University Of Evansville CiSM Project Receives $1 Million Grant for Scholarships from the NSF…

first_imgUniversity Of Evansville CISM Project Receives $1 Million Grant for Scholarships from the NSF S-STEM ProgramThe University of Evansville’s Computers in Science and Math (CISM) project has been awarded a grant totaling $999,934 to fund scholarships for academically talented students with financial need majoring in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, environmental science, mathematics, physics, or statistics and data science.The project, funded by the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) program, is led by UE faculty members Joyce Stamm, professor of biology; Angela Reisetter, associate professor of physics; Adam Salminen, associate professor of mathematics; and Sarah Wilson, assistant professor of chemistry.The CISM scholarships will be available beginning in the fall 2020 semester and will provide up to $10,000 per year for four years to two cohorts of seven or eight students. These students will be part of an interdisciplinary learning community established through an all-expenses-paid bridge course during the summer before the freshman year and maintained as the students live together in UE’s honors residence hall and enroll together in computational problem-solving courses. CISM students will also receive summer research and conference attendance funds, and CISM-specific academic advising, career preparation, and mentoring.“This interdisciplinary cohort approach will prepare our students for a real work setting, where biologists and mathematicians may work alongside chemists and physicists toward a common goal,” said Stamm. “The interpersonal skills developed from living and working together are just as, if not more, important than the technical skills gained through coursework. It allows them to learn to speak the same language.”Reisetter added, “Computational problem-solving skills are not currently emphasized in UE’s math and science curriculum, so we’re particularly excited to develop additional talents in our students, which will translate into broader career opportunities and workplace success upon graduation.”To develop these skills, the project will introduce a scaffolded curriculum with four interdisciplinary computational problem-solving courses. The first three courses will focus on the power of computational and data visualization skills in the sciences, and introduce students to interesting data-centric scientific projects. The fourth course will be part of the UE ChangeLab program and will pair student and faculty teams with a local business or nonprofit clients. Students will work with the clients to solve a problem involving experimental design, data collection, and/or data analysis. Because these courses will be open to all math and science majors at UE, the CISM project will have an impact beyond the scholarship recipients“The digital revolution has allowed scientists and businesses to collect vast quantities of data,” said Salminen. “Marketing firms, educators, and sports teams have gleaned knowledge and insights from this data for application to business techniques for many years. Of particular importance here is the growing need of these skills in the sciences.”Data scientists and statisticians work to develop new statistical approaches and develop new software and techniques of analysis. However, a scientist in other areas such as genomics, particle physics, and neuroscience need to use these techniques to unravel the massive amounts of data that they collect. Moving forward, scientists will need to have a better understanding of working with large data, and statisticians and mathematicians, with proper training and interest, can help tackle difficult problems throughout the sciences.In line with the NSF’s mission to improve STEM undergraduate education, another important goal of the project is to determine the impacts of the learning community on CISM scholars.“We will assess each of the project’s activities using a mixed-methods approach, to examine how involvement in the CISM community affects students’ science and mathematics self-efficacy, sense of community, retention, success, and progression to STEM careers,” said Wilson. “We hope that the CISM project will serve as a model for interdisciplinary STEM education at institutions similar to UE.”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Geary’s Bakery revamps Jason’s sourdough range

