Northern Hemisphere forcing of climatic cycles in Antarctica over the past 360,000 years

first_imgThe Milankovitch theory of climate change proposes that glacial–interglacial cycles are driven by changes in summer insolation at high northern latitudes. The timing of climate change in the Southern Hemisphere at glacial–interglacial transitions (which are known as terminations) relative to variations in summer insolation in the Northern Hemisphere is an important test of this hypothesis. So far, it has only been possible to apply this test to the most recent termination because the dating uncertainty associated with older terminations is too large to allow phase relationships to be determined. Here we present a new chronology of Antarctic climate change over the past 360,000 years that is based on the ratio of oxygen to nitrogen molecules in air trapped in the Dome Fuji and Vostok ice cores. This ratio is a proxy for local summer insolation, and thus allows the chronology to be constructed by orbital tuning without the need to assume a lag between a climate record and an orbital parameter. The accuracy of the chronology allows us to examine the phase relationships between climate records from the ice cores and changes in insolation. Our results indicate that orbital-scale Antarctic climate change lags Northern Hemisphere insolation by a few millennia, and that the increases in Antarctic temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration during the last four terminations occurred within the rising phase of Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. These results support the Milankovitch theory that Northern Hemisphere summer insolation triggered the last four deglaciations.last_img read more

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Beyond the Blue Ridge: Cycling the Off Season on San Juan Island

