win Sunday and again Monday in the best-of-five series against Atlanta so they could celebrate at home. The Dodgers didn’t disappoint them on Sunday with a convincing victory over the Braves to take a two games to one lead and pull within one win of advancing to the National League championship series against either St. Louis or Pittsburgh.“I love the Dodgers; love watching them play,” said Mike Kametani, 68, of Alhambra, who has been a fan for about 20 years and attended the game donning a Hawaiian-style Dodgers shirt given to him by his son 15 years ago for Father’s Day. “The new ownership makes it really nice. A lot of the changes at the stadium have been nice, too. It’s the most exciting team I’ve seen in the last five years. It’s brought baseball back into L.A., really.”center_img Kametani’s sister-in-law Lupe Hilario-Flores, 57, of Pico Rivera grew up going to Dodger’s games since her grandparents were “die-hard” Dodgers fans.While “it’s been pins and needles sometimes,” Hilario-Flores said, “we knew something was going to happen, something good, because of the fact that we’re all happy with the new ownership. We knew with Magic Johnson behind this team, it was going to turn around. Because Magic Johnson is a winner.”Tony Kim, 17, of Brea, said he’s been a Dodgers fan since he was born in Australia, where he and his father would watch the games on Pay Extra before they moved to Southern California.With all the injuries the team has seen this year and they way they were playing early on, Kim said he thought it was “a miracle” they even made it to the playoffs. But early Sunday evening, he was feeling confident, he said, that his team would win and that they would even go on to the World Series.“I’ve been at Dodgers Stadium 10 times and whenever I’ve been here, we’ve won them all so I’m 10-0,” said Kim, who was wearing a Jersey bearing the name of starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu on it. “So I’m confident that we’re going to win tonight.”last_img read more

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