first_imgSource: Geary’s BakeryGeary’s Bakery has refreshed its Jason’s brand with a new name and branding in a move which it said reinforces its sourdough credentials and heritage.Previously called Jason’s followed by the tagline ‘Baked with Love’, the three-strong range has been rebranded as Jason’s Sourdough. It first rolled out in M&S stores earlier this year, with an rsp of £1.80 per loaf.The ‘Ciabattin’ loaves – described as a classic ciabatta mashed up with a sourdough process – come in three variants: White, Grains & Seeds and Craft Beer. They are baked using a 24-hour fermentation process which Geary’s said is typical of small batch sourdough loaves. This ensures it has ‘full flavour’ without the need for added preservatives, sugars or additives, it added.Alongside the new name, the range also has updated packaging. Described as ‘punchier’ and ‘modern’, the refreshed branding showcases the family bakery’s history and each loaf has a recipe number, adapted from the family’s recipe book as well.The new packaging also features a transparent window and is resealable. It also highlights how Geary’s recommends consumers enjoy the loaves with the line ‘perfect for your toaster’.“We are delighted to be re-launching with new modern and striking packaging that really highlights the bread in its best light and showcases what we are all about – great tasting, properly made sourdough,” said Jason Geary, master baker and managing director of Geary’s – who the loaves are named after.“Jason’s Sourdough is really special, each ‘Ciabattin’ loaf is baked with a commitment to quality, time and patience and is a result of my personal passion to baking bread the right, time honoured way to deliver amazing taste. We are all really proud of this product and can’t wait to see the new packaging on the shelves.”last_img read more

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Watch The Infamous Stringdusters Cover Phish, Grateful Dead In Chicago [Videos/Gallery]

first_imgLoad remaining images The show concluded with an encore of Grateful Dead’s “Deal,” and you can watch the monster jam at the end of that cover thanks to Anjenete Wey.Check out a gallery of photos below, courtesy of Kristine Condon Photography: Last night, March 11th, The Infamous Stringdusters settled into the Park West venue in Chicago, IL for a barn burner of a performance. The show came along the band’s “Ladies & Gentlemen” tour, featuring the vocal stylings of Nicki Bluhm. Bluhm and the Stringdusters are a match made in heaven, as evidenced by their recent collaborative performance on Jam Cruise.Their performance in Chicago did not disappoint, as the group got their Phish on with a cover of “Bathtub Gin,” as captured by Phishatthemann below:The band also played a cover of “Ginseng Sullivan,” originally by Norman Blake but certainly popularized in the jam scene by its inclusion in the Phish repertoire. Watch that video below, though beware of the mislabeled title:last_img read more

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Greyboy Allstars Supergroup Leads Funk Fest At The Brooklyn Bowl [Gallery]

first_imgFor the first time in years, Karl Denson brought his illustrious Greyboy Allstars supergroup to the stage of the Brooklyn Bowl for a glorious night of musical celebration. The Greyboy Allstars have long been recognized as one of the best jazz/funk crews in the business, and have recently revived the supergroup collective after years of inactivity. Featuring Karl Denson, Robert Walter, Elgin Park, Chris Stillwell and more, the group always lives up to their “Allstar” name by laying down some serious groove-age.The night started with a set from Scott Metzger’s band, Wolf!. Metzger continues to make a name for himself in the scene with cutting guitarwork, and his work in Joe Russo’s Almost Dead has turned heads everywhere. The band got to work warming up an excited room, and the Greyboy crew brought it home for a great evening of music.Take a look at images of the great night from Andrew Scott Blackstein Photography: Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Using new media to save the old