first_imgThe San Juan Islands are a hidden gem off the coast of Washington State that many consider a bicycling paradise. Within the 172 named islands in the archipelago, the three main islands with the most miles to ride are San Juan Island, Orcas Island and Lopez Island. All are extremely bike-friendly, as evidenced by the marked bike pull-offs that lined the island’s main highway and the low-traffic roads. While the summer season is beautiful and boasts picture-perfect weather, cycling the largest of the islands, San Juan Island, in the off-season is budget-friendly and less crowded. It’s worth the trip as long as you are prepared and don’t mind a little bit of rain!So why visit the Pacific Northwest to cycle during what is historically the wettest time of the year? Out of the average 247 days of sunshine, November is known to receive an average of 4.33 inches of precipitation.The variable weather patterns add a challenge that some cyclists enjoy tackling.In the off-season, you’re much more likely to see locals out and about, and they’re less busy with tourists and more willing to engage with you. In addition to less crowds at restaurants, the roads are practically empty, so this is a prime opportunity to cycle the island. The only downside to traveling to San Juan Island in the off-season is that a few of the businesses close down at the end of October. Be sure to plan ahead and check on hours. Grab your panniers and rain jacket, and map out your trip to cycle around San Juan Island.Cycling San Juan IslandThe main cycling loop is comprised of the North South and West San Juan Scenic Byways. The terrain covers rolling hills as you cycle along coastlines, through Pacific Northwest forests and past farmland. With a list of attractions to hit along the route, you can circumnavigate the 43 mile route in a day.Start with a ride to the Southern coast of San Juan Island. The ride out to American Camp passes by vast farmland. Your first stop will be Jackson Beach, a sandy stretch of beach populated with driftwood. Further down Cattle Point Road, American Camp, a National Historic Park, is the site where the American soldiers stayed during the U.S./British occupation in the mid-1800s. In rainy weather and the Pacific Northwest’s fog, the park’s battlefields add an element of mystery to the historical remnants to the trip. Continue cycling on Cattle Point Road and as the road rises, you’ll get a bird’s eye view of South Beach and the expanding coastline. Cattle Point Lighthouse is at the bottom of a steeply graded road (about 10.5 percent), so you may decide to admire from the top of the hill. Take a break at the picnic tables, meander through the grassy fields, and look across the coastline to where this lighthouse was once a beacon for ships in the 1800s.One of the prime spots on the island for wildlife is at Lime Kiln Point State Park. Bikes aren’t allowed on the hiking trails, so lock them up at the visitor center, or you can easily walk the trails with them. The Marine Life Overlook is a short walk down the gravel path directly behind the park office, and here is where you can scan the water for both orcas and seals. Further along the trail, the lighthouse at Lime Kiln Point State Park juts out from the coastline. It was built in 1919, and still serves as a beacon for vessels in the Haro Strait. The park offers 1.6 miles of trail that loop around the park, meandering on the coastline and dipping into the lush, moss-laden woods.From the Southern Coast, make a detour inland to see one of San Juan Island’s many agritourism farms, Pelindaba Lavender Farm, which is only open from May through October .The peak time to visit for “peak purpleness”, as the company calls it, is July and August. If you can’t make it out to the farm, or it’s closed in off season, you can stop by the shop in Friday Harbor. Both the farm and shop sell a variety of lavender products, essential oils and plants. The farm features more than 25,000 lavender plants, and 50 different varieties. Since 2001, Pelindaba has been open to the public to demonstrate the wide diversity of lavender.The bike from the lavender farm to the next farm, Krystal Acres Alpaca Farm, takes you over some of the more challenging hills on the island on Mitchell Bay Road and West Valley Road. You’ll know when you see the farm, because the pastures around the farm are filled with 70 fluffy grazing alpacas. Stop into the gift shop, where you may meet one of the owners, Kris, who breeds the alpacas for shows. The farm sells warm socks and other items that are made from both the Alpacas on the island, and from Peru.It’s a two-mile bike to Roche Harbor, one of the private seaside resort and residential communities on the island. This part of the island is its own community, that in summers often bustles with vacationers. In the off-season, it’s quaint and quiet, but worth a stop to rest the legs and grab lunch.The San Juan Island Distillery is a short jaunt from Roche Harbor. The distillery is only open on weekends, so plan your ride so that you can visit. The distillery makes 12 different gins, liqueurs, an award-winning apple brandy (distilled using French techniques), and cider from their Westcott Bay Cider orchard. If you can’t make it to the distillery, or wine is more your thing, just a little further down the road is San Juan Vineyards.The winery’s two estate grapes, Siegerrebe and Madeleine Angevine, account for about 20-30 percent of the total annual production, while the rest of their wines are produced on-site from grapes shipped in from the Yakima Valley and Horse Heaven Hills Appellations of Eastern Washington.The tasting room is an old schoolhouse from 1895, and was renovated when the winery was purchased in 1996.  Tastings are a bargain; three wines for $5!Before the final ride back to Friday Harbor-only about three miles- look across the street at the farmland and you’ll see on the horizon… is that a camel?! Yes, a camel had somehow found its way onto San Juan Island. Turns out her name is Mona, and she’s a well-known character for anyone who drives (or bikes) on Roche Harbor Road. Her story is fascinating– she was bought by a pilot who then left the island, and her new owners bought her from an ad in the island paper.Where to Stay- The Tucker HouseSan Juan Island is home to several bed and breakfasts in addition to small, boutique hotels. You won’t find chains here! For a cycling trip, you can count on a hearty breakfast to adequately fuel for rides if you stay at a bed and breakfast. One that is just a few blocks from Friday Harbor is Tucker House, part of the San Juan Island Inn Collection. The bed and breakfast is charming with antique decor, a tiny kitchen for guest’s use, a well-lit sunroom, and even  fresh cookies. In addition to daily breakfast, each afternoon a special treat is waiting for you in your room, like homemade chocolate, thumbprint cookies or white chocolate macadamia nut cookies. Breakfast at The Tucker House always includes a two course meal: seasonal fruit, homemade yogurt and granola for course one, and some sort of filling, fresh hot dish for course two. Ingredients are locally sourced and the meals are substantial and filling enough to last you through the morning.Where to EatCask & Schooner– This is a great, affordable option that is reminiscent of the gastropubs in the East. The pub-style fare, like all the island restaurants, highlights farm-grown food from the island, including Westcott Bay oysters, clams, and mussels. The servings are hearty and the menu features comfort food like bangers and mash, shepherd’s pie and fish and chips.Coho Restaurant – This is one of the high-end restaurants on the island, owned by the same group as the bed and breakfast, the Tucker House. The menu is a balance of sustainable, island-grown ingredients that are influenced by Pacific and Mediterranean cuisines. Dine multi-course here, and know that each plating will be artfully presented to you. This is the place to get a bottle of wine, as the list has been recognized with an Award of Excellence by Wine Spectator for five years in a row. Roche Harbor: Lime Kiln Cafe– During the off-season, there are only two open restaurants in Roche Harbor, and Lime Kiln Cafe is the spot for breakfast and lunch. It makes a nice stop for lunch during your ride, as the place is casual and you can eat in your bike clothes. The large windows in the restaurant overlook the harbor, so do some wildlife watching while you eat. The cafe-style menu features sandwiches and a few salads. If you come in the morning, or want a sweet treat, try one of their donuts, made in-house every morning.How to Get There:San Juan Island and its sister islands are accessible a few different ways, including the Washington State Ferry, Victoria Clipper, sea plane or a regional flight.last_img read more

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48 Hours in Johnson City, Tennessee

first_imgSoHoImage: Panaramio // SparkdogGo for a Run or a Ride on the Tweetsie TrailThe former ET&WNC rail line sat abandoned for decades, until the largest rails-to-trails project in Tennessee converted the long-defunct spur line into the Tweetsie Trail. The trail ambles ten miles between downtown Johnson City and downtown Elizabethton on a relatively flat grade and is perfect for running, biking, or just a leisurely stroll. The trail can be picked up at any point along its downtown length, or at the trailhead on Alabama St.Day Two:Hike Buffalo Mtn.Obtained in 1994 through a land swap with the U.S. Forest Service, Buffalo Mountain Park boasts 725 acres of dense forest and rugged topography relatively close to town. Not a place of great renown regionally, but much loved by locals, Buffalo Mountain is a fantastic day hike with unexpected rewards; White Rock overlook and Tip Top overlook lend hikers some of the most spectacular views to be seen so close to the comforts of town.Touch everything at Hands On MuseumFor families visiting Downtown Johnson City, Hands On Museum is exactly what it sounds like: a museum where visitors are allowed, and encouraged, to touch everything in sight. Recently home to the traveling ‘Bodies’ exhibit, and housing exhibits on space, weather, TV news production, and a vast array of varied and unique learning experiences, Hands On is wildly popular with local kids, and local kids-at-heart.FoodFreiberg’sOpened in 2008 by native German Andreas Herholz, a newly-minted American citizen, Freiberg’s very quickly became a local favorite. Everything in the cozy, rustic corner restaurant on Fountain Square in Downton Johnson City is made from scratch and fully authentic German fare. A full tap of imported German beers and every combination of schnitzels, brats, kraut, and potatoes imaginable make Freiberg a one-of-a-kind gem downtown, and welcome respite from humdrum culinaria. Check them out on Facebook for more info.Holy TacoA copious and continually-rotating beer selection and a full menu of tacos, tamales, burritos, and nachos make this downtown taco joint a frequent haunt for loads of locals. A patio, open during the warmer months, adds to the possibilities for you and your party people. Also during the warmer months, the local Trek Bikes store hosts a giant group ride through the historic Tree Streets district of downtown Johnson City. The aptly-named Taco Trek terminates at the back gates of Holy Taco for tacos and hard-earned cervezas.Dos Gatos Coffee BarThe former Brew Plum Coffee Bar, newly rebranded to honor owner Dick Nelson’s two cats, Georgia and O’Keefe, has continued its role as an oasis for coffee lovers in Downtown Johnson City. Located inside Nelson’s Fine Art Gallery on Main Street, this new-old coffee shop serving Stumptown beans is known far and wide for one treat in particular: Nitro-infused coffees. Nelson has expanded that concept to cover nitro-infused Earl Grey teas, in addition to the stunning fresh-made pumpkin syrups and other flavorings for seasonal drinks, as well as constantly expanding food offerings. Dos Gatos is a must-visit, especially for a Saturday morning jolt before tackling Buffalo Mountain or driving up to Carver’s Gap to hike Roan Mountain. Visit Dos Gatos on Facebook for hours and to find out what treats Nelson’s crew is currently serving up.Willow Tree Coffeehouse and Music RoomAffectionately referred to as ‘Johnson City’s living room,’ The Willow Tree on Main Street in Downtown Johnson City serves up a full compliment of locally-roasted coffee and fantastic specialty drinks, as well as a menu of lunch specials that Johnson City’s denizens swear by. The house-made pimento cheese sandwich is a smash hit. At night, nearly every evening finds local artists playing in the music room, or some traveling troubadours such as Ashville’s River Whyless gracing the stage. Wednesdays give would-be singer-songwriters their 15 minutes of fame for Open Mic Nights. One rule at the Willow Tree: listen to the music. Conversation can wait.Scratch PizzaFew places in Johnson City elicit such deep sighs and far-off gazes from the locals as Scratch. This wood-fired pizza joint in the heart of downtown feels like home to Johnson City-ites. Mostly because it is, in fact, a home. Built in an old house on the corner of South Roan St. and Unaka Ave., the weirdest little pizza place in all the land serves up huge pies with any smorgasbord of toppings diners dare to ask for from top-notch pepperoni or capicola to shaved salmon and mandarin oranges. Or, act like a local; just walk right in and order a ‘Trust Pizza.’ Account for allergies or personal exclusions and then hand over purview of your pie to the masters behind the counter. They never, ever disappoint. Mexican Coca-Cola and the lauded local favorite Dr. Enuf fill the coolers, and guests are encouraged to find a record they like from the crate, and change the tunes at their discretion.ScratchImage: RoadFood.comLibations and NightlifeYeeHaw BrewingPouring their first pint in summer 2015, Johnson City’s first true microbrewery boasts a strong pedigree in the form of former Lagunitas brewer Brandon Greenwood. YeeHaw keeps a solid stable of meticulously-crafted styles on hand including a true pilsner, Munich dunkel, Scottish ale, pale ale, IPA, Oktoberfest, and winter porter. Yahoo Travel thought so much of the upstart brewery that they recently named YeeHaw the best brewery in the state of Tennessee. Housed in the former Tweetsie Depot on the edge of Downtown, YeeHaw’s taproom welcomes those thirsty among us with a lively ambience that includes skee-ball and comfortable seating in abundance inside, and plenteous patio space around a tri-star fire pit – an homage to the state flag – outside. Paired with a crispy pork belly or Korean bulgogi taco from the attached White Duck Taco Shop, YeeHaw’s brews are a must while in JC.rsz_yeehaw_taproompatio1Image: YeeHaw BrewingJohnson City Brewing Company: A passion project turned side hustle turned full-fledged nano-brewery (and soon to be micro-brewery), JCB is a local favorite. Step into their brand-spanking-new downtown taproom at the corner of East Main St. and Roan St. and you’ll soon find out why. The (literally) dozens of owners of the venture are a creative force. In an era where throwing more hops into a beer and aging it in a bourbon barrel is passed off as avant garde, the folks at JCB have hung on to the homebrew ethos of experimentation. There’s never any telling what they’ve got a special barrel of, just waiting to be unleashed on a choice few lucky imbibers. In their new location, and with their in-progress production facility upgrade, JCB is poised to become the beer of Johnson City. Need proof? For the grand opening shindig of their new space in November, the street was blocked off and the line for a beer could have left time for reading a David Foster Wallace novel. Bottom line: It’s good beer made here by good people. Pay a visit to their Facebook page for up-to-date hours and offerings.screen-shot-2016-11-17-at-1-44-29-pmMain St. PizzaJustifiably included in either the Libations or the Food section, Main St. Pizza is an unexpected chimera of fantastic pizza and pasta joint, and creative cocktail bar. The constantly-changing menu of house cocktails never fails to disappoint; there is always a new drink on the board to try. Past concoctions have included the Flannel Shirt, a blend of beer, Tennessee whiskey, lemon, maple syrup, and candied bacon, and the Southern Belle, a smoked mixture of Earl Grey-infused brandy and allspice dram. Situated on the corner of Main St. and South Roan St., with huge windows and late hours that allow for premium people watching, Main St. has a well-earned reputation as a downtown favorite. Try the Pine Street Pesto pie. You’ll be glad you did.Wellington’sHoused in the Carnegie Hotel, a rebuilt homage to the city’s upscale hotel lost to a fire in the 1920s, Wellington’s is the preferred destination for good whisk(e)y imbibed by a fire in leather chairs. Wellington’s is home to a truly massive selection of bourbon and Scotch whiskies, which can be enjoyed in the main bar area, or taken down the hall to the Roosevelt Library, a lounge area paying its respects to the truest traditions of ‘20s era hotel life. Adam makes a mean Sazerac. Don’t leave without one.The Down HomeOwned and operated by Ed Snodderly whose lyrics are inscribed on the walls of the Country Music Hall of Fame, The Down Home is a music venue in its purest form. In an unassuming section of West Main Street, in an equally unassuming building, the Down Home plays host to the likes of young guns like Parker Millsap, and established names like Dan Tyminski, and Noam Pikelny of Punch Brothers fame. Beer and simple fare are available, but when the music starts the patrons of the Down Home know the rules: they’re here to listen. The result is an intimate, communal music experience that draws serious musicians and serious patrons with one common love: good shared art.LodgingCarden’s Bluff CampgroundCarden’s Bluff, open mid-April through early November, offers 40 sites, primarily for tent camping, on a peninsula overlooking the 6,430-acre Watauga Lake and surrounded by the Cherokee National Forest. Waking up overlooking the sunrise coming up over Watauga is an experience that every lover of the natural world must experience. A bathhouse with flush toilets offers a bastion of creature comfort in the otherwise simple facility. From Hampton, Tenn., a left turn onto State Route 321, and three more miles will lead campers to the site.UntitledImage: Ryan LeeCarnegie HotelFor visitors to Johnson City looking for more upscale accommodations the Carnegie Hotel, a AAA Four-Diamond hotel, is the place to bed down for the evening. 