first_imgFor most college students wanting to leave their mark on the world, having helped Mark Zuckerberg launch Facebook would be more than enough. But Chris Hughes ’06, who helped to lead the social network’s growth in its early years, now has his sights set on upending a slightly less sexy medium — magazines.Nine years and a day after he and Zuckerberg took Facebook live from their Kirkland House dorm room, Hughes returned to campus on Tuesday to discuss his latest underdog venture: his plan to reinvigorate the ailing but venerable magazine The New Republic, which he purchased last spring.“I believe in the power of great writing to shape how we see the world,” Hughes said in a conversation at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) sponsored by the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy. “That sounds incredibly idealistic, and it is lofty, but I’m not ashamed of it.”Hughes’ idealism has served him well thus far, as he has ventured into new-media startups, national politics, and now traditional publishing.“Chris Hughes did something counterintuitive all the way along the line,” said the conversation’s moderator, Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center and a lecturer in public policy at HKS.Unlike many tech founders who found overnight success (including Zuckerberg and their fellow roommate, Dustin Moskovitz), Hughes stayed in Cambridge to finish his degree. In 2007, he left his job as Facebook spokesman at the height of the company’s hype to work on social media initiatives for Barack Obama’s presidential campaign, then a long shot. When Hughes assumed majority ownership of The New Republic last March, taking over as publisher and editor in chief, he seemed to be signaling a desire to make his mark in yet another field.“He has taken this venerable institution [The New Republic], and this venerable profession, journalism, and is looking at them informed by his deep knowledge of digital technology and the digital world,” Jones said.Last month, the 98-year-old journal of politics and arts launched redesigned versions of its website and biweekly print magazine, reflecting Hughes’ desire to rethink the publication’s advertising structure and its content.“I think it should be profitable, and I think it’s our challenge to prove to ourselves and to the world that we can find a profitable model,” Hughes said. But “the era when there were sizable profits in this industry is over. … The idea that we’re going to find some business model that is going to return us to the point of prosperity of 20 or 30 years ago is, I think, wishful thinking.”Hughes’ goal of merely breaking even differs markedly from the current standard held by the owners of most publications, especially newspapers, Jones noted — perhaps shedding a bit of light on why Hughes’s gambit has captured the attention and hopes of so many working journalists and media insiders. (In a December profile, New York magazine suggested Hughes was a self-styled “savior from the future for the institutions of the past.”)Soundbytes: Smart News in the Age of Social MediaListen to Chris Hughes in conversation at the Shorenstein Center from Feb. 5, 2012.“I’m in this for the journalism, not to make a lot of money for myself,” Hughes said, adding that he expects the magazine will reach financial sustainability by 2015.The magazine is still experimenting with revenue models, he said. His overarching philosophy is that it must adapt to the way people are reading in the 21st century — mostly online, often on mobile devices, and frequently referred through social media links. With that in mind, the new website has enabled features such as bookmarking (allowing a reader to save his or her place in a particular story across web-enabled devices), audio versions of every story, and “marginalia” that can present authors’ footnotes, readers’ comments, and other outlets’ reactions to a piece alongside the story itself.“You have to create a culture where there’s a high amount of experimentation, where we’re really honest about what’s working and what’s not working thus far,” Hughes said. “That’s not something that’s necessarily been part of the DNA or part of the culture of the world of journalism for a long time, but I think there are a lot of brands and a lot of people out there who are trying to do that.”Hughes expects the same attitude of the historically liberal magazine’s in-house and freelance reporters, who in his view should be doing more than just filing or even promoting their own stories.“They’re also responsible for engaging in a dialogue with people on Twitter and on Facebook — people who hate it and people who love it,” he said. “The conversation that continues after a piece is where a lot of the impact can happen.”Recognizing that the days when “you give us $35 and we give you 20 issues of print” are likely over, Hughes has pushed for enhanced experiences for the magazine’s faithful, including subscriber-only events in major cities.“People are not generally willing to pay for access to content in a digital environment,” he said. “But I think they are interested in supporting brands that they believe in, and I think they’re interested and still willing to pay for experiences.”last_img read more