128 guestrooms and 11 suites, including four Presidential Suites offer guests modern comforts in a recreated and rebuilt (the original hotel was lost to a fire) hotel from the 1920s. On site, guests will find the aforementioned Wellington’s, a fantastic stop for dinner and drinks, as well as the Austin Springs Spa, if a little pampering is on the agenda.Jonesborough B&BsApproximately 15 minutes from Johnson City is Jonesborough, Tennessee’s oldest town. In addition to a main street filled with small, unique shops including an artisan chocolatier and a record shop, Jonesborough is home to a number of charming bed and breakfasts all along Main Street. Soak up the history of the state’s oldest town, and let the morning linger a little in accommodations that have been welcoming visitors to the area since the 18th century.ShoppingThe Fouled AnchorDowntown Johnson City is no stranger to the blight of the disappearance of small business wasting disease. But through the dedicated efforts and long-shot gambles of advocates and business owners, downtown Johnson City’s once-thriving shops are being reborn and imbued with new energy. One of those shops is The Fouled Anchor, a West Main Street shop featuring handcrafted goods for men. From clothing from Crawford Denim in California, to axes and hatchets from Victor Axe and Tool in Michigan, to that icon of the American working man, Stanley, the wares in this downtown mecca of manhood are intentionally curated and perfectly suited to the man looking to break out of the big box mold. TFAImage: The Fouled AnchorOvermountain OutdoorsA brand-spankin-new addition to the outfitter game in JC, Overmountain Outdoors’ Market Street shop features a carefully-chosen selection of goods for intrepid adventurers from proven brands such as Astral and Bertucci in a quickly reawakening downtown setting. Check them out on Instgram.Honorable MentionC.S. McCullough’s Barber ShopOpened on East Main St. in January 2016, and now hosting the Fouled Anchor’s retail space, this old-school joint named for owner Randy Almanzor’s grandfather has everything a man could want in a barber shop. Large leather couches and chairs populate the waiting area, the smell of an honest-to-god barber shop hits you square in the face, and someone offers you a beer as soon as you walk in the door. That should be enough of a sell, but the barbers and stylists are top-notch pros at any style you could possibly ask them about, including an old-school hot lather, straight razor shave. Complete with a bracing blast of aftershave (if you want). Play shuffleboard while you wait, or browse the manly wares that The Fouled Anchor has on offer. Regulars also know the secret of the gutted and refurbished Frigidaire that’s been turned into a whisk(e)y locker. Bring a bottle, put your name on it, and enjoy a pour from your preferred stash whenever you come in for a trim. One rule: If you bring Pappy, you have to share. Book an appointment in seconds online at csbarbers.com and recieve reminders and confirmations via text or email.screen-shot-2016-11-17-at-1-47-10-pm[divider]About the Author[/divider]Ryan Lee is a freelance writer, history nerd, and  trout bum living and working in Johnson City, Tenn. You can check out more of his work at pryanlee.com. Johnson City, Tennessee is a place born of the blast of steam engine whistles and the hushed whispers of ties to Prohibition’s most notorious kingpin. Blossoming from a modest watering stop to a full-fledged hub of the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad, and playing host to Al Capone–or so the locals say–imbues the town of 63,000 with a rich history all its own. Nestled in the mountains of East Tennessee, surrounded by lakes and rivers renowned for their bounty of trout and bass, and serving as the gateway to the Cherokee National Forest, Johnson City is a town rediscovering itself. A reawakening downtown, a brand new microbrewery invigorating a long-simmering beer culture, and new parks and trails on the rise give Johnson City a future that is sure to be as storied as its past.Day One:Fish South Holston TailwaterOnce described as “’A River Runs Through It’ on mescaline,” the tail water of the Tennessee Valley Authority’s South Holston Dam boasts around 8,500 trout per mile; 80% of that massive population are wild. SoHo, as the locals affectionately know it, begins approximately 20 miles from Johnson City proper. South Holston Fly Shop sits on Emmett Rd., en route to the most easily accessible spots on the river, including Osceola Island, not far below the dam. Orvis’ 2014 National Guide of the Year, Patrick Fulkrod, also calls SoHo his home water. With water temperatures that vary only about 10 degrees over the course of the year, SoHo is perfect for wading or floating any time of the year. January through March see a lot of action on Black Duns, Blue Wing Olives, Olive Soft Hackles, and the trusty Pheasant Tail Nymph.last_img read more

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Is somebody listening in?

first_img Is somebody listening in? Is somebody listening in? July 15, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Does it seem your client’s competitors know his or her every move? That someone is stealing information vital to your client’s success? Could it be your client’s offices, or yours, are bugged?Sounds like something out of a James Bond movie, but don’t automatically laugh. In this busy world of cellular and satellite communications, the security and privacy of conversations are more vulnerable than ever, according to Doug Kelly, president of Polytronics International in Tampa, a company that does debugging sweeps.“While only a small percentage of sweeps actually result in the discovery of a listening device, it’s no longer paranoia for a client – or even your own firm – to suspect the presence of an eavesdropping scheme,” said Kelly, who says he derives 50 percent of his business from lawyers or lawyer referrals. “It’s far too simple for an eavesdropper disguised as a maintenance or repair subcontractor to gain access to a residence or office and in seconds plant a $100 transmitter.”Kelly, who has been featured on HBO’s “America Undercover” and quoted in the New York Times and Science Digest, said the following recent cases typify what often happens when someone suspects a transmitter or phone tap is in their midst:• An attorney advised that his client’s company was losing bids by such small margins that coincidence was considered unlikely. A threat assessment concluded either a trusted employee was tipping off a competitor for profit or spite, or an eavesdropping penetration had occurred. “A countermeasures (debugging) sweep took place and, sure enough, active transmitters were discovered in the offices of the president and CFO,” Kelly said. “The devices were left intact and a ruse developed to trap the eavesdropper – who was indeed sponsored by a major competitor.”• The owner of an insurance agency kept losing clients to a former employee who had left the firm to open his own practice. He contacted his attorney, who in turn asked Kelly to sweep the premises. However, the owner – certain he was the victim of an eavesdropping penetration – became dismayed when the sweep turned up no evidence of any listening devices. “Further investigation finally provided the answer: The former employee was simply calling the owner’s answering service to get his messages,” Kelly said.While Kelly admits there are far easier ways that information is stolen, such as a mole, a dumpster diver, a software bug or feature allowing someone other than the intended user to access a computer, or a disgruntled employee, he said when called on to do a sweep, he finds bugs 10 to 15 percent of the time — “which isn’t to infer that 10 to 15 percent of all lawyers are bugged, just those who suspect it.”So how do you locate a responsible sweeper if a client has a legitimate reason to be suspicious? Kelly said a good starting point is to ask a prospective firm the following questions:• What equipment do you use? The answer should be clear and detailed, and include brand names. “Don’t buy into vague or generic statements, such as the gear is homemade or former CIA stuff,” he said.• Can you send me a copy of a recent report with your client’s name deleted? “If they balk, you should too; if they agree, the quality of the report will speak for itself,” Kelly said.• Tell me about your background and experience? “You should hear specific training courses,” Kelly said. “While many good technicians are indeed former government employees, the wannabes almost always claim to be either CIA-trained or a former cop who ‘did all that kind of work’ for the force.”last_img read more