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Congressional Ag Fellows

first_imgSeven University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students have embarked on the opportunity of a lifetime: serving as Congressional Agricultural Fellows in Washington, D.C.The offices of Georgia Sens. David Perdue and Johnny Isakson and Reps. Sanford Bishop, Doug Collins, Buddy Carter, Rick Allen and Austin Scott are hosting the students during their 12-week fellowship in the nation’s capital.The students prepare briefs, attend committee hearings, and conduct food- and agriculture-related research as part of the fellowship. In addition, they have the option of earning credit hours toward graduation.“The 2018 Ag Fellows will join the longest-running UGA student internship program in Washington, D.C.,” said Josef Broder, CAES associate dean for academic affairs and fellowship program coordinator. “Launched in 1997, the Ag Fellows program has placed over 100 students with our congressional offices in Washington, D.C. The Ag Fellows program continues to be a premier experiential learning opportunity for students in our college. The program has been instrumental in shaping the careers and leadership aspirations of the Ag Fellows.”The students representing UGA as 2018 Congressional Agricultural Fellows:William Davison, a junior from Augusta, Georgia, studying agribusiness, works in Rep. Allen’s office.Phyllicia Thomas, a junior from Lithonia, Georgia, studying environmental economics and management, works in Rep. Bishop’s office.Madeline Rentz, a junior from Baxley, Georgia, studying agricultural communication, works in Rep. Carter’s office.Emma Johnston, a senior from Griffin, Georgia, studying food science, works in Rep. Collins’ office.Johnson Anna Collins, a junior from Pickens, Georgia, studying agribusiness, works in Sen. Isakson’s office.Mason Goolsby, a senior from Stockbridge, Georgia, studying agribusiness, works in Sen. Perdue’s office.William Hicks, a junior from Macon, Georgia, studying agribusiness, works in Rep. Scott’s office.The Congressional Agricultural Fellowship is part of the CAES Deans’ Promise program. The Deans’ Promise program, a collection of enrichment opportunities ranging from internships to study abroad programs, encourages CAES students to take advantage of unique, out-of-the-classroom experiences during their time in college.For more information on CAES, the Deans’ Promise or other opportunities available to students, visit www.students.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Japan to rule out coal-fired plants as international criticism rises

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Asahi Shimbun:The Environment Ministry said that in principle it will not sanction construction of new large coal-fired power plants nor boilers to existing facilities in line with Japan’s international pledges to tackle global warming.Moves are spreading worldwide to shun facilities that burn fossil fuels because they spew so much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.The policy initiative, announced March 28 by Environment Minister Yoshiaki Harada, follows criticism that Japan is reluctant to break with such power generation, particularly after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster.The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry has the final say on whether to approve new coal plant projects, but such decisions are supposed to take into account the environment minister’s opinion.As a matter of course, the Environment Ministry conducts an environmental impact assessment for new plants with an output capacity of 150,000 kilowatts or more.It will conduct more rigorous assessments in future and call for the rejection of projects with an emphasis on economic feasibility alone or those lacking measures to cut carbon dioxide emissions when the ministry presents its opinion to the industry ministry.More: Japan to rule out coal-fired plants as international criticism rises Japan to rule out coal-fired plants as international criticism riseslast_img read more

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Office space occupancy to drop further in 2021: Colliers

first_imgOffice occupancy rates in Indonesia’s major cities are expected to plunge further next year as supply increases at a time when demand remains weak amid the coronavirus pandemic.According to a projection by property consultancy Colliers International, office occupancy will plunge to just 78 percent in the central business districts (CBD) of Jakarta and Surabaya and to 79 percent in non-CBD areas, the lowest rates in years. This compares with 83.5 percent in the first quarter of this year for CBD and 84 percent for non-CBD areas.“This year is indeed a tough year for the office sector,” Colliers senior associate director of research Ferry Salanto said. “With the abnormal current market conditions and the large supply that is almost the same as last year’s, and given the fact that in the next year supply will be higher, occupancy will be decreasing,” he said. Jakarta and Surabaya have eased large-scale social restrictions (PSBB). However, public concerns over COVID-19 remain high as cases recently surge in the two major cities. While some offices are slashing capacity and rotating staff to enter office space, others still strictly enforce a work-from-home policy.“During the hardship, tenants are generally becoming much more vigilant in making decisions related to leasing a new office or extending a lease contract. Such options are most often postponed by companies,” Colliers’ report reads. “The way of thinking about [the] workplace is slowly changing, with current emphasis on safety and hygiene.”Colliers believes that the working-from-home (WFH) trend is likely to negatively affect office space utilization. In Jakarta, office absorption shows a decreasing trend from normal market conditions.Meanwhile, supply of office space in the capital’s CBD may grow by 0.5 percent in the second half of this year from 6.87 million square meters (sqm) at present. In the non-CBD areas, the current 2.49 million sqm of office space will increase by 4.8 percent by the end of the year as a large number of new projects will be completed.  In Surabaya, office supply is growing much faster, which is seen to lead to a significant drop in occupancy rates until next year. Office supply in Surabaya today is 482,000 sqm, while 230,000 sqm in new office space will enter the market by the end of next year.Average office occupancy in Surabaya is likely to drop to 60 percent in the second half from 68 percent in the first half of this year, the Colliers report shows.As low office utilization due to the pandemic is projected to continue for now, Ferry advised developers and building owners to be more flexible and provide offers such as reduced rent, smaller office spaces and flexibility in leasing payments and incentives. The office layout must also change to adapt to the new normal, which emphasizes distancing and health protocol in the workplace.Property consultant Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL) Indonesia head of research James Taylor said in May that Jakarta might experience the most significant impact from the pandemic on new leasing deals in the second quarter, as businesses continued to implement work-from-home arrangements.“However, we expect tenant demand to return once the worst of the crisis has passed. In some ways, COVID-19 is accelerating changes to the workplace that were already coming,” he said in a statement on May 26.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Railway carriage home proves time well spent for Innisfail property owner