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US coronavirus deaths projected at over 74,000 by August

first_imgThe US death toll from the coronavirus outbreak could exceed 74,000 by August, according to the University of Washington’s predictive model, often cited by White House officials and state public health authorities.Late on Monday, the university’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) model raised its projected US death toll to 74,073 by Aug. 4, up from nearly 67,000 predicted a week ago, and 60,000 predicted two weeks ago.The figure is down from about a month ago, when it projected around 90,000 COVID-19 deaths in the United States. IHME director Christopher Murray said the death toll would climb if states reopen their economies too early.Several US states have eased restrictions on businesses, and more are ready to follow.Stay-at-home orders issued by governors across the United States and subsequent decisions to slowly reopen state economies have turned into highly charged political issues in recent weeks as the shutdowns have hammered the nation’s economy.US coronavirus deaths surpassed 56,000 on Monday, according to a Reuters tally. The United States has by far the world’s largest number of confirmed coronavirus cases at more than 993,000.Globally, cases have topped 3 million, with a total of more than 210,000 deaths, Reuters calculations show  Topics :last_img read more

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OPT and Premier Oil ink deal for lead-in PowerBuoy o&g lease

first_imgOcean Power Technologies (OPT) has signed a contract with Premier Oil to supply its wave-harnessing PowerBuoy for the deployment in an oil and gas field in the Central North Sea.The deployment is planned for the Huntington Field under a nine-month lease, which includes an initial three-month trial, followed by a six-month extension upon successful completion of the initial trial, the US-based wave energy developer OPT informed.The project is expected to start in June 2018, while the deployment is anticipated in October of 2018, according to OPT, which also said the contract includes an option to extend the initial nine-month lease.The OPT PowerBuoy will serve as a self-sustaining intelligent platform to provide communications and remote monitoring services at its North Sea site. During the deployment, Premier Oil will explore the PowerBuoy capabilities and its ability to monitor the local environment and alert shipping of its position, OPT said.The first time wave power device to be deployed on UKCS oil and gas development, OGTC saysThe project is also backed by the Aberdeen-based Oil & Gas Technology Centre (OGTC), which has provided co-funding, support and technical input to the monitoring requirements for the buoy.Chris Pearson, Small Pools Solution Centre Manager for the Oil & Gas Technology Centre, said: “The PowerBuoy is an exciting technology and the project represents the first time that a wave power device is being deployed on the United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) on an oil and gas development.“The system can provide monitoring to safeguard subsea safety zones and generate power with a view to operate subsea assets, meaning it fits well with our focus on reducing the cost of decommissioning and unlocking small pools.”In parallel with the Huntington Field deployment, an evaluation is under way with Premier Oil to consider another longer-term deployment where, in addition to site monitoring services, thePowerBuoy would be utilized to power and communicate with subsea control modules to monitor pressures and temperatures within the wells, according to OPT.The planning could begin in late 2018, with potential installation in the summer of 2019, OPT noted.George H. Kirby, President and Chief Executive Officer of OPT, said: “This commercial contract is a breakthrough for OPT and reflects our continuing commitment to support customers where decommissioning activities can benefit from an autonomous solution for surveillance and monitoring.”Pieter voor de Poorte, Premier Oil’s Subsea Decommissioning Lead, commented: “We think this technology has a lot of potential and it aligns well with our goals of increasing safety, efficiency and operational effectiveness. It also opens up potential future applications for intelligent, remotely controlled small field developments.”last_img read more

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Conclave cardinals choose new Pope

first_img Share Bells rang as the white smoke poured outWhite smoke billowing from the Sistine Chapel chimney has announced to the world that cardinals gathered inside have elected a new Pope to head the Catholic Church.Crowds in St Peter’s Square cheered and bells rang out as the smoke appeared.The name of the new Pope is expected to be announced shortly.He will replace Pope Benedict XVI, who stepped down last month saying he was no longer strong enough to lead the Church.The 115 cardinals have been in isolation since Tuesday afternoon, and held four inconclusive votes before electing a Pope.Before the conclave began, there was no clear frontrunner to replace Benedict.BBC News Share Tweet FaithInternationalLifestylePrint Conclave cardinals choose new Pope by: – March 13, 2013center_img Share Sharing is caring! 42 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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Opposition Leader alarmed at productivity consultant’s report

first_img Share Tweet Share Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img LocalNews Opposition Leader alarmed at productivity consultant’s report by: – January 30, 2012 46 Views   3 comments Hon. Edison James. (file photo)Leader of the United Workers Party Edison James has expressed alarm over a report by government’s productivity consultant Parry Bellot, who claimed that 80% of the country’s public servants are inefficient.He said if indeed the findings do reflect the true state of productivity levels of the public service, it is caused for concerns.“While the wishy washy method, by which these findings were arrived at, cast serious doubts on their reliability and usefulness, they are in fact findings which must have been accepted by the Roosevelt Skerrit administration, since no self-respecting consultation would go public with his or her findings without the knowledge and consent of the authorities. If the findings are true, then it confirms what the UWP has held all along, that this government is all about politicking, rather than managing the economy and the fears of this country,” James explained.He said it must be remembered that every department of government is according to the constitution, under the direction and control of a minister.“It appears that over the past several years, ministers of government have simply been going to parliament, talking and taking salaries but producing very little, and in some cases nothing at all,” James said.He said government must now accept full responsibility “for the dismal state of affairs highlighted by its consultant, or it must rubbish the report, fire Bellot, demand a refund of all monies paid to him and embark upon a serious program to deal with the matter of productivity levels throughout the country’s workforce”.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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Losing to Win

first_imgPro basketball and pro football have developed a new strategy.  If you think your team is not very good, you purposely lose (or it appears as if you do) so you can get a top draft pick for the next season.  The Philadelphia 76er’s of the NBA have been doing so for the last 3 years.  Last year they lost 63 of their 82 games and got draft pick #3.  The  worst 5 teams enter a lottery for the top pick, and they drew 3rd.  Evidently, their owner liked this system so well that his team lost their first 17 games this year and were 10 and 38 when this article was written.  By the way, this is the worst record in basketball this year.Along with constant losing, they also have the lowest payroll and their budget is the farthest below the league salary cap.  This means that when free agents are available they have the largest margin to go out and try to sign these free agents.  The only problem with this is how long will you go with this strategy before you start to win.  The Houston Astros of baseball have been doing it for 4 years, and they still had one of the worst records in baseball last year.Owner Josh Harris of the 76er’s says last year was a great success for them.  Try to sell that to your fan base when you had the worst record in the league.  Also, if you get a top draft pick, can you sign him to play for such a loser?last_img read more

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