first_imgLot 6 Shaw Rd, Innisfail, is listed for $240,000.TWO reinvented freezer railway carriages are the backbone of this durable, unique and loveable Innisfail property. Fred James, 72, was desperate to find a new home after selling his Flying Fish Point house to help pay for his wife’s entry into a care facility.Last year, he decided to go about building on his 3.2ha block of land at Shaw Rd, just northwest of the Innisfail CBD.“I couldn’t afford to build a house, but knew there had to be an alternative,” said the experienced electrician and all-round handyman.Mr James trawled the internet before finding two “freezer wagons” for sale in Cairns.“I lifted them up with cranes in Cairns and bought them down here,” he said. “They have been perfect, and I reckon this has turned out even better than a house.“I overlook the river and have beautiful views of Queensland’s two highest mountains.“And I’ll always catch a fish when I cast a line in the river, being careful to stand well back.” More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms3 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns3 days agoBoth elevated railway carriages are 15-metres long, with fully insulated floors, walls and ceilings.A timber deck linking the two carriages, both of which feature a bedroom, is almost complete.But having almost run out of money, Mr James said the time was right to sell the property.“It’s about 95 per cent finished … it would suit a couple or even a small family,” he said.“It’s a rural setting that is still only a few kilometres from town.”The selling price of $240,000 includes a tractor and slasher.Selling agent Di Wagner of First National Mission Beach said the property, which fronts the North Johnstone River, had plenty of room for growing crops.“Fred had limited money but what he’s done is really interesting,” she said. For more information about Lot 6 Shaw Rd, Innisfail, call Di on 0419 685 495.last_img read more

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Three cargoes heading for UK’s South Hook LNG

first_imgIllustration purposes only (Image courtesy of Qatargas)The South Hook LNG terminal on the shores of UK’s Milford Haven waterway is scheduled to receive three cargoes in the following seven days. According to the shipping from the Milford Hafen Port Authority, Flex Endeavour LNG carrier with the capacity to transport 173.400 cubic meters of chilled fuel is set to dock at the facility on Thursday, February 7.The vessel set off from the Norwegian port of Honningsvag, which has recently been used by the Novatek-led Yamal LNG project as a transshipment location.The second cargo, scheduled for Saturday, February 9 is being transported from Qatar’s Ras Laffan LNG complex onboard the Q-Flex liquefied natural gas tanker Al Shamal.Closing the three deliveries is the liquefied natural gas carrier Patris. The vessel capable of transporting 173,400 cubic meters of LNG loaded a cargo in the Netherlands and is scheduled to unload at South Hook on February 13, the shipping data shows.Gas supply from the South Hook terminal to UK’s grid was about 34.81 mcm/day on Thursday morning, according to the latest data by National Grid.The terminal, owned by Qatar Petroleum, ExxonMobil and Total, can provide around 20 percent of Britain’s natural gas requirements. LNG World News Stafflast_img read